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post stroke aphasia-loss of speech
My mom had an ischemic stroke 5.5 months ago. Her right side affected. She also lost her ability for spontaneous speech. Her comprehension is good. If I start a sentence for her, she has a chance to finish it. Otherwise she uses only one word to express anything and everything, just seldom she can say some short statements that apply to the situation. She started showing her ability to read (big letters mostly)
Has anybody seen this? Does my mom have a chance (not like “never give up on a hope” – we do not) but a real chance to start talking again. We have seen some progress but it is so slow that I just need to hear if anybody has started talking after many months, especially if they could not talk AT ALL right after stroke for a while. Thanks! Lana
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My Dad had a sever ichemic stroke in January. His speech is very limited yet he can read no problem, he loves reading aloud subtitles on tv, road signs, number plates. His speech is improving a little and we can pick up maybe 30% of what he is saying. I've convinced reading is a big help. You should continue to try it
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How is your dad doing? Did you father have a stoke on the right side of the brain (left side of the body  affected) or left side of the brain when right side of the body became not good?
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Hi,

How are you? There is this beautiful article at the New York Times:  http://www.nytimes.com/2008/04/22/health/22stro.html?_r=1&oref=slogin

Melodic intonation therapy, was developed in which aims to help patients with damage to Broca’s area or the speaking center of the brain, located in its left hemisphere. Melodic intonation therapy seems to engage the right hemisphere by asking patients to tap out rhythms and repeat simple melodies. Therapists’ first work with patients to create sing-song sentences that can be set to familiar tunes, then work on removing the melody to leave behind a more normal speaking pattern. This kind of therapy is recommended for patients who have no meaningful form of speech, but can understand language and have the patience for therapy sessions.

I hope this helps. Take care always and regards.

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my daughter has had a stroke after been beaten up =, her memory seems ok but speech is not good she can move her legs, she is just 30 has any one got any suggestions
j wicks
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