Urology Community
atonic bladder
About This Community:

This patient support community is for discussions relating to urology issues, benign prostate disease, penis curvature, cystisis, pediatric urology, prostate, sexual dysfunction and urological cancers.

Font Size:
A
A
A
Background:
Blank
Blank
Blank
Blank Blank

atonic bladder

i have been diagnosed with an atonic bladder. most likely cause seems to be overstretched bladder caused by not voiding regularly enough and not using muscles enough. i have a large and floppy bladder and can hold more than 1 litre of urine before any desire to void and cannot void below 1 litre.
i have recurrent uti and use isc twice daily. i have been advised to increase the frequency of isc which i shall do.
i would like to know if there is anything know that i can do to reduce my bladder size or increase my bladder muscle to try to reverse condition. if i try hard i can void a small amount with approx 500ml urine in the bladder. the actual bladder muscles themselves can  be contracted easily and the sphincter muscle will relax if enough pressure brought on it.

thank you for your attention
Related Discussions
Avatar_f_tn
Hi,
     How are you? Atonic bladder, or flaccid bladder, occurs when the bladder becomes dilated and fails to empty properly. The dilated bladder can be stretched by excess urine buildup, leading to overflow leakage and damage to the bladder walls. Other bladder problems such as urinary tract infections can occur because of urine pooling and subsequent bacterial growth in the flaccid bladder.

Management of atonic bladders centers around the need to empty the bladder before overflow leakage or stretching occurs. Catheterization on a regular basis is often used. For patients who cannot self-catheterize, other options exist. Credé is a bladder voiding technique in which the patient manually presses down on the bladder. In effect, this squeezes the urine out of the bladder. Valsalva, another technique, works by using the abdominal muscles as if having a bowel movement. This puts pressure on the bladder, and forces urine out.

Surgical interventions are limited, but available. Bladder augmentation increases the bladder's storage capacity, lengthening the time periods between catheter use. A portion of the large intestine is removed and fitted onto the bladder to create additional capacity.
Another surgical procedure called Mitrofanoff creates a passage using the appendix so that catheterization may be performed through the abdomen rather than the urethra. This makes self-catheterization easier for some patients.
Consult your urologist and discuss the possible options.
All the best.
Blank
Post a Comment
To
Blank
Weight Tracker
Weight Tracker
Start Tracking Now
Urology Community Resources
RSS Expert Activity
242532_tn?1269553979
Blank
How to Silence Your Inner Critic an...
Apr 16 by Roger Gould, M.D.Blank
242532_tn?1269553979
Blank
Emotional Eaters: How to Silence Yo...
Mar 26 by Roger Gould, M.D.Blank
1344197_tn?1392822771
Blank
Vaginal vs. Laparoscopic Hysterecto...
Feb 19 by J. Kyle Mathews, MD, DVMBlank
Top Urology Answerers
168348_tn?1379360675
Blank
ChitChatNine
4851940_tn?1385441629
Blank
jemma116
United Kingdom