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Recurring respiratory issues
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Recurring respiratory issues

Two years ago, I went into the hospital with a collapsed lung and Fusobacterium Necroforum, and over the month recovering from surgery in a coma, contracted Bronchial Organizing Obliterans Pneumonia and Herpes Simplex Virus Pneumonia. No one could tell me how I contracted the first, since it is not a virus.
What could have caused the 'outbreak'(for lack of a better term)? Am I more prone to a recurrance? How likely is one? Are my lungs permanently weakened?
Now, I am continuing to have medical issues, with chest congestion, colds, and ear infections almost continuously. I am allergic to penicillin, and am on Cipro at this time. What could I do to lessen the colds etc? Should my doctor be rotating antibiotics? I have been on Cipro for almost the entire 2 years since the hospital.
I am currently 26 years old, and other than a cold, in good physical health.
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Fusobacterium Necroforum infection is uncommon, but not rare.  This is often associated with obstetrical and gynecologic disorders.  Herpes Simplex infection other than "cold sores" is an opportunistic infection, so it usually does not occur in a healthy person.

Bronchiolitis obliterans with organizing pneumonia (BOOP) is a lung disease where scar tissue forms in the small airways and almost always the air sacs that are in the area.  Cigarette smoking does not cause this lung disease.  It may be due to an infection such as a flu-like illness or pneumonia.  Most of the time it is not possible to determine exactly what has damaged the lungs.  Mucus lingers in these small airways and the air sacs.  As it clears it leaves behind scar tissue.  The symptoms may be chest congestion, an ongoing dry cough, and shortness of breath.  The chest x-ray is usually abnormal.  A lung biopsy is done to be certain that this is BOOP and not an irreversible interstitial lung disease.

Corticosteroids need to be started early to treat BOOP, before there is scar tissue.  To completely clear BOOP it can take at least 3 months of corticosteroids.  BOOP may return if the corticosteroids are decreased too soon or too quickly.  Sometimes corticosteroids need to be given for months to years to keep BOOP from returning.  The corticosteroid dose is decreased as soon as possible and as low as possible to avoid side effects.  There are many possible side effects from corticosteroids including muscle weakness.  Please read our oral steroid information at http://www.nationaljewish.org/disease-info/treatments/quick/oral-steroids.aspx to learn more about the side effects and their prevention.  Talk with your doctor about preventing and watching for these side effects.

Recurring infections are the most common problems with immune deficiencies.  These commonly include sinus infections and chest infections like bronchitis and pneumonia.  Blood tests will reveal if there are any cells lacking from a complete immune system.  Blood tests will also show if the cells are present but lack adequate amounts for the system to function effectively.  Please read our immune deficiency information at http://www.nationaljewish.org/disease-info/diseases/immune-def/index.aspx to learn more.  An immunologist would be the type of specialist to identify if you have an immune problem and the best treatment.
4 Comments
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Avatar_n_tn
Out of curiosity, were you on a ventilator during the period in a coma?  There is a possibility if so that you contracted those diseases from Ventilator Associated Pneumonias and if they were not using a closed system and opening and closing and breaking circuits this may have caused this.  There is a chance that your lungs may have scarring but you will not find this out for some time ahead and could cause some future respiratory issues in the future.
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Avatar_n_tn
I was on a ventilator when I contracted BOOP and Herpes Simplex Virus Pneumonia, yes. The doctors had to reinflate my right lung after surgery to clean out the pleural sac.
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Avatar_n_tn
I wonder why Lemierre's syndrome is not called as the original source of your illness. If you suffered just before your intake in the hospital of a sore throat this may be the solution. Fusobacterium necroforum is an normal anaerobic inhabitant of our throats and seldom, but if it does so, makes you severy ill with lungabscesses and other metastatic evidence of infections. If a periferal lungabsces breaks into the pleural cavity a collaps of the lung can result. The other illnesses you describe are known sequalae of the first.
If I were you, I should try to contact a Infectious disease doctor in an University Clinic and ask for advice.
Succes and all the best.
Feel free to contact me if you wish, welcome.
Dr. Hans de Jong, MD, medical microbiologist (retired), Amersfoort, The Netherlands. E-mail address eenj.***@****.
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