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4 year old with aggressive problem at school
My son had snoring issues and sleep apnea before his adenoids came out about a year and a half ago.  Things cleared up when the adenoids came out. He went to a preschool last year and was fine.  This year he is aggressive--and disruptive- screams and cries over triggers the teachers cannot pinpoint.  We have noticed that he is more difficult at home, but his behavior is amplified at school.  We are not an aggressive home and we do impose time outs for violations of house rules (hitting, screaming at others etc).. He knows right from wrong.. but his behavior at school is really odd and has seemed to get worse over the last 6 months.  He is now snoring again- he is a mouth breather again all night--I can hear him down the hall breathing, but the snoring is only a few minutes out of each hour I observe him.. with a loud snort and gasps and a change of position to end the noise for a bit. He fully awakes 2-3 times a night and only sleeps 9 hours. His bed wetting, which was nearly nonexistent last year is now every night again.  He now vomits mucus every time he is sick because it pools up in his throat at night.  He complains of exhaustion and lays on the couch for hours a day.  His pediatrician cannot find anything wrong with him to explain  the "I'm tireds" that he complains about.  He had lyme disease over the summer which caused exhaustion as well.. but it was treated.  I am seeing a psychologist for his school behavior, have an appointment with the ENT to look at tonsils -which ere not removed with the adenoids before and an appointment with a developmental pediatrician in case apnea is not an issue and he really is  aggressive for a developmental reason all of a sudden.   The school told me that tired kids are not usually aggressive, they are "sleepy" and he never yawns.  My question is this.-can sleep problems really make a child aggressive, oppositional and defiant?
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Avatar universal
It's certainly possible. There are no rules with children. What's concerning is that he's snoring again. The only way to know if he has sleep apnea is to undergo a sleep study. However, if the ENT thinks that the tonsils are large and sleep apnea is a good possibility, this should be addressed first before undergoing any any other treatment options. Most children do better with tonsillectomy, but there's always a few children that have persistent sleep apnea. Sometimes palatal expansion is another option if he has dental crowding or bite problems.
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