278?1253665060
The Chronic Pain Couch User Group
Brain differentiat different laughters.
About This Group:

This is a great site for anyone suffering from Chronic Pain or has a Family member or Friend who suffers. A place where you can tell your story, find others with similar conditions or pain, help someone in need, read up on the latest Chronic Pain treatments or simply sit for a while. Chronic Pain as we all know can be debilitating and relentless. It is not prejudice in any way, shape, or form. It can strike without warning and stay for life. The Chronic Pain Couch is a place designed for your comfort, and please note.. You don't have to suffer from chronic Pain to be a part of this community, we offer a variety of other topics as well. I truly hope that you will come and join us. And remember, there is never a need to worry whether or not your post has been read, a member or myself (Molly) are generally available to read and respond to all posts that come our way...... We are always here for you. Together We CAN Make A Difference in each others lives and how we manage day to day in coping with our relentless pain. Warmest regards, Mollyrae, founder of The Chronic Pain Couch.

Founded by Mollyrae on September 22, 2009
768 members
Font Size:
A
A
A
Background:
Blank
Blank
Blank
Blank Blank

Brain differentiat different laughters.

WASHINGTON: Different types of laughter such as joyful, mocking and ticklish makes the brain react in different ways, a new study has found.

These different kinds of laughter also spark different connections within the "laughter perception network" in the human brain depending on their context, according to scientists.

A laugh may signal mockery, humour, joy or simply be a response to tickling, but each kind of laughter conveys a wealth of auditory and social information.

Laughter in animals is a form of social bonding based on a primordial reflex to tickling, but human laughter has come a long way from these playful roots, researchers said.

Though many people laugh when they're tickled, 'social laughter' in humans can be used to communicate happiness, taunts or other conscious messages to peers.

Researchers studied participants' neural responses as they listened to three kinds of laughter: joy, taunt and tickling.

"Laughing at someone and laughing with someone leads to different social consequences," said Dirk Wildgruber from the University of Tuebingen, Germany.

"Specific cerebral connectivity patterns during perception of these different types of laughter presumably reflect modulation of attentional mechanisms and processing resources," said Wildgruber.

The researchers found that brain regions sensitive to processing more complex social information were activated when people heard joyous or taunting laughter, but not when they heard the 'tickling laughter'.

However, 'tickling laughter' is more complex than the other types at the acoustic level, and consequently activated brain regions sensitive to this higher degree of acoustic complexity.

These dynamic changes activated and connected different regions depending on the kind of laughter participants heard. Patterns of brain connectivity can impact cognitive function in health and disease.

Though some previous research has examined how speech can influence these patterns, this study is among the first few to examine non-verbal vocal cues like laughter.

The study was published in the journal PLOS ONE.
1 Comment
Blank
139792_tn?1299416777
As 'Fun' is the new target of the new group, I am submitting and article apporiate to the new strategy.
Blank
Recent Activity
874521_tn?1375890587
Blank
opus88 commented on photo
7 hrs ago
Avatar_f_tn
Blank
mkh9 Is making slow but steady p... Comment
8 hrs ago
Avatar_f_tn
Blank
Classictoo commented on photo
9 hrs ago
MedHelp Health Answers