Urology Community
Stents and Pelvic Radiation
About This Community:

This patient support community is for discussions relating to urology issues, benign prostate disease, penis curvature, cystisis, pediatric urology, prostate, sexual dysfunction and urological cancers.

Font Size:
A
A
A
Background:
Blank
Blank
Blank
Blank Blank

Stents and Pelvic Radiation

I underwent pelvic radiation.  Prior to radiation it was noticed from a ct that the tumor was pushing on my ureters causing backup in the kidneys.  I had stents put in they were the hard type and had continual uti's, major blood loss, and alot of pain.  I couldn't keep going with my treatment and had to get them removed.  Once removed, life was good again.  I went for follow-up 2 months after getting them removed and there is backup again.  

My urologist put in softer stents but I am still having quite a bit of pain with them.  He prompted me that I would need to have stents indefinately b/c the scar tissue is now what is pushing on the ureters.  He said we needed to figure out a long term plan over the next year or so.   He mentioned ballooning them open.  I can't find any info on this online.  Are there any resources out there?  Or any other alternatives?

I have 2 very active young children.  The pain and the *need* to pee every 45 minutes is really effecting my quality of life.
Related Discussions
Avatar_dr_f_tn
Hi,

It would be great if you could also post the type and location of the tumor that you had. This will provide an idea as to what part of the urinary tract is being constricted and evaluation for the appropriate corrective measures can be discussed.

Obstruction to the outflow of urine in the ureters can cause increasing pressure on the renal pelvis and can cause dilatation of the ureters and the pelvis of the kidney. The amount of pressure caused by the obstruction can also cause pressure-induced damage to the cortical part of the kidney and can impair kidney function. This can result in kidney failure over time.

Ballooning is used for dilatation of strictures of the ureters due to scar tissue arising within the lumen of the ureter. For factors that are causing external compression, it would be better to treat those factors than to intervene at the ureter level. Any prosthetic or indwelling substance will induce some amount of inflammatory reaction in the body and this could be the reason why you were unable to tolerate the stents.

You should discuss excision of the scar tissue if it is outside the ureters and if the scarring is within the ureters and causing a stricture, you can go ahead with the ureteral dilatation.

Do keep us posted on your doubts and progress.


Blank
Post a Comment
To
Blank
Weight Tracker
Weight Tracker
Start Tracking Now
Urology Community Resources
RSS Expert Activity
242532_tn?1269553979
Blank
How to Silence Your Inner Critic an...
Apr 16 by Roger Gould, M.D.Blank
242532_tn?1269553979
Blank
Emotional Eaters: How to Silence Yo...
Mar 26 by Roger Gould, M.D.Blank
1344197_tn?1392822771
Blank
Vaginal vs. Laparoscopic Hysterecto...
Feb 19 by J. Kyle Mathews, MD, DVMBlank
Top Urology Answerers
168348_tn?1379360675
Blank
ChitChatNine
4851940_tn?1385441629
Blank
jemma116
United Kingdom