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consistent hyperplastic nodules (thyroid) and bipolar link?
My 19 year old was diagnosed with consistent hyperplastic nodules in his thyroid about 3 years ago, and has to have ultrasounds every year.  He had a needle biopsy 3 years ago.  He has just recently been diagnosed as bipolar, but I'm sure the GP hasn't done thyroid tests on him.  I've been reading about the possible link between thyroid disease and bipolar.  He's had violent mood swings, inability to concentrate, gets extremely overwhelmed with the smallest demand/task, sleeps 18 hours, up for 3 and then sleeps another 8 hours.  Or up all night.  I suspect he's rapid-cycling.  Anyway..... does anyone know of cases with his thyroid condition and a link to bipolar?  I'm going to go to our GP (luckily we have the same one) and insist on thyroid tests before we go too much further with bipolar meds.  So far not on any mood stabilizer---just Tevo-Divalproex, but I don't know much about it yet.  He's being weaned off Pristiq for the misdianosis of depression.
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Sorry that I can't provide much info on that subject, but this is a link that I had run across some time ago.  

http://www.psycheducation.org/thyroid/introduction.htm

I think you have a good idea in doing the thyroid tests.  I suggest that you request tests for Free T3 and free T4 (not Total T3 and T4), along with TSH they always test.  Might also be good to test for Reverse T3.  Also, be aware that a test that falls in the low end of the range may not be adequate.  If you can get those tests done and will please post results and reference ranges shown on the lab report, members will be glad to help interpret.

Also, here is some more info about hypothyroidism and depression.

http://synthroidhaters.wordpress.com/2009/08/12/depression-explored-with-dr-barry-durrant-peatfield/
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1756321 tn?1377771734
Common misdiagnoses of hypothyroidism include depression, dementia, schizophrenia, or bipolar disorder (especially rapid-cycling bipolar disorder). The two most common causes of primary hypothyroidism are Hashimoto's thyroiditis (autoimmune condition) and overtreatment of hyperthyroidism.
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