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TIA and speech problems
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TIA and speech problems

Good afternoon Dr.,

My grandfather suffered a TIA just over a month ago, where he presented with unilateral weakness, lack of coordination, vertigo, and speech problems.  Although he is in his late 80's, he has always been very active.  The weakness and coordination problems showed quick improvement, but he still has speaking problems.  Initially he had trouble starting to speak, and although this slowly improved, he still has difficulty.  I am not sure whether this is because he cannot physically articulate, or because he can't recall the correct words (I am in another country so cannot see him, only know what I am being told).  In any case, my question is about recovery expectations: I understand that dysfunction resulting from TIAs can resolve quite rapidly, but I also read that for speech problems, these typically show the most improvement in the first couple of weeks.  Does this mean that what he is left with will likely be permanent?  What can be expected in terms of recovery time re. speech function, and for that matter, any other residual problems?  And of course, the omnipresent prognosis issue.  I understand that TIA in elderly especially indicates a much higher risk of a major stroke, but what are the main risk factors that can be used to predict prognosis?

Thank you in advance for your help in providing such valuable information.
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I was taken into emergency when I had a sharp pain down the left side of my arms and was resultantly diagnosed with parasthesias.  I was told by several doctors that I did not have a TIA or mini-stroke as two CAT scans did not indicate this.  Despite their medical opinions about not have one, I remain unable to be articulate and to speak with ease as I used to.  I have  problems with clipped speech and have trouble beginning my sentence without speaking in jarble and without sounding incohrent.  Sometimes I have no problem with what comes out but have to think carefully before I speak in order to not jumbel up on my words.  These symptoms have occurred immediately right before the emergency room.  Since my doctors said I did not have a TIA or stroke, what does this mean?  I am going into speech therapy today to see what is going on, as the doctors felt due to circumstances I had overwhelming anxiety and that this was the reason.  I am skeptical that I did not have a  TIA or mini-stroke as I have had anxiety all my life and have never experienced anything like this.  Does anyone have any idea?  Thank you. Stacey Foreman
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