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Chronic full feeling in neck and intermittent raspy/hoarse voice
m35
Has anyone experienced symptoms of swollen neck glands, raspy hoarse vocal quality intermittently sometimes sort of scratchy voice without fever or any other signs or symptoms? If so what was it? I can't get into a dr. here until August (rural area) and am getting very concerned. My symptoms first began a few months ago very mildly but are now persistent and I am very worried. Any advice, thoughts or similiar experiences???
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550622 tn?1247660320
I was diagnosed with Hyperthyroidism after having similar symptoms.  I totally lost my voice for about 5 weeks.  Had to have a Nuclear Scan of the thyroid to rule out cancer and to see how much iodine the thyroid was actually absorbing.  Me levels were extremely high.  Have been on medication to get under control.

Are you having other symptoms?
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534785 tn?1329595808
I have! My TSH was steadily increasing for awhile but now it's dropped to 'normal' levels, and I don't know what's going on...I had an ultrasound done (which showed "heterogeneous thyroid parenchyma" but no "discrete" nodules), and now I'm having a radioactive iodine uptake procedure done (RAIU) to see if my thyroid is functioning normally. I don't have much pain (sometimes it's sore to the touch or I have a sore throat), but only the right side of my neck is really swollen, even though the whole neck is tight, in general. Your thyroid could be inflamed for some reason (maybe due to too much or too little iodine--i.e. in your water), it could have something to do with allergies/postnasal drip, or it could be infected lymph nodes.....those are just some guesses, though. Definitely get it checked out ASAP. I'll let you know what happens with me, and I hope you feel better soon!
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898
Lack of iodine causes swelling but not inflammation.
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534785 tn?1329595808
Hmmm I thought they were interrelated...part of the inflammatory response is swelling due to an increased blood flow to the area in question. What's the major difference?
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263988 tn?1281957896
I've been hypothyroid for a long time but just recently became hyperthyroid. My lymph nodes became swollen and my throat has been sore and I've been sort of hoarse. It feels like a cold or something but nothing develops. The lymph nodes are decreasing as I become more euthyroid, maybe for the first time in my life I might be normal. Wow!
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393685 tn?1425816122
I recently just got over that terrible ordeal. My neck and lymph nodes were so tender and swollen (inflammed)  You could see the nodes under my jaw and my neck burned with inflammation. I was in the state for about a yer.

My TSH levels bordered subclinical hypothyroid. Now that I have been taken down to a much lower TSH level - the swelling is gone along with the pain and my lymph nodes and back to normal.

I do get some swelling though when the weather is humid.

My voice was raspy for many years too. BUT I smoke.

What relieved me was lowering my TSH AND drinking - or taking in - unrefined sea salt either on food - or drinking it in water. 1T - 8oz water.

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898
In case of iodine deficiency the thyroid enlargement is uniform and painless; in the early stages (age 17-25 years old no nodules are present, the texture of the gland is not changed, it just increased in size up to 30 % of normal volume (16 to 25 cu cm) to compensate for inadequate iodine uptake.
The clinical term for this is diffuse non-toxic goiter.
In plain terms it swollen not due to the inflammatory process but rather to “overgrowth of the follicles”.
During the thyroiditis the gland swells in response to destructive inflammatory process; the thyroid is tender and sore to touch; its size does not change much but “density” is increased.
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