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I hit the top of my head.
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I hit the top of my head.

This is just recent.

I recently hit my head when I was helping my mother bringing the laundry downstairs. As we got in the laundry room we put the stuff down and my mother placed the green lawn chair to hold the door. Now the doors at the apartment buildings are heavy to push. My mother told me she forgot her coins so she told me to go back to the apartment and get them. Seeing the lawn seat facing at me, I wanted to jump over it because it looks convenient to do so. Very little did I know that the ceiling above the top of the door was lowered. Either that or I did not know my own height.

Anyways the top of my head hits the ceiling above and I hear something that sounds like when two hands clap together, basically a smack. I bounce off and stood on the ground (forgot how I landed) and felt little pain.

As I begin writing this question, my head feels a little warm. So my question is:

What happens when I hit the top of my head?
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1 Comment
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424549_tn?1308519102
Ooo, interesting question!

How are you feeling?

I think I'll take a try at this. I think we've got to look at physiology and pathophysiology.

First: Wound.
A wound is fought off by the body by sending out extra attention to the site - bloodcells are continuosly woorking to clean up aroudn the damaged tissue - even a bruise gets that response.

Second: Headtrauma
Any trauma to the head does make a whole lot of blood. If you should be as unfortunate as hitting a hole you'd bleed a lot. Sometimes when there is tissue damage around the scalp, the blood will have to get somewhere to go. It isn't much place in there. Because of this lack of space, the blood would go where it can: Down - and that might as well give you a bruise around an eye. That often looks a bit scary, but it will go back.

You'll probably hear about brain contusions and concussions... That is because that when we hit our heads, there isn't only one thing that happens.
You bump your head into something - it stops abruptly. The scalp will of course stop right there, just like you feel that you do. The brain, which is softer, will continue to move since it has a little space around it. It's like dropping a piece of Jell-O to the floor: It will stop but you see that it has energy left.
It bounces back of course. The brain doesn't really get smothered. Good huh?

What you should think of is: Are there signs of increased pressure to the brain after the trauma? (Memory loss, confusion, nausea etc).
Symptoms will come along with the pressure: The more pressure, the more symptoms.

Hmmm, I hope I didn't ramble off too much, and there's probably even more than this that happens.

Take care,
Florena
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