Respiratory Disorders Expert Forum
Thank You and question regarding glass dust
About This Forum:

This forum is for questions and support regarding lung and respiratory issues. such as: Allergies, Asthma, Bronchitis, Colds - Flu, Chronic Cough, COPD, Cystic Fibrosis, Emphysema, Fibrosis, Lung Abscess, Nasal Polyps, Pleurisy, Pneumonia, Sarcoidosis, Sinusitis, Tuberculosis.

Font Size:
A
A
A
Background:
Blank
Blank
Blank
This expert forum is not accepting new questions. Please post your question in one of our medical support communities.
Blank Blank

Thank You and question regarding glass dust

First, thanks so much for your reply to an earlier question. It prompted me to have my asthma & allergies re-evaluated. As a result my diagnoses changed, I am now on new medication (Singular), under treatment by a new doc and feeling so much better!  Second, I had an additional question:  I work with stained glass as a hobby and have recently begun to wear a half-face respirator during soldering so as not to make my asthma worse from fume inhalation. (I didn't do this during the first few years). My question is, should I also be wearing some sort of breathing protection when I grind the glass pieces? The glass grinder uses a shield directly over the grinding bit (about 10 x 12 inches), but I stand directly over it, with my face only about 12-18 inches from the shield. The glass is ground wet, and there is spray, and you can often see a fine, colored glass dust accumulating.  Is the wet glass dust in the air harmful if breathed?  Or is it unlikely to be breathed in? I know it is harmful to breath fiberglass particles, so I was wondering about this.  Thanks in advance for your feedback. I do appreciate having this forum available.
Related Discussions
251132_tn?1198082422
Yes, the glass dust that is in the air above the grinder is harmful.  It might cause silicosis if enough of it is inhaled over time.  Since you use a respirator, you should be sure that it is the right one to protect you from your specific exposures, that include lead fumes and glass particle dust.  In addition, the respirator should be fit tested by a trained technician to be sure that the mask you are using fits your face and excludes these harmful exposures.  Simply picking one off a shelf may not protect you adequately.  National Jewish Medical and Research Center has a respiratory fit program that you are welcome to contact at (800) 621-0505 x1539.
1 Comment
Blank
Avatar_n_tn
A related discussion, scroia dust (cinders) was started.
Blank
Continue discussion Blank
This Forum's Experts
242587_tn?1355427710
David Tinkelman, M.D.Blank
National Jewish Health
Denver, CO
Blank
Request an Appointment
MedHelp Health Answers
Blank
Asthma Tracker
Asthma Tracker
Start Tracking Now
Blank
Allergy Tracker
Allergy Tracker
Start Tracking Now
RSS Expert Activity
233488_tn?1310696703
Blank
New Cannabis Article from NORTH Mag...
Jul 20 by John C Hagan III, MD, FACS, FAAOBlank
242532_tn?1269553979
Blank
3 Reasons Why You are Still Binge E...
Jul 14 by Roger Gould, M.D.Blank
242532_tn?1269553979
Blank
Emotional Eating: What Your Closet ...
Jul 09 by Roger Gould, M.D.Blank