Aa
A
A
Close
935922 tn?1244819160
Ongoing problems, could it be thyroid disorder?
     Im 23 y/o female, and for the past 3 years or so I've been having a lot of trouble wih my health.  Starting with  light sensitivity, dizziness, faintness and heart palpitations.  Now it's progressed into foggy brain, sensitivity to light, blurred vision, intense pain in the backs of my eyes, peeling finger nails, horrible acne, hypoglycemia, crushing chest pain, trouble breathing, low blood pressure, shaking, weakness, chronic fatigue, heart skipping beats, rapid heart rate, low heart rate, an "acidic" feeling throuhout my body, tingling and numbness in hands/arms/legs/feet, depression...the list goes on, I've even had 2 miscarriages,
     I've seen numerous doctors over the last three years and possible diagnosises have ranged from Multiple Sclerosis, Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome, and anxiety,  I found clonopin (anxiety med) really helps with easing the palpitations, but that's about it.  I'm left with the other problems everyday, for three years.  
     Someone mentioned to me recently about thyroid disorders.  I kind of blew it off because I'm thinking heart/chest pain = heart problem.  But after reading up on thyroid disorders I nearly cried bc literally EVERY symptom I have was listed on there, even problems I've been having that felt unconnected or unimportant.  
     I went to my doctor today and told her I'd like a thyroid panel test.  She told me that they're done them before and they were normal, I then asked what normal was?  She threw a lot of jargon at me, leaving me a bit confused, I asked her for a print out my results and she didn't feel "it was necessary".  
     I'm sorry for this long post, but my question is, can I have normal thyroid results and still possibly have a thyroid problem?  I try to be proactive in treatment and diagnosis, but I'm afraid I'm coming off to my doctors as some kind of loony hypercondriact.  I would sincerely appreciate any help or insight anyone can offer.
    
Cancel
3 Answers
Page 1 of 1
Avatar universal
This is my suggestion...look for another doctor, get a second opinion.  The way I got the doctor I have and he's awesome...go online and look for ex: family doctor in your area, and then search for the 5 stars and contact them.  But doctors hate it when we go to sites that give out information.  I've had doctors tell me that you can't believe what is online.  Well that would go totally against WebMD and others, huh?

You are supposed to be able to have copies of any tests done on you!

According to all the symtoms you have I also have too.  I have been waiting so far 6 years...wondering when a diagnosis will be attached.  Nope yet. I have over all muscle weakness, and there are numerous times that I get stabbing pains...it attacks whereever it wants.  I have been thinking of going to Mystery Diagnosis...but my boyfriend thinkings that all my ailments are due to inactivity and that I need to try harder to listen and pay attention.  Cuz I will forget things like in split seconds.

I have looked on the WebMD site and Dementia like Alzheimers...and that scares me to death...there are many symtoms there too.  

All I know is that I went into this with the "feeling off" and now I'm here with these symtoms too.  My doctors assistant is looking things up for me, and trying to make any connections.

I wish I could offer you more information.
Comment
Cancel
Comment
Avatar universal
Comment
Comment
Submit Comment
Avatar universal
First thing is that your doctor is a loser.  Likely the only test she ran was TSH which is totally inadequate, she ignored your symptoms, and then she didn't want to give you a copy of the test results, which she is required to do upon your request.  Time to find a good thyroid doctor.

TSH is a pituitary hormone that is affected by so many variables that at best it is only an indicator, to be considered along with more important indicators such as symptoms and also levels of the biologically active thyroid hormones Free T3 and Free T4.  Of these Free T3 is the most important because it largely regulates metabolism and many other body functions.  Scientific studies have shown that Free T3 correlated best with hypo symptoms while Free T4 and TSH did not correlate at all.

A good thyroid doctor will treat a hypo patient clinically by testing and adjusting Free T3 and Free T4 as necessary to relieve hypo symptoms, without being constrained by resultant TSH levels.  Symptom relief should be all important, not just test results.

So, you need to be tested for Free T3 and free T4, along with TSH.  Also, since hypo patients are frequently low in other areas, you should test for Vitamin A, D, B12, ferritin and a full iron test panel.

If you can get those done and post results and their reference ranges, members will be glad to help interpret and advise further.
Comment
Cancel
Comment
Avatar universal
Comment
Comment
Submit Comment
1756321 tn?1377771734
Have you ever had your vitamin B12 tested?
Comment
Cancel
Comment
Avatar universal
Comment
Comment
Submit Comment
Your Answer
Avatar universal
Answer
Know how to answer? Tap here to leave your answer...
Answer
Submit Answer
A
A
Blank
Weight Tracker
Weight Tracker
Start Tracking Now
Thyroid Disorders Community Resources
RSS Expert Activity
233488 tn?1310696703
Blank
Marathon Running Done Over Many Yea...
05/15 by John C Hagan III, MD, FACS, FAAOBlank
233488 tn?1310696703
Blank
New Article on Multifocal IOL vs &q...
05/15 by John C Hagan III, MD, FACS, FAAOBlank
748543 tn?1463449675
Blank
TMJ/TMJ The Connection Between Teet...
01/15 by Hamidreza Nassery , DMD, FICOI, FAGD, FICCMOBlank
Top Thyroid Answerers
649848 tn?1424570775
Blank
FL
Avatar universal
Blank
MI
Avatar universal
Blank
Sisters, OR
Avatar universal
Blank
657231 tn?1453836403
Blank
Northern, NJ
Avatar universal
Blank
Calicut, India