Aa
A
A
Close
Avatar_universal
Occupational Therapist
I pulled my calf muscle and did not originally rest it much. I had swelling, however, little pain-mostly swelling and tightness. no bruising or discoloration. I went the the Dr. they did an ultrasound and ruled out a clot. I went to the PT and he said I could go back to my workout as it was a minor strain on the gastroc. Last weekend Friday, Sat, and Sunday I hit it hard with a 2 high impact aerobic class and weight lifting. By the end of the Sunday high aerobic impact class, I was feeling some discomfort/pain in my knee and then also in the foot on the injured leg. On Monday, I noticed that the swelling had slightly increased (from where it was prior to my weekend workouts)  and the calf area was tight and swollen again. Last night (Tues), I iced, applied heat, and iced again with elevation. The swelling seems to be moving down my leg and is now in the anke. My original injury was median and I thought originally under the right knee. It wasn't a major pain sensation so I continued working out.
The only discomfort I have now is tightness in the middle of the calf with swelling (no bruising). Should I be concerned that my right calf is still swollen. My original injury was about 2 weeks ago. My job is active as I am an OT with kids so I am on my feet all day.
I also saw a Chiro and he gave it some electrical stim and ultrasound on Monday. I am going back to him tomorrow.
Anything else I can do to decrease the swelling??
How active should I be at this point??
Cancel
2 Answers
Page 1 of 1
Avatar_universal
One of the best therapies for helping tissue repair is using heat and ice alternatively. HEat it for awhile and then ice it for awhile (or you can sit in a "hot" bath and get out and put ice on it and repeat).

If the injury is to your calf, I would pay attention to your feet when you're exercising! Make sure they are straight forward, and make sure to give equal pressure to the toes AND heels when you're exercising. A lot of right-handed people tend to use the left heel as a crutch, not putting any pressure into the left toes, but letting all the weight fall on the heel. This can over-work the back muscles of the leg! Making sure the left toes and foot receive pressure when exercising can take some of the strain off the calf and put some of it back into the front of the leg!
Comment
Cancel
Avatar_universal
Comment
Comment
Submit Comment
Avatar_universal
BTW - if you still have swelling exercise will make it worse not better. If the swelling has abated, and the leg is just sore, you can go back to exercising.
Comment
Cancel
Avatar_universal
Comment
Comment
Submit Comment
Your Answer
Avatar_universal
Answer
Know how to answer? Tap here to leave your answer...
Answer
Occupational Therapist
Submit Answer
A
A
Blank
Weight Tracker
Weight Tracker
Start Tracking Now
Stress Community Resources