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Parvovirus and Thyroid Disorder
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Parvovirus and Thyroid Disorder

I had had a few blood tests over the past month as I was getting very light headed and feinted a couple of times. My TSH level was found to be 0.7 and then down to 0.2 last week. Although this makes sense, as a lot of my symptoms recently (20lb weight loss, nausea, palpitations in throat, throbbing pain in throat, itchy skin) point towards hyperthyroidism. However, my T4 level was in the normal range (awaiting results of T3, thyroid ultrasound and CRP level).

What could be causing my extremely low TSH, but normal T4? Does the fact that I have been sent for an ultrasound and CRP test mean they are looking for goiters, nodules or cancer? I have been referred to an endocrinologist and I am awaiting notice of an appointment.

I was diagnosed with parvovirus B19 in May 2010, and have been suffering with chronic fatigue, muscle and joint pain for the past 7 months. I have been taking Elavil each night (10/20mg depending on pain). Could the thyroid problems be triggered by either the virus or the medication I have been taking.

I am a 27 year old female, 5'4, 120lbs.

Thank you for reading and I hope someone can give me some advice.

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649848_tn?1357751184
We would need to know the exact levels of your T4 and T3 tests, along with whether or not those are Free or Total tests.. Tests for Total T3 and Total T4 are obsolete and considered to be of very little value.  We would also need to know the reference ranges for these tests as indicated on your lab report, since these vary from lab to lab, so must come from your own report.

That said - "normal" T4 means only that your T4 (Free or Total?) was within the so-called "normal" ranges that your lab uses.  That doesn't mean it's "normal" for you.  

A quick search for Parvovirus B19, brings up a condition called Fifth Disease because of the distinctive rash produced.  My son was diagnosed with Fifth Disease when he was very young... and it resolved on its own, as is typical in children.

I also turned up the following:  "Parvovirus B19 infection may cause a serious illness in persons with sickle-cell disease or similar types of chronic anemia. In such persons, parvovirus B19 can cause an acute, severe anemia. The ill person may be pale, weak, and tired, and should see his or her physician for treatment. (The typical rash of fifth disease is rarely seen in these persons.) Once the infection is controlled, the anemia resolves. Furthermore, persons who have problems with their immune systems may also develop a chronic anemia with parvovirus B19 infection that requires medical treatment. People who have leukemia or cancer, who are born with immune deficiencies, who have received an organ transplant, or who have human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection are at risk for serious illness due to parvovirus B19 infection."

Here's where I got some of my information on Parvovirus B19:
http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dvrd/revb/respiratory/parvo_b19.htm

I'd wonder if your immune system was compromised before becoming infected with the parvo, and it's possible that the parvo has resolved, but thyroid issues are causing your fatigue, muscle and joint pain, rather than the parvo.  

All of that said, we would need to see the results of the T3 and T4 tests AND we'd need to know the reference ranges, along with whether they are Free or Total........ once we have that information, we can comment more fully on your situation.  

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Avatar_f_tn
Thank you for your post. When I was diagnosed with Parvo I was told that it is very common in children (fifths disease) and you are immune for life if you get it as a child. However, if you contract it as an adult it is sometimes more difficult to shake off and can cause arthritis-like symptoms, fatigue and auto-immune diseases. As it had such a bad effect on me I was tested for anemia, HIV and a few other things but they were all negative.

Curiously my TSH was tested in May while we were still diagnosing the Parvo and it was 'normal'. I am not sure what ranges they are using, or whether it is total/free T4/T3. I am waiting for a referral to an endocrinologist, so I will ask when I finally get an appointment.

thanks again.
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649848_tn?1357751184
Well, I went looking some more and turned up this little tidbit, which says Human Parvovirus B19 "does" cause autoimmune diseases; however, if I were you, I'd want to do a lot more research on the subject.

http://www.suite101.com/content/human-parvovirus-b19-infection-a17818

I found the information simply by "googling" the question: "does Human Parvovirus cause thyroid disease?".  It came up with links to several sites that appear to give all types of information.
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