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Frozen shoulder
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Frozen shoulder

We are looking for experiences or info relating to "frozen shoulder" problems after stroke. My close friend had a bleed on the right side of her brain which resulted in limited use of her left arm and leg as well as some loss of periferal vision to the left. This happened August 30, 2006. Through therapy she is walking although fairly straight legged with her left. Her shoulder is the biggest concern as it is the cause of much pain when she tries to raise her arm or if someone raises it for her. The shoulder problem is the next big step in returning self dependence and confidence to someone who was a very independent and active 47 year old. Thanks for any help and ideas.
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She needs to go to a pain specialist, M.D. type. It is impossible to advise on a problem like this via a column of this type. Sometimes, in some cases, with some patients, the answer is to exercise through the limit of pain. This is contrary to common sense, which tells you that "Pain means I am damaging something and is a sign to stop movement". If you don't use range of motion through the limits of pain, the movement of the limb becomes more and more restricted.
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Hello,

I started perusing this post because my 65 year old uncle had a severe stroke two weeks ago. However, when I saw your frozen shoulder subjet, I wanted to share my experience with frozen shoulder. I am a 45 year old active, healthy woman who experienced this two years ago. I tried painful physical therapy but only made baby steps. I then took the surgery option, actually it is an outpatiend procedure called Manipulation Under Anesthesia (MUA). Within 48 hours of this procedure I was 90% healed with full mobility. I wished I would not have wasted all that time in therapy. It did not good and the MUA was not painful. I am relatively young, so I had minimal concern for a break, but I know that is a bigger concern in older patients. Good Luck.
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