Thyroid Disorders Community
Newly Diagnosed Hyperthyroidism
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This patient support community is for discussions relating to thyroid issues, goiter, Graves disease, Hashimoto's Thyroiditis, Human Growth Hormone (HGH), hyperthyroid, hypothyroid, metabolism, parathyroid, pituitary gland, thyroiditis, and thyroid Stimulating Hormone (TSH).

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Newly Diagnosed Hyperthyroidism

Hi, I just gave birth to a precious baby girl in October. In December I had a check up with my PCP and he ordered some labs for a suspected thyroid issue. I gained 45 lbs with my daughter and lost 50+ by January. I saw an Endocrinologist after the labwork came back saying it seemed to show hyperthyroidism. She ordered further bloodwork and it showed the same results. She is now telling me it may be post-partum (and will eventually turn to hypo- and I can just wait that out) or it could be Grave's. I am going in next week to do the uptake study. Can anyone share experiences here? How common is post partum? I've always had issues with weight loss/ poor energy/depression so I feel like it's been lurking for years but just unnoticed until I delivered the baby. I am going crazy right now trying to find the energy to be a good mom to my 4 month old, work full time, and not drive my fiance insane with my anxiety/depression/mood swings. I feel totally defeated most of the time, my body is working against me. And now I'm still waiting for a sign of treatment/help. Is my doctor dragging things out or am I just being impatient? Help me figure out if I'm really crazy or if this is normal please!!
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Avatar_m_tn
As I understand it, you can have some significant swings in thyroid levels during and right after pregnancy.   I would think that you should be back close to your normal by now.  

So, in view of your prior symptoms, I think you need to go in and get tested for the biologically active thyroid hormones, Free T3 and Free T4 (not the same as Total T3 and T4), along with TSH.  Free t3 is the most important because it largely regulates metabolism and many other body functions.  Scientific studies have also shown that Free T3 correlated best with hypo symptoms, such as the ones you listed, while Free T4 and TSH did not correlate.  If your doctor resists testing for FT3 and FT4, then you should insist on it and don't take no for an answer.  

The most important consideration for you is to make sure that you have  a good thyroid doctor that will treat you clinically by testing and adjusting FT3 and FT4 as necessary to relieve hypo symptoms, without being constrained by resultant TSH levels.  Symptom relief should be all important, not just test results.  

You should also be aware that just being anywhere within the references is frequently not adequate.  Many members, myself included,  report that symptom relief for them required that FT3 was adjusted into the upper third of its range and FT4 adjusted to around the midpoint of its range.

While at the doctor for testing, you should also request to be tested for Vitamin D, B12, and a full test panel for iron anemia.  
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