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Right sided thyroid removal and thyroid function
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Right sided thyroid removal and thyroid function

I am due to have the right side of my thyroid removed in the next few weeks. How long after surgery would you expect thyroid function to decrease? My problem is I am going back to the UK to live in March and I am concerned about follow up care. I have been told that I might not need to take any replacement after surgery, but I wanted to know if I do need to when will this start to show in my blood work. Also the only medication that I know of that they use in the uk is Thyroxine. Does anyone know if this is the same as any medication used in the USA?  Any help would be greatly appreciated, I am totally freaking out about this surgery and don't know if I should just forget the whole thing.

Thank you for any advice

Alyson
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687408_tn?1228843011
Hey!  I just had the right side of my thyroid removed last Thursday.  My ENT put me on Thyroxine right away.  I only take 50 mcg.  It is spelled the same as the medicine you named above and I would assume it is the same medicine.  It is a generic version of synthroid.  My endo originally told me that I would not need meds if they only took one side.  The ENT said the opposite.  His rationale is that the left side would try to compensate and that could lead to more issues/goiter later in life.  So I agreed to take the meds.  So far, just a few issues of restlessness and insomnia that I'm told are completely normal as my body and metabolism try to get back to normal.  I have yet to get blood work done but my dr. said that the meds take about 6 weeks to show up.  As for the surgery, it was a piece of cake.  I have a very small incision and no stitches.  There is some swelling and my voice is a little hoarse but thats about it for physical issues.  I am more easily fatigued but, this too is improving.  I took pain meds for about 3 days but no longer need them.  I definitely prefer this to the difficulty swallowing and other symptoms.  My ENT had me take 1000 mg of calcium for 2 weeks prior to surgery to avoid any shock to my parathyroid glands and it seems to have worked.  If there are any other questions I can answer, please ask.
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Avatar_n_tn
Thank you so much for your reply, it is nice to hear from someone who has been through the surgery. When you say your ENT do you mean your surgeon? I saw my surgeon this week and he didn't mention anything about taking medication. Did you discuss this after your surgery or before? I am unsure of how the system works out here everything is connected in the UK so in someways it is easier, and the free part is a bit of a bonus too! After reading what you wrote I think that I would like to take the thyroxine after surgery too. One of my biggest concerns is being symptomatic after surgery so taking the thyroxine will help that. As far as insomnia goes I have that already, not sure if that is connected, it could just be the stress of worrying about the surgery.  What would you recommend I do about requesting the medication? Do I have to go back to my endo, or can I arrange it though the surgeon or my primary doctor. Sorry to ask such silly questions but I have no idea how the system works out here, I am still getting used to the idea of seeing a different doctor for everything.

Thank you again for your help
Alyson
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687408_tn?1228843011
My ENT also does aesthetic surgery.  The bonus is that he will monitor my medication and perform any necessary procedures.  Also helps that my scar is nearly non-existant.  Any time I write ENT, he is also the surgeon.  He told me that as long as I am cancer free, either he or my primary doctor can monitor my meds and an endo is not needed.  Good thing, because the endo I saw was smart but had 0 bedside manners.  We discussed meds in the consultation.  If your surgeon only handles the procedure part, either your endo or primary doctor should be able to prescribe the meds.   I am a fan of the meds post op.  I was uncertain at first, however, I was taking medication for narcolepsy (sleeping disorder I've had for 13 years) and no longer need it.  I may eventually have to go back to taking it once my thyroid stuff evens out but even then it will be a lesser dose.  I think I have attributed my fatigue and sleepiness to narcolepsy when the thyroid was also playing a part.  This is why insomnia for me is such a change from the norm.  Each day gets better and I have more and more energy.  I hope this trend continues!   Anyhow, I do a lot of research with doctors and tend to be a bit vocal about my care.  I have found that good doctors are out there but the patient has to know what to look for.  I hope you find/have found good people to take care of you.  If you are near Indiana, I can recommend a few!  Best of luck.
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215021_tn?1224886057
Hi there, I am in the UK and maybe can help answer a few of your worries.
You didn't say why you need a PT?
I had a PT back in April this year and had the left side of my thyroid removed due to a goiter.  It took me about three weeks to feel ok and by week 4 felt pretty good. Here in the UK the docs do not start you on any meds post surgery - the feeling is that the remaining thyroid can cope ok.  Mine didn't really and after feeling pretty lousy for a while and my TSH rising slowly I have started on LevoThyroxine 25mcgs.  So far this seems to be helping.
The main message here for you is once you return to the UK, register with a GP and then tell him you need a referral to a good Endo' in your area - even though you might not feel you need to see one straight away!  The waiting times on the NHS can be quite long and it's better to at least get onto an Endo's list before you REALLY might need to! Best to get your ducks lined up - if you know what I mean!
Also, if you must ask your GP to check your levels regularly - TSH T4 T3 Free T3 etc.
If you feel unwell or are having any symptoms of Hypo/hyper they need to have a reference for you.  The US lab results/ranges can be different from the Uk. It tends to be the 'practice nurses' who do the bloodwork so you need to be prepared to tell them what you actually want checked - Mine only ever did TSH but I now get the works!
Thyroxine seems to be the main drug they use to treat Thyroid problems - however - a good Endo will talk you through other options.
Please feel free to mail me on here if you want any other info/advice.
Best wishes and hope the op' goes well
J
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