374933 tn?1291085384
TSI
What is Thyroid Stim Immunoglobulin?
It was on my most recent test and I don't remember seeing it before.
Shows I'm at 114 (<=125) % baseline.
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213044 tn?1236531060
You've GOT to be kidding me.
You came within days of RAI and you don't know what TSI is?

TSI is an antibody that tells you that you have Grave's disease.
So does it show a negative result? Less than upper limit, or "Normal"? Looks like a negative result to me.

I thought you had Grave's.
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213044 tn?1236531060
Thyroid Stimulating Immunoglobulin acts like TSH. It attaches to the TSH receptors in your thyroid, and tells it to make hormones. They flood your thyroid with false TSH and turn your thyroid on full throttle.
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374933 tn?1291085384
I'm an idiot.

You see the number this time......the last one  a year ago was 33.8.
I hadn't seen that test for a while and it's all mixed in with my Liver test for my HH.
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213044 tn?1236531060
I wonder what the upper limit is on the test.
That (<=125)% basline stuff confuses me.
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374933 tn?1291085384
Remember. I have an uptake study at 72%. Then I got over medicated with antithyroid drugs. I got off that and started with the whole hyper thing again and all of the symptoms.
Right before the RAI, I held it off and the next test started taking me towards normal. That 114 is taking me the bad way.

Check this chart half way down the page:
http://www.****.org.html
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314892 tn?1264627503
Check this out on the TSI test:
The TSI Test
TSI, which stands for thyroid stimulating immunoglobulin, is the antibody responsible for hyperthyroidism in Graves’ disease. TSI are also known as stimulating TSH receptor antibodies or stimulating thyrotropin receptor antibodies because of their ability to stimulate the TSH receptor on thyroid cells. Acting in place of TSH, these antibodies stimulate thyroid cells to produce excess thyroid hormone. TSI also contribute to the related eye disease, Graves’ ophthalmopathy. TSI is used to diagnose Graves’ disease, to monitor response to anti-thyroid drugs and to helping predicting remission. While the normal range is <130% activity, individuals who are normal do not produce TSI and have levels <2% activity. Individuals with levels between 2 and 125 %, which indicates thyroid autoimmunity, do not generally develop symptoms of hyperthyroidism until levels rise. Therefore, levels much lower than 125% are necessary to predict complete remission. Levels, which are close to 100% activity generally rise when patients stop taking anti-thyroid drugs. Ideally, levels would fall to at least 20% before anti-thyroid drugs are safely withdrawn. The reference range is <130% activity or an index of <1.3 for tests that measure the increased activity caused by adding patient serum to a test solution of thyroid cells.

http://graves.medshelf.org/Lab_Tests#The_TSI_Test


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213044 tn?1236531060
Thanks kitty. That explains a lot.
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277535 tn?1218139798
I guess I am one of the "not normal" individuals with less than 2%!!  Although I already knew that ;-)  My TSI is 91% which is high enough to make me paranoid with my elevated TPO antibodies.  

Got to love the whole thyroid autoimmunity issues.
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