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Frustrated-no dx. TSH tested only. How many have been misdiagnosed?
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Frustrated-no dx. TSH tested only. How many have been misdiagnosed?

This August, a thryoid condition was suspected and my doctor requested a TSH test. The result: 2.1

Throughout this year, I have had numerous symptoms both hyper/hypo. I'm a mess. Because oddball things have hit pretty much my entire system, I think the doctor is looking primarily at a stressful life. Blood tests look alright, white blood count was high but lowered to normal after taking Nistatin for oral thrush. Last year my cholesterol was high, this year it's within normal.
The thing of it is, most of this rather cropped up quickly and having times of feeling a little better and other times, worse.

What bothers me most: discomfort in my throat, neck and my mouth has become sensitive.
The weird thing is, sometime in the thyroid area...it feels worse. During these times, it feels a little bigger (left side) and softer.
In April, I did have my tonsils removed. The ENT wanted to run another CT this month, as in June...think he wasn't impressed with my voice and an enlarged lymph gland (2 months post op).

Anyway, I am wondering: has anyone found out that they indeed have a thyroid problem, despite a normal TSH?

I see that there are some labs work in conjunction with an online site, to run a broader thyroid panel. Unfortunately, that service doesn't extend to our lab (only one, remote island). Frustrating because I'd pay for it, just to know for certain.

The ENT will be back here February and it'll be after that, that I also have a visit with my GP.

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6 Comments Post a Comment
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125112_tn?1217277462
Sorry about that, it's my right side that bugs me. Not my left.
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Avatar_f_tn
Not that I am aware of, unless its thyroid cancer which usually has a normal TSH/levels.
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125112_tn?1217277462
I just read a response by the Dr. who said this:

"Looks like normal thyroid labs -- with mother's history, antibodies may be interesting -- some people with hashimotos have normal TSH and symptoms and occassionally benefit from thyroxine."

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Avatar_f_tn
Yes, I read his post in which his answer was in respons to wendles.  Are you wendles?

Antibodies might tell you if you are autoimmune, but if they don't correspond with thyroid levels then something else might going on.  Antibodies are seen in people with normal thyroids and in other autoimmune disorders.  That is why doctors normally don't treat by antibodies or even symptoms for some thyroid symptoms are shared by other health conditions as well. There is no cure or treatment for antibodies so doctors can't do anything about them. One time test is normal but after that they are usually useless.
If your TSH is even a little high 4 or 5 and with symptoms, then treatment might be warranted.
You never listed your levels with Labs reference range.  TSH relates to hypo or hyper-thyroidism. F/Ts related to autoimmune or other thyroid issues, in how they related to each other.  I am not a expert but know of a little.  

Another thought, have you ever considered that the reason for lowering TSH range is so that more people will fall into the hypothyroid category, whereby pharmaceutical companies can sell more drugs and make more money.  Something on the order of this was just on one of the medical TV channels.

If you want a thyroid problem I'd be gladly to give you mine, LOL! ;)

Take Care and Good Health!
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125112_tn?1217277462
No, I'm not the author of "wendles."
While my mother didn't have her thyroid removed, she was treated for thyroid for a time, many years ago.

I understand that there isn't a cure but you know, having an answer is nice. I can't help but wonder about how many people there are, who are misdiagnosed or told to carry on (they're fine) when in fact, they are not.

Perhaps TSH is the gold standard but is it the "God" to determine a thyroid condition. If there is just a slightest possibility, why don't they look further than the TSH? I am covered, as far as insurance goes. What remainder both my insurance won't pay-we do. I certainly don't have a history with not paying my bills.

For an entire year, I have been "perimenopausal." I am 34 years old. That isn't being treated, either. I guess I will have to try some pro. cream. If only for diagnostic reasons. I would like to know why these things are occuring and as it is, doesn't seem like doctors care to know.

Our lab's reference for TSH is 0.5-5.0 No other thryoid labs were run.

>If you want a thyroid problem I'd be gladly to give you mine, LOL! ;)<

I don't want any further problems, just want to get down to the bottom of mine. Thanks.

I was carting along just fine and then,many things began to change.

>Take Care and Good Health!<

That is exactly what I have been trying to accomplish but I guess, as it is for many people...just as long as it's not them feeling miserable...easy to brush them off.

~Kate




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Avatar_f_tn
A little more info. - hope it helps you understand more about testing.

<Perhaps TSH is the gold standard but is it the "God" to determine a thyroid condition.>

TSH is "God"  along with the F/T-4, for diagnosing hyperthyroid or hyperthyroid.  When symptoms are nonspecific, a follow-up assessment of the free thyroxine (T4) level can help distinguish between primary and secondary hypothyroidism.
TSH is considered to be more 99.8% accurate than the other tests for the individual thyroid hormones. It can detect teenier amounts of the hormone and  doctors tend to rely on the TSH reading, rather than the actual T3, T4 readings from our blood tests.
Then if  warranted, the F/T-3 is done.  F/T-3  can change throughout the day, so it is last in consideration.  

<If there is just a slightest possibility, why don't they look further than the TSH?>

Many doctors do and it would be up to your doctor. Both F/Ts in how they relate to each other along with the TSH, tells the complete thyroid story if they are warranted. Such as late or early on set of autoimmune thyroid (Then antibodies are done to confirm autoimmune and possible other test as well), conversion problems or not, adrenal fatigue, Poor Mitochondrial,  and other problems such as allergies, hormonal imbalance, yeast,  chronic infection, generalized ill-health, sick euthyroid syndrome, starvation, other drug use and subclinical or mild hypo/hyper-thyroidism, etc., etc., etc. All relate in the F/Ts levels with TSH.

TSH and thyroid hormone levels vary during the day and from day-to-day during the week. It
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