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stroke and hiccup
My father had in june an ischemic stroke in the area of the middle cerebral artery. 10 days after it a persistent hiccup started. He did a chest ct scan and a gastroscopy and there is nothing relevant on them. This hiccup often starts after meals, with an eructation, and sometimes he stops 1 or 2 hours after he falls asleep. Normally it lasts from 2 to 4/8 days. What can we do? Could it be a consequence of the stroke even if it didn't involve the brainstem and cerebellum part of the brain? We already treated him with: baclofen, promazine, omeprazole and domperidone. We also try with acupuncture but it didn't work. He is epileptic so he also takes oxcarbazepine.
(excuse my english but I'm italian)
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757137 tn?1347200053
Pressure in the hollows behind the ear lobss are said to stop hiccups. The information is somewhere on MedHelp. I will see if I can find it. You might want to do the same.
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thank you  but we already tried and it didn't work
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As soon as the hiccups start, take continuous sips of water.  It works for me.  My uncle also has had a life time of bad hiccups and said it didn't work.  When I told him to start the sips as soon as the hiccups start, now he says it has worked!  

And yes, it could be a consequence of the stroke.  I read at the Mayo Clinic site that hiccups are a form of myoclonus which I have.  My particular kind causes sudden involuntary jerks of my muscles which was caused by my stroke. The medication, Klonopin, takes care of my myoclonus.  Perhaps it would also treat the hiccups. (You'd be surprised how much the specialists don't know about strokes and the treatments for the effects from them.)

Please let me know if either of these treatments might work for him.
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unfortunately none of them worked
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I saw your same question on another site which got some expert advice that said, "There are two other anticonvulsants that doctors use to treat intractable hiccups: valproic acid and gabapentin."  I hope that you saw it which was posted before your answer back to me.  But in case not, I've included it here. Hope that it might help.
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Thanks but I'm the one that posted it :)
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