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Bilateral Cerebellum Stroke
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Bilateral Cerebellum Stroke

Hi Everyone

My dad had a bilateral Cerebellum Stroke on the 17th of July 2013. His neurosurgeon did a crainotomy immediately and my dad made it though the operation. The doctors advised us that a stroke on both sides of the brian is very rare and they were not very optimistic that he would pull through it but he did. He woke up 3 days after the opertaion once the induced coma wore off and he was able to move both sides of his body and communicate. A few days later his blood pressure started to increase and it almost reached 300 at one stage so the doctors put him into an induced come again just to get the situation under control. He woke up from that coma and was also doing well but a few days later he became unresponsive. His CT scan showed fluid on the brain. The neurosurgeon inserted an external VP shunt to drain the fluid (he could not do the permanant shunt into his stomach as they discovered an infection in his brian so it was risky as the infection might spread to the rest of his body). He woke up after the op and he was doing well again but then became unresponsive again. Another CT scan showed fluid elsewhere on then brain. The neurosuregon inserted another VP shunt, this time a permanent one as the infection cleared. He woke up again and was doing well then became unresponsive again. Since then he has needed another crainotomy and had had 5 VP shunt operations. The shunts were blocking and the fluid was not draining, two weeks ago the neurosurgeon removed the valve from the shunt to prevent blockages and this seems to be working as the last 2 CT scans were good, he had one done yesterday. He alos had a tracheotomy as he stopped breathing at one stage. Last week my dad was doing very well, managing to sit and even breathe on his own for extended periods of time. But on Sunday he became very sleepy again. He opens his eyes for seconds and nods his head that he hears us sometimes but that is about it. Originally we though that there was fluid on the brain again and that is why he had a CT scan done yesterday but that was good. He had a peg instered into his stomach on Monday night to feed him as well so he was under anestetic again so I understand him being tired after that operation but even today he is just much more tired than last week. He has also developed another infection again but we are still waiting for the blood results to indicate where the infection is. The doctors think it is in the chest. This has been a very difficult journey as it has been full of ups and downs. It is also very difficult to see your father so helpless and suffering. Fortunately his vital signs have been stable most of the time and he keeps fighting every day so there is hope. He is only 54 and had a heart bypass last year so he was looking after his health and getting regular check ups. My question is it normal for him to sleep all the time for 3 days now without there being any fluid on the brain? The doctors keep saying they don't know what to do anymore but they are still trying. He is not in a coma as he does respond and his scores on the Glasgow Coma scale were 9/10 and 10/10 yesterday and slightly lower today 8/10 and 9/10, (since he is on the trachea the score is only out of 10 and not the 15). Any feedback will be greatly appreciated. I have struggled to find information on bilateral cerebellum strokes as they are so rare.  The doctor told me today that she is worried as he is just not recovering and it has been two months now.  My question is it normal for him to sleep all the time for 3 days now without there being any fluid on the brain?  Also I noticed today that his eyes were squint and they weren't before.  Is this normal to happen in stroke patients?  
Avatar_dr_f_tn
Hello, understand your anxiety, it is difficult to see your father go through this phase. His exceesive sleeping could be due to the medications or the fluid build up in the barin. The squinting of the eyes could indicate that the cranial nerves, the nerves supplying the eyes are affected. Accoring to studies done, bilateral cerebellar infarction is a life threatening condition. However, few patients survive with a good functional recovery. Good luck with his therapy. Regards.
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