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TSH/vitamin D levels
I'm a 49-year-old female and have just been feeling "off" and extremely fatigued.  TSH level was 9.36.  The vitamin D results, however, are confusing.  
1,25-Dihydroxyvit = H116 Unit: pg/mL;
Vitamin D3, 1,25 =116 Unit: pg/mL;
Vitamin D2, 1,25 = <8.  
Doc says that the TSH is high and I need treatment and the Vitamin D levels are okay but a little high.  I'm more concerned about the vitamin D level than the TSH.  Does anyone know if these levels are okay or what a 1,25-Dihyrorxyvit of 116 means?  
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My vitiam D3 was A 9, My Doctor put me on 50,000 mgs. once a week prescription for 6months and now I take it once every other week, and have to sit in the sun 15 min. a day. My Doctor put me on armor 30 mg. once a day, and mine was only .015 over and 3 other Doctors said I should not of been on thyoid med. and on top of it I have COPD, and any one with breathing problems should not take Armour. Almost killed me.
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1756321 tn?1377771734
1,25-dihydroxy vitamin D levels (1,25(OH)2 D) may be high in primary hyperparathyroidism, secondary hyperparathyroidism due to calcium deficiency or vitamin D deficiency, granulomatous diseases (eg: sarcoidosis), malignancies. 1,25(OH)2 D range: 15-75 pg/mL so 116 pg/mL is high.

25-hydroxy-vitamin D (25 (OH) D) test should be used to diagnose a vitamin D deficiency state. Vitamin D deficiency is very common with thyroid disease. In one study, 92% of patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis were vitamin D deficient. Check your labs to see if a 25-hydroxy-vitamin D (25 (OH) D) was requested by the doctor. If not, then that is one test to request.
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Just wanted to supplement the good comments above.  In view of your TSH test result and some symptoms, I think you need to be tested for the possibility of Hashimoto's Thyroiditis, which is the most common cause of diagnosed hypothyroidism.  With Hashi's the autoimmune system erroneously identifies the thyroid gland as "foreign" to the body and produces antibodies to attack and destroy the gland.  As this progresses over an extended period, the output of natural thyroid hormone diminishes and must be replaced with thyroid med.  

In order to get a better look at your thyroid status, you should be tested for the thyroid antibodies.  Those tests are TPO ab and TG ab.  Also, you should test for the biologically active thyroid hormones, Free T3 and Free T4 (not the same as Total T3 and T4).  Free T3 is the most important because it largely regulates metabolism and many other body functions.  Scientific studies have shown that Free T3 correlated best with hypo symptoms, while Free T4 and TSH did not correlate at all.  Two other tests I suggest are Vitamin B12 and ferritin.

If you will get those tests done and post results and reference ranges shown on the lab report, members will be glad to help interpret and advise further.

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