Urology Expert Forum
can atypical cells be present in urine without bladder cancer
About This Forum:

Questions in the Urology forum are answered by medical professionals at Healthcare Magic. Topics covered include benign prostate disease, penis curvature, cystisis, kidney stones, pediatric urology, prostate, sexual dysfunction, urinary tract infections (UTI), and urological cancers.

Font Size:
A
A
A
Background:
Blank
Blank
Blank
Blank Blank

can atypical cells be present in urine without bladder cancer


  I have resantly been diagnosed with cronic (chronic) systitus I received ( IVP)
  and all nessasary support blood and urine work the blood and tests were fine, but urine came back with atypical cells I was reffurred to a uroligist
  who did systiscope test found bladder red inflamed ordered byopsy byopsy came back no cancer
  (Question)
   if I still have atypical cells, do I still have cancer some where? or can atypical cells be present without being cancer Thank you Ronn
Related Discussions
Avatar_n_tn

Dear Ron,
A patient with chronic cystitis deserves a work-up to rule out an anatomical cause and to rule out cancer as a cause of irritative symptoms.  Your doctors have begun the appropriate work-up and it appears that you do not have cancer.  The result of an atypical cytology could be a result of the infection or instrumentation of the bladder(cystoscopy). If the bladder and upper tracts are thoroughly examined, which in your case they have; your chance of having a significant cancerous lesion is very small.  I do think that after your cystitis has been treated with an appropriate course of antibiotics you should have the cytology repeated.
The fact that your doctor performed random biopsies of your bladder means that he wanted to pursue this work-up to the end and put this issue to rest for you.  Since the random biopsies are negative for cancer, and they show some chronic infection, you can feel secure about being cancer free.
Some of the other related risk factors or common causes of bladder cancer are smoking, industrial carcinogens(rubbers and textiles),pelvic radiation,Schistisomiasis, and cyclophosphamide exposure.  The peak age is in the sixth to eighth decades and is rare before the age of forty.  Males are three times as likely as females to develop the disease.
It sounds like you probably have cystitis and for a male you need to know why you have this problem.  In regards to possible cancer of the bladder, I think your doctors are on top of the situation, and they will follow you as closely as necessary.  It is still possible to have an early stage cancer that cannot be seen or carcinoma in situ, a type of superficial bladder cancer, but with all of your negative studies and biopsies, there is nothing else for your doctors to do at this time other than follow you in the future.
This information is provided for general medical educational purposes only.  Please consult your physician for diagnostic and treatment options pertaining to your specific medical condition.  More individualized care is available at the Henry Ford Hospital and its satellites (1 800 653-6568).
Sincerely,
HFHS M.D.-AK
*keyword:Bladder cancer





0 Comments
Blank
Avatar_f_tn
A related discussion, Urine Cytology was started.
Continue discussion Blank
This Forum's Experts
351246_tn?1379685732
Dr. Kokil MathurBlank
Consultant
,
563773_tn?1374250139
Bhupinder Kaur, MDBlank
Private practice
,
MedHelp Health Answers
Blank
Weight Tracker
Weight Tracker
Start Tracking Now
RSS Expert Activity
242532_tn?1269553979
Blank
How to Silence Your Inner Critic an...
Apr 16 by Roger Gould, M.D.Blank
242532_tn?1269553979
Blank
Emotional Eaters: How to Silence Yo...
Mar 26 by Roger Gould, M.D.Blank
1344197_tn?1392822771
Blank
Vaginal vs. Laparoscopic Hysterecto...
Feb 19 by J. Kyle Mathews, MD, DVMBlank