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Feeding Through The Nose
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Feeding Through The Nose

Hello
Could some help me and explain to me to pros and cons of feeding through the nose into to stomach My Mom Suffered a Servere MCA Right Brain Stroke Cant Move left side at all
Thanks
Tags: nose, feeding, brain, Stroke, help
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144586_tn?1284669764
It is an alternative to putting in a feeding tube to the stomach, and common with those suffering from an inability to swallow. It is a reasonable and prudent measure, and usually undertaken only when swallowing is impossible. Often the ability to swallow returns, and then the nasal tube is removed. It is uncomfortable, but it shows respect for your mom because they could have pressured you directly into a feeding tube utilizing a surgical opening.
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caregiver222 Thank you for answering my question We are doing this feeding for a week and see if her strength wil improve she suffered a mca right brain stroke 6 days ago a very servere one today we had to transport her to a rehab center so for 5 days she had nothing to eat so we went forth with the tube last night today before the transport she was more responsive than in the past days and managed to take a sip of pinapple juice which i thinks is great i am hoping that tonight she makes it through the night also they dont have a heart monitor on her and last night about six hours after the tube install she complained of chest pains would'nt it be a good safe idea to have on a heart monitor until she is more stable?
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144586_tn?1284669764
The difficulty in swallowing is often perplexing in that it usually involves an inability to swallow thin liquids, while thick substances may be swallowed. Sometimes neither can be swallowed. Often the swallowing reflex will return only at an odd time of the day, such as midnight, which, of course is inconsistent with the feeding schedules in nursing facilities. My sweet 103 year old continues to have ocasional difficulties in swallowing thin liquids or solids and at every feeding opportunity the aides are instructed to determine her ability to swallow (a) thin liquids and (b) thick substances. There are days when her swallowing is absolutely normal, by the way. The think to insure is that the aides do not "force feed" or simply shove spoonfuls in the mouth because the patient opens her mouth. After every spoonful the patient should be checked for "cheeking". If food is cheeked do not allow the patient to fall asleep, but remove the food with a finger, if necessary. With my 103 year old I write in large letters on the dry-erase board "SPIT IT OUT!" and she usually complies.  My rule is a full minute between spoonfuls when she is being fed, unless she is feeding herself, but after a year of not being able to do so she regained use of her hands and fingers and can now feed herself quite well. As far as the heart moniter goes, one is pretty mjuch at the mercy of the protocol of the medical facility at which the patient is treated. I prepare thick nourishing soups daily reduced to a very heavy consistency, laced with butter, garlic and hot sauce. My little one often develops a full swallow ability late every evening, and often has full meals at ten P.M. for this reason. During many afternoons she cannot swallow. There appears to be a circadian pattern.  Between ten and midnight I get eight ounces of fluid into her many evenings. All the rehab centers do some good, some more than others. If any patient complained of chest pains she should have been in an ICU, however elderly patients are not agressively treated, especially if they have strokes. That is simply a fact of life. Even without a DNR, it requires a great deal of effort to prod the medical staff into providing treatment. The stoke is far too recent to make any determination whatsoever regarding what her quality of life will be. But be optimistic and don't give up hope!
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144586_tn?1284669764
I might add that not all chest pain is cardiogenic and they may have determined from the type of pain (to give them the benefit of the doubt) this was not a heart problem requiring monitoring.
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Well my worst fears are relizes on dec 9 mom suffered a heart attack at the rehab center took them 4 hours before i pushed for her to go to a hospital today mon dec 10 they told she has a clot in her hip and suffered a heart attack i just keeps getting worse she has artireal defilbration if i am saying this right today her heart was beating at 160 bpm got it down to 95 and 105 this just gets harder and harder to cope with she can talk to me sometimes which i this is a blessing any thoughts or ideas would be a great help
victor
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hi i noticed you helped the previous person and i was wondering if you would be kind enough to help me too. My dad recently suffered a minor stroke meaning he is unable to talk, we were thinking of different ways to feed him. we were hoping of a method of feeding that is available at home as my father gained the illness through putting him in respite. thanks
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