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Thyroid problems and pregnant
I  am 14wk preg and recently found out I have hypothyroidism. I was then told that based off of my high TSH of 5.4, and t4 being .26 which is low, that I have hashimotos disease. They said I also have a goiter.  I saw an endocrinologist who did an additional test called Antithyroid antibodies. My test results came back today and said my thyroglobulin ab was at 1980 and my TPO AB was >1000, both flagging as high.

How high or bad is my antibodies test? 1980 sounds super high and has me scared. Is it still just hashimotos or could it be cancer or Myxedema?
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649848_tn?1424570775
First off, high TSH and low T4 are not what indicates Hashimoto's.  The goiter is consistent with Hashi and the antibody tests confirm it.  The actual number of antibodies doesn't really make it any worse; the simple fact that you have them is enough. Even though  your count is high, it's still just Hashimoto's.  Someone with antibodies of only 90 still has Hashimoto's and will go through the same things you are/will.

The hypothyroidism is caused by the antibodies destroying the thyroid.  The destruction will continue until  you no longer have healthy thyroid tissue, at which point, you will be completely reliant on replacement medication.  

What is the reference range for the T4?  And is that Free T4 or Total T4?  You need, also, to have a Free T3 test.  Free T3 is the hormone actually used by the individual cells.

Has your endo started you on medication to replace the hormones your thyroid no longer produces? Adequate thyroid hormones are essential for the proper growth/development of a fetus.

Always best to start out at the lowest dose and work up slowly, as you tolerate/need it.
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