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hpv inquires
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The STD Forum is intended only for questions and support pertaining to sexually transmitted diseases other than HIV/AIDS, including chlamydia, gonorrhea, syphilis, human papillomavirus, genital warts, trichomonas, other vaginal infections, nongonoccal urethritis (NGU), cervicitis, molluscum contagiosum, chancroid, and pelvic inflammatory disease (PID). All questions will be answered by H. Hunter Handsfield, M.D. or Edward W Hook, MD.

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hpv inquires

1.  Is there statistical data available to predict the likelihood of a male/female that has been infected by HPV 6 or 11 of developing genital warts?  What is the likelihood of an individual that has contracted these particular strains in being asymptomatic?

2.  Once treated, and time has elapsed without any sign of genital warts can it be assumed the your immune system has suppressed the virus for good?  When your infection becomes dormant can you still transmit it to another individual?

3.  When viewing the extreme grotesque pictures of genital warts on the internet can it be assumed for the most part the these individuals are immunocompromised or can warts be that severe in immunocompentant individuals

4.  Is there any truth that cimetidine can enhance an immune response that can help to rid genital warts?

5.  Is it true that the rapid HIV test can detect HIV antibodies in 95-98% of the population with 28 days of exposure?
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Since you launch directly into the questions, without background context, that's how I will reply.

1) There are few data in men.  Among women, 70-80% who acquire HPV 6 or 11 develop visible warts.  A few of those are in the vagina, and it's also harder for women to see their genitals clearly compared with men.  So if anything, the proportion in men probably is somewhat higher.  In other words, unlike other HPV infections, most due to HPV 6/11 appear to be symptomatic, with visible warts.

2) In most people, the immune system clears the infection, with or without treatment.  How long it takes isn't clear, probably usually 3-12 months.  It is generally believed that once overt warts are gone, infectiousness is greatly reduced.  But whether there is some potential for transmission, and for how long, isn't known for sure.

3) People with giant, "grotesque" warts have just as strong immune systems as people with milder warts, at least to the extent that science knows how to measure the strength of immunity.  The reasons for the wide individual variation are not known.

4) I am aware of no data that cimetidine (or any other drug) can do what you say.  There is no biological reason that I know of that cimetidine would make a difference.

5) At least 90% of newly infected persons would have positive results at 4 weeks.  Many experts would agree with your 95-98% figure.

Regards--  HHH, MD
3 Comments
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"Among women, 70-80% who acquire HPV 6 or 11 develop visible warts."

Is there any statistical data that supports this assumption? Actually i have learned in my medical studies, that also low risk infections are mostly asymptomatic. So do you have any reliable source for this thesis?
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239123_tn?1267651214
You are right about the conventional wisdom and that is what textbooks say.  But look up recent studies by Rachel Winer and her mentor Laura Koutsky.  They followed initially virgin female college students with regular HPV tests.  Among those who acquired HPV 6/11, 70-80% developed visible warts. Some were internal, where they might not be noticed, but most were noticeable by the study subjects.  The results were a surprise to me too.  But this was a very well done research study and the results probably are valid.  Still, we should hope for confirmatory research before being certain the results weren't a fluke.
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