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Liver failure and swelling , burning and pain in feet, inability to wal...
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Liver failure and swelling , burning and pain in feet, inability to walk...

Male, 30 years old sent to Peidmont Hospital ,thought to have PSC, told needed a liver transplant, few days later realized patient could not walk, Neuro Dr. called in. Saw some inflamation (inflammation) in the lower spine, feet were swelled and very sore felt like they were burning..... Tested for Gillian Berre(sp) syndrome, lots of rare diseases, Finally nerve condution study was done, Nerves in arms were OK but legs had been affected... Was told the only way we could know what it was an how to treat it was to take a biopsy of nerve in foot, This was one month ago and we still do not know what caused this,, Was told before biopsy that a weak positive test for a rare form of systemic loupos   came back but were not sure that's it...Patient was given a 50/50 chance for liver to heal // It is getting better every day and patient is going to rehab and walking on a walker, Can you give us any suggestions.....
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The patient has experienced a radical change in circulation to the feet as a result of changes in the blood's ability to flow. To prevent the loss through the arterial walls of fluid that accompanies the swelling of the liver that blocks the hepatic artery, Blood surface tension and viscosity will be modified to prevent seepage, but the change also creates problems with capillary flow in the extremities, and the feet are effected first. The circulation will improve with treatment of the liver that reduces swelling. Rehabilitation will bring back some feeling and full function of the feet. While some nerves may be lost permanently, others will take over as sensors that assist balance and performance. The patient will be left with a feeling like sand in the shoes when he walks, but, in time, the feeling will be hardly noticed.
Be sure to test blood sugar constantly. Increased blood sugar is a common method used by the body to alter blood fluid dynamics; thus the development of neuropathy in diabetics.

Meditation, the use of effective pain blockers (as opposed to pain killers), and mild exercise will return full function with minimal discomfort.
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