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Training for distance running - Thyroid trouble
Hello.  I am hoping someone can help me with some advice.  I am a 41yo woman with an excellent health history.  I started running athletically last year, I am training for a marathon.  I work in health care.  Recently I ran a long course and afterward experience symptoms similar to those I had when diagnosed with a goiter and hyperthyroid problems at the begining of my last pregnancy: increased heart rate, fatigue, headache, light sensitivity, anxiety.  I ran my own labs:  TSH = 0.384, Free T4 = 1.17, Free T3 = 3.0, and Antithyroglobulin antibody = 131.  My non-fasting triglycerides are at 44.  My symptoms were bad for about ten days, then improved and I have been feeling mostly better the past week, but not great.  I went for another long run today and felt O.K. but did not have nearly my normal level of energy.  I wear a heart rate monitor to track my running statistics and was surprised to find when I got home that my heart rate for the last third of my run jumped suddenly to consistently over 200 (max 240) compared to my normal 140 or so.  Again, I feel O.K. but not great and my heart rate is still a little high several hours later (85 vs. my normal 60-65).    

I realize my labs are somewhat subclinical.  I want to keep training.  I am a breastfeeding mom. Would you advise me to seek treatment?  Is it likely that I would be started on PTU?  Should I just wait and repeat my TSH if my symptoms worsen?  Will I cause muscle damage, or moreover, is it likely that I am endangering my health to continue training?  I have been trying L-Carnitine and have been thinking that it perhaps helps somewhat with the headache.  After my run today I am wondering whether I should be more concerned about my heart.  I'm at a point in my life when I really don't want to have to slow down and stop running if I can avoid it.  Please tell me your thoughts.  I really appreciate it!
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Often with breast feeding the thyroid levels will be slightly different to when you are not lactating. This has to do with the Pituitary gland issuing orders to the thyroid to step up the pace for the prolactin to provide milk. The body needs a higher metabolism when breast feeding.
   It would be best to record your heart rates at least a weeks worth, to see if there are any changes. Often our hearts and blood pressures go up (or down depending on the person) when we are tired. So it could have just been a one off with what you noticed.
   You are best to increase the calcium as running puts alot of stress on the bones and especially as you are breastfeeding too.
     It could be that you are getting a repeat of your symptoms and only you know your body the best. I would personally keep a record of when you notice the symptoms, keep a track of the heart monitor and get tested again for the levels soon and then you can see if there is any obvious changes.
  Keep running!
Cheers
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