Aa
A
A
Close
Blank
Avatar universal
Rehab for right arm
My father who is now 79 had a stroke in 2007 - hematoma and he lost his speech and the right side of his body was paralyzed. However, he regained his speech and body movements after 6 weeks of therapy. But his right arm is still paralyzed.

I was wondering what kind of treatment or therapy would help his right arm. He has completely regained all that he lost with the stroke except his right arm. Can you please let me know if there are new type of treatment for his right arm. Otherwise, he is in great health.

Cancel
2 Answers
2 Answers
Page 1 of 1
Avatar universal
Hey,
   I am sorry to hear about your father.
As you have experienced with your father, stroke is a common and a serious condition. The way that our brain reacts following a stroke is pretty much amazing. In case of your father, regaining his abilities to walk and talk is good expected. The fact that the hand is still "paralyzed" (although I won't call it paralysis) is because the upper limb's functional use in normal individuals is very complicated. Subsequently, regaining such functional use is a challange especially with severe injuries to the brain. The most imporant thing is that you never give up and alway have faith and hope. Based on what you are descriping your dad's condition and the date of onset, I would say that it was a major (severe) stroke. Of course there are alot of options in rehabilitation, but using any of these interventions will depend on your father's condition, and you can discuss that with the therapist. Aditionaly, I would say that your dad has a high degree of spasticity (am I right?) and that on of the resons why getting good out comes from rehabilitation. Besides, patients following a stroke develope a kind of "learned paralysis" that result from not using the upper limb during various daily activities. Based on my experience in stroke rehab, it was a little bit difficult to get some good outcomes in the affected upper limb in severely impacted stroke survivors. And even we got some outcomes as PTs, it will be useless if such outcomes won't improve the functional use of the afected upper limb. But as I told you, it is always important to prevent some secondary complications that can make achieving any good outcomes from any possible intervention more difficult.
it is always important that the patient and the family understand what to expect. So, if your father is in great health and can walk independantly and acts independantly in most of his daily activity, that is great and work on improving that by encouragning him more and more.
did that give you same idea about your question?
Please don't hesitate to talk more about it, it is a good thing :)
        
Comment
Cancel
Avatar universal
Comment
Comment
Submit Comment
241234 tn?1220984156
Pleae read Peter Levines blog at http://recoverfromstroke.blogspot.com/ the section on
How stroke survivors can be so wrong it hurts them. He talks about the question of whether it is paralysis or just not functionally usable yet. I can close my hand if it is open so it is not paralyzed but it is not functionally usable. He also has a wonderful book out that should be required reading for every medical professional working with stroke survivors.
Dean
Comment
Cancel
241234 tn?1220984156
Comment
Comment
Submit Comment
Your Answer
Avatar universal
Answer
Know how to answer? Tap here to leave your answer...
Answer
Submit Answer
A
A
Blank
Weight Tracker
Weight Tracker
Start Tracking Now
Stroke Community Resources
RSS Expert Activity
233488 tn?1310696703
Blank
Marathon Running Done Over Many Yea...
May 21 by John C Hagan III, MD, FACS, FAAOBlank
233488 tn?1310696703
Blank
New Article on Multifocal IOL vs &q...
May 21 by John C Hagan III, MD, FACS, FAAOBlank
748543 tn?1443740527
Blank
TMJ/TMJ The Connection Between Teet...
01/15 by Hamidreza Nassery , DMD, FICOI, FAGD, FICCMOBlank
Top Neurology Answerers
144586 tn?1284669764
Blank
caregiver222
1780921 tn?1462244109
Blank
flipper336
Queen Creek, AZ