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Chronic dry orgasm is otherwise healthy 22-year old male?
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Chronic dry orgasm is otherwise healthy 22-year old male?

I've never gotten any surgery or had any major trauma to my testicles or prostate. I had a serum testosterone test and I can't remember the number, but it was a healthy level. That's where the testing stopped, as I don't have medical insurance currently. The dry orgasm has been constant: usually no semen output, and maybe a measly little drop if I'm lucky (pretty low for a 22 year old guy). What are possible causes, when it's always been like that? Since it's always been like that and my testosterone seems to be ok, would it make a difference seeing a doctor, or would I most likely get told "sorry, not much can be done, you might want to adopt"? Any clue what kind of testing would be done, and how much I would spend on something like that, without insurance?
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And there's no pain during orgasm and I'm not taking any meds. Sex is still pleasurable but I'm pretty sure semen output isn't s'posed to be that low.
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790669_tn?1407103224
Hey there!  Sorry you're havin to deal with this and the worst part is not knowing why. I looked this up and this is what I found.  Hope it helps!

Retrograde ejaculation has several possible causes, including:

Damage from surgery to the muscles of the bladder, or to the nerves that control these muscles — This damage can occur as a complication of the following surgical procedures:

Prostate surgery — Men who have had a transurethral prostatectomy (removal of prostate tissue through the urethra) have a 10-15 % chance of retrograde ejaculation. A prostatectomy (surgery to remove the entire prostate gland, either for cancer or benign enlargement) results in a higher risk of retrograde ejaculation after the procedure.


Surgery on certain parts of the bladder


Extensive pelvic surgery, especially to treat cancer of the prostate, testicles, colon or rectum


Staging surgery for cancer in the pelvis or lower abdomen (this surgery removes lymph nodes in the pelvis and lower abdomen to help determine how far cancer has spread)


Certain types of surgery on the discs and vertebrae of the lower spine



Nerve damage caused by medical illness — This is especially common in men with multiple sclerosis or with long-term, poorly controlled diabetes.


Side effects of medication — Medications that may cause retrograde ejaculation include drugs to treat:

Prostate enlargement — tamsulosin (Flomax) or terazosin (Cardura)


Depression -- especially selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) such as fluoxetine (Prozac), sertraline (Zoloft) and several others


Psychosis -- such as chlorpromazine (Thorazine), thioridazine (Mellaril) and risperidone (Risperdal)



Retrograde ejaculation does not interfere with a man's ability to have an erection or to achieve orgasm, but it can cause infertility because the sperm cannot reach the woman's uterus. Retrograde ejaculation is responsible for about 1% of all cases of male infertility in the United States.


Treatment

Most men who have retrograde ejaculation do not need specific treatment. If the condition is a side effect of medication, your doctor may be able to switch you to a different drug that does not cause the problem. In other men, all that is needed is reassurance that retrograde ejaculation is not a serious medical problem and that it is not a sign of a serious condition.

In some men, retrograde ejaculation requires treatment because it interferes with fertility. This treatment varies depending on the cause. If your retrograde ejaculation is a side effect of medication, your doctor probably will switch you to a drug that does not affect ejaculation. If your retrograde ejaculation appears to be related to a mild nerve or muscle problem involving the bladder, then your doctor will treat you with a drug — such as pseudoephedrine (sold under many brand names) or imipramine (Tofranil) — that improves muscle tone at the bladder entrance.

If your retrograde ejaculation is the result of severe damage to the nerves or muscles of your bladder, then it may not be possible to restore normal ejaculation. If this is the case, and you are hoping to father a child, a fertility specialist may be able to help. The fertility specialist may collect sperm from your urine and use washed sperm for an assisted-fertilization procedure. In cases of retrograde ejaculation, three of the more commonly used assisted fertilization procedures are:

Intrauterine insemination (using a small catheter to put washed sperm inside your partner's uterus at the time of ovulation)


In-vitro fertilization (incubating eggs and sperm together in the laboratory to produce fertilization)


Intracytoplasmic sperm injection (injecting a single sperm into your partner's egg to cause fertilization)



I really hope this helps!   Best of luck to you!
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