Thyroid Disorders Community
How to control TSH level?
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This patient support community is for discussions relating to thyroid issues, goiter, Graves disease, Hashimoto's Thyroiditis, Human Growth Hormone (HGH), hyperthyroid, hypothyroid, metabolism, parathyroid, pituitary gland, thyroiditis, and thyroid Stimulating Hormone (TSH).

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How to control TSH level?

Hi Doctor,

My TSH Level is 9.59.Can you please suggest me,how I can decrease the level? How It will in limit.In this situation,which food I should take,and which I can not.

Regards
Shreya Chatterjee
Tags: TSH
649848_tn?1357751184
First of all, I'd like to let you know that there are no doctors monitoring this forum.  We are all patients, like yourself, who do our best to help each other.

Your TSH level indicates that you have hypothyroidism.  Is that the only test you had done?  If so, you need to ask your doctor to do Free T3 and Free T4, which are the actual thyroid hormones and are much more important than TSH, which is a pituitary hormone.

The pituitary gland constantly monitors the levels of thyroid hormones in your body and if it determines that those levels are too low, it produces Thyroid Stimulating Hormone (TSH) to try to stimulate the thyroid into producing more hormones.  If the thyroid doesn't respond, the pituitary keeps pumping out TSH and the lower the levels of thyroid hormones, the higher your TSH level will go.

If you have hypothyroidism, you should be started on a thyroid replacement medication, such as levothyroxine.  Ideally, once started on a replacement medication, your thyroid hormone levels will rise, which would make your TSH drop.

Along with the Free T3 and Free T4 tests, you should also be tested for thyroid antibodies to determine if you have Hashimoto's Thyroiditis. Hashimoto's is an autoimmune disease, in which the body sees the thyroid as foreign, and produces antibodies to destroy it.  If you have Hashimoto's, your thyroid will continue to produce less and less hormones, as the antibodies attack it. Eventually, your thyroid will not produce any hormones on its own and you would, then, be totally dependent on the replacement medication.

There is no cure for Hashimoto's, but the resulting hypothyroidism can be controlled quite well, if your doctor is willing to work with you and prescribe adequate medication to alleviate symptoms.
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