Thyroid Disorders Community
Muscle Aches while sleeping or resting
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This patient support community is for discussions relating to thyroid issues, goiter, Graves disease, Hashimoto's Thyroiditis, Human Growth Hormone (HGH), hyperthyroid, hypothyroid, metabolism, parathyroid, pituitary gland, thyroiditis, and thyroid Stimulating Hormone (TSH).

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Muscle Aches while sleeping or resting

My muscles feel sore and achy (dull, not sharp) that I need to contract, massage or stretch them for some relief. My muscles aches are most intense during prolonged rest or during sleep. As I start to drift into sleep, my muscle aches start to intensify. During sleep, I feel it the most, tossing and turning. But the amazing thing is: if I wake up (and open my eyes), the muscle aches dramatically decreases.

It could be maddening sometimes.

I also get lightheaded when I stand from a seated position. I frequently wake up tired. My bones feel weak. I have back pain. I play a lot of basketball (an obsession), and I feel that playing places a lot of stress on my body when it shouldn't, because I am weak. Even though I am above average athletically, it takes me a long time to warm up. Sometimes I feel good. But when I go exercise, I crashed like for a week. Horrible.

I'm 22. This has been going on for the past 5 years. But during the past year, it's has gotten worst. Whereas before, it was just a minor annoyance.

I do everything right (sleep, diet, exercise, etc, I make sure.), and my blood work and heart echo were normal.

TSH: 4.36, 1.65, 2.97.  (normal range: 0.27-4.20)

They said thyroid function was perfectly normal.

I've had GAD since I could talk, so they suggested that may be the cause. But I was under a lot of stress during my school years, and I never remember feeling this way. They also suggested depression. But I know what true depression feels like, because I became depressed with suicidal thoughts "invading" my mind after I had a flu.

As a side note: I was very energetic and hyperactive before 16. Some teachers thought that I was on speed drugs, others thought that I had ADHD.
9 Comments Post a Comment
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Avatar_m_tn
*All my muscles, but mostly thighs ache.
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Avatar_f_tn
Except as a screening test in asymptomatic individuals, TSH is totally inadequate in the diagnosis of thyroid dysfunction.  TSH is a pituitary hormone, a very indirect measure of thyroid status.  FREE T3 and FREE T4 are the actual thyroid hormones, and their levels are much more important.  Bear in mind with any of these tests that just being in range is often insufficient.  For example, FT3 and FT4 often have to be midrange or above for hypo symptom relief.

Many thyroid conditions are characterized by an initial hyper phase (of varying length) followed by a brief return to "normal" and a hypo phase that may or may not be permanent.  You might seem to fit that pattern???

In addition to FT3 and FT4, thyroid antibodies should be tested.  Autoimmune thyroid disease is the most prevalent cause of thyroid dysfunction in the developed world.  These tests are TPOab (thyroid peroxidase antibodies) and TGab (thyroglobulin antibodies), the two markers for Hashi's (hypo, except in early stages) and TSI (thyroid stimulating immunoglobulin), the marker for Graves' (hyper).

FT3, FT4 and the antibody tests would give you a much more comprehensive picture of what your thyroid is doing.  They're all relatively inexpensive blood tests.

Have you tried magnesium for your aches?  

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Avatar_m_tn
I take One-A-Day brand, as directed. It has 30 %DV of magnesium.

Interesting about the initial hyper phase of thyroid conditions.
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Avatar_m_tn
And also, this reminds me of the first time I smoked weed (last new year's eve), and about half hour later, I all my muscles were aching, trembling , my heart was racing, lightheadedness, fatigue, and dry mouth. My friends told me that that the weed just made me super anxious. That made me wonder if the docs were right about blaming my symptoms on my GAD.
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798555_tn?1292791151
Magnessium in multi vits do nothing. If it is magnessium oxide, hardly none will be absorbed into the body.

Good magnessium is at least $10 per bottle, mag glycinate is best follwed by mag citrate, there are a few others that fall in between.
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Avatar_f_tn
I agree with Moose on the magnesium.  I just learned more than I ever wanted to know about mag, including that mag oxide can actually deplete your mag levels due to its laxative effect.  Mag oxide is what's in just about all multis.  RDA for mag is 400 mg of ELEMENTAL mag.  The different coumpounds deliver different amounts of elemental mag, with oxide taking up the rear, but none even comes close to delivering RDA, even though the label will tell you it does.

If you are hypo, mild depressants (like the weed) flood your brain with T3.  This can be a mood elevator for people suffering depression due to hyopthyroidism.  

The range your lab uses for TSH (0.27-4.20) is very broad (most labs use a range that we consider too broad).  A more reasonable range is 0.3-3.0.  Your first TSH is over both your lab's range and the top of the 0.3-3.0 range.  The last one is very close to top of range.  So, you are looking a little hypo according to TSH. TSH is also very volatile and can vary as much as 70% just with the time of day the blood was drawn.

If you've had GAD all your life, thyroid hormone imbalance could be exacerbating it.  Anxiety can be a symptom of both hypo and hyper.

I'd test further.  You've had two TSH tests that indicate hypo; you have symptoms; TSH has not added much more information.  



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Avatar_m_tn
I know that the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologist recommends a range of 0.3-3.0, but because I've always heard TSH fluctuation is normal,  I thought I shouldnt worry about it.  But I will look into that in the near future.
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Avatar_f_tn
TSH fluctuation is normal, which is part of the reason it's such a poor indicator of thyroid status.  However, it should vary "normally" within range.

I just want to emphasize my comment about your GAD with a personal example.  I've had tachycardia all my life due to a congenital heart defect.  All my life, I had episodes of tachy in the neighborhood of 3-4 per year.  Enter thyroid imbalance and meds, and my tachy went to 20-30 times per day.  My PCP told me there was NO WAY that thyroid was influencing it.  

When I finally found an endo, luckily, he was very aware of the connection.  So, if you've had this all your life, but it's worsened in any way, don't discount thyroid as a player.      

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Avatar_m_tn
And all the more reasons why I should go see a knowledgeable doc. Thank you. I appreciate your all your input.

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