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testing needed?
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testing needed?

hi....im just a bit confused since ive read that some STI'S have no symptoms and cant really decide whether or not i was at risk.

i had protected vaginal and oral sex with a prostitute. ive read that some STD'S are transmitted through skin to skin contact.

ive had no symptoms (just a single small sebaceous cyst which was diagnosed by both dermatologist and urologist as a sebaceous cyst)

Am I at risk of any asymptomatic STI then?? Should I go for a test??

THANKS!
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Some people can asymptomatic to some sexually transmitted infections but not all. Herpes, Syphilis, HPV are examples of std that can be transmitted via skin to skin contact. Most people do not have stds and even if they did, it would take more than just one time to get any of them. Stds are hard to transmit because they require vigorous and extensive periods of sex in order for one person to acquire them. If you are concern with this exposure, then, you should get tested, not only to know your status, but, to give peace of mind. Most csw (prostitutes) check themselves monthly and they know  they could be exposing themselves to stds so they make sure protection is used in all client meetings. They not only want to avoid trouble from their clients legally but they do not want to endanger themselves medically. So to answer your question:

1) Protected sex both vaginally and orally are no risk for std transmission.

2) A sebaceous cyst can be other things such as yeast or inflamed hair follicle or follicle blockage instead of stds.

3) There is no reason to get tested if you had protected sex but, to alleviate concern and anxiety, get tested to know your status and to put this behind you.
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1331558_tn?1317691287
Some people can asymptomatic to some sexually transmitted infections but not all. Herpes, Syphilis, HPV are examples of std that can be transmitted via skin to skin contact. Most people do not have stds and even if they did, it would take more than just one time to get any of them. Stds are hard to transmit because they require vigorous and extensive periods of sex in order for one person to acquire them. If you are concern with this exposure, then, you should get tested, not only to know your status, but, to give peace of mind. Most csw (prostitutes) check themselves monthly and they know  they could be exposing themselves to stds so they make sure protection is used in all client meetings. They not only want to avoid trouble from their clients legally but they do not want to endanger themselves medically. So to answer your question:

1) Protected sex both vaginally and orally are no risk for std transmission.

2) A sebaceous cyst can be other things such as yeast or inflamed hair follicle or follicle blockage instead of stds.

3) There is no reason to get tested if you had protected sex but, to alleviate concern and anxiety, get tested to know your status and to put this behind you.
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Thanks mate for your well-detailed answer.
Appreciate it!
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