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Low tsh and Low free T4
Hello everyone. My tsh was high for about three years and then recently bottomed out to 0.00. My doc weaned me off slowly. He is a general MD. I see a endo about once a year, it is an hour drive. Well, my tsh is still low off the meds and now my free t4 is low. I am going to endo next week. My doc is clueless which is fine , but scarry. Another doc told me the same day that he had never seen anything like this before. Can anyone help me out! Info Please! Thanks!


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213044 tn?1236531060
When your TSH tested at 0.00, did you have a Free T4 test run? Was it high? Was it normal?
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213044 tn?1236531060
I'm going to break a trust and post some figures for the sake of clarity and expediency.

Your TSH was 0.06 and your Free T4 was 0.35 with a reference range of .59-1.17.

OK.

So your TSH was very low, and your Free T4 was very low, below limit, with a flag on the report noting it was low.

And your doctor took you off replacement hormones, when the test said you were low on replacement hormones. Does that sound like the right thing to do?

Now your TSH is still low and your Free T4 is getting lower?

You need to be back on medication.
You need to have some tests run on your pituitary gland.

If your thyroid hormones are low and the pituitary does not send lots of TSH to demand more hormones from the thyroid, it may be a pituitary problem.

You need to see that Endo soon. Call and let them know what is going on and make an appointment. If you have to wait weeks to get in, ask about going back on your medication.

That's just my opinion. A guess, at that.
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