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vitamin deficiency??
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Vitamins are substances that your body needs to grow and develop normally; if you have low levels of certain vitamins, you may develop a deficiency disease. Supplements can also be important to provide your body with extra nutrients depending on the activities you do. Discuss topics including vitamin deficiency, food to counter vitamin deficiency, sufficient vitamin levels, and supplements.

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vitamin deficiency??

I BECAME SICK LAST OCT. FELT LIKE I HAD A COLD AND LITTLE ENERGY.ALSO DEVELOPED LUMPS UNDER EACH ARMPIT  AREA THE SIZE OF 1/2 MEDIUM PEACH. THEN MY ENERGY ALMOST TOTALLY LEFT. THEY THOUGHT I HAD MONONUCLEOSIS BUT I WAS 64.I WAS POSITIVE FOR ALL THE VIRUSES THEY CHECKED ME FOR.(I'VE BEEN A NURSE FOR 47 YEARS).
IT'S BEEN ALMOST A YEAR AND WE'VE DISCOVERED THAT I HAVE A B12 AND VITAMIN D DEFICIENCY. MY ENERGY LEVEL STILL COMES AND GOES. I CAN'T WORK MUCH FOR OBVIOUS REASONS. I JUST SAW A HEMATOLOGIST BECAUSE MY WBC'S HAVE CONT'D TO RUN 12-14,000. I'M NOT ANEMIC.
SHE DID CT SCANS FROM THE NECK DOWN BECAUSE SHE COULDN'T LOCATE PROMINENT LYMPH NODES AND WANTED TO SEE WHAT THEY WERE DOING. ALL OK AND SHE DOESN'T HAVE ANY ANSWERS.
ANY SUGGESDTIONS?
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1236893_tn?1408490528
I'm assuming you're taking B12 shots and get 15 minutes of sun per day or a D3 vitamin.
  natural, injectable vitamin B12 inject 1 milligram (mg) of The absorption of vitamin B12 is a complex process. B12 must be cleaved from its protein carriers by an acidic pH of the stomach. If you take antacids or use any acid-blocking medications, such as Nexium, Prilosec, AcipHex, or Zantac, you will not free vitamin B12 for absorption Also, a protein, called intrinsic factor, must be produced in the stomach to bind with vitamin B12
to aid in its absorption. Patients who take acidblocking medications will not produce intrinsic factor and are destined to become B12-deficient. An adult body stores approximately 2 mg to 5 mg of vitamin B12. Most of that (80 percent) is stored in the liver. Vitamin B12 is continually utilized in the body in the production of energy, digestion of proteins and fats, and the manufacture and protection of DNA. It must be continually
replenished or symptoms of deficiency can manifest. It is estimated that vitamin B12 deficiency affects 10 percent to 15 percent of individuals over the age of 60. Remember, if you take an acid-blocking medication, you are guaranteed to have low vitamin B12. In fact,  it's rare that someone on an antacid medication does not have a severe vitamin B12
deficiency. There are many reasons why you can be low in
vitamin B12 and feeling the many effects of the lack of it. These include: Pernicious anemia, an autoimmune condition where not enough red blood cells are produced. It
is caused by a lack of vitamin B12. Long-standing pernicious anemia can be devastating; it slowly disintegrates the stomach lining. If pernicious anemia
is not treated with vitamin B12, it can result in death. Intestinal infections and autoimmune illnesses of the gastrointestinal tract, such as Crohn’s disease, can cause pernicious anemia. Atrophic gastritis results from decreased stomach-acid production, which causes a chronic inflammation of the lining of the stomach. It is more common in the elderly and those with an autoimmune disorder. H. pylori infection can cause atrophic gastritis. Stomach surgery is common cause of vitamin B12 deficiency. All patients who undergo stomach surgery need to have their vitamin B12 status evaluated, or better yet, to supplement with injectable vitamin B12  Celiac disease and gluten sensitivity can cause
vitamin B12 deficiency. Cancer patients often suffer from B12 deficiency
Nearly every bodily system is affected by B12 deficiency, including the neurologic, hematologic, immunologic, vascular, gastrointestinal, musculoskeletal, and genitourinary system. The list of vitamin B12-deficient illnesses is almost endless and includes Alzheimer’s disease, depression, mania, psychosis,4 neuropathies, body aches and pains, transient ischemic attacks, infertility, heart disease, urinary incontinence, migraine headaches, Bell’s palsy, and restless legs. There are many more. Vitamin B12 deficiency can cause irreversible damage in the body. This is especially true with the nervous system. Unfortunately, there are no absolute levels of vitamin B12 that have been shown to either cause or prevent this irreversible damage. What happens in nervous tissue with vitamin B12 deficiency? The nerve tissue becomes swollen and the surrounding coating that protects the nerves myelin  breaks down. In late phases, the nerve tissue becomes sclerotic (it hardens). Patients can experience a myriad of symptoms
with vitamin B12 deficiency. This can include fatigue, depressed mood, impaired perception of touch, nerve pain, headaches, slower reflexes, irritability, inability to focus, poor concentration, and suicidal tendencies, as well as body aches and pains. There is no one common symptom for vitamin B12 deficiency. Because of the multitude of symptoms, physicians rarely think any of the above disorders are related to
vitamin B12 deficiency. That is why it is missed so often in medicine today. How to Test
For Vitamin B12 The testing available for vitamin B12 is subpar. All of the tests can read
in the “normal” range and the patient can still have a B12 deficiency. This is because we have no way to measure the B12 level inside of the cells, where it is supposed to work.  
it is much more important to institute a therapeutic trial of injectable vitamin B12 if a patient is suffering from any of the symptoms above. The therapeutic trial (1 mg of natural vitamin B12 injected daily for 14 to 30 days) is inexpensive and extremely safe.
Homocysteine levels may be an indirect marker for B12 deficiency. elevated homocysteine levels improve when given vitamin B12 shots. However, you can have
normal or even low homocysteine levels and still be vitamin B12-deficient.
There is a standard vitamin B12 test. Yet the range reported by the lab is much too broad.
most patients do better when vitamin B12 levels are greater than 500 pg per ml. Many patients with levels greater than 500 pg/ ml might still be deficient in vitamin B12 and may
receive positive benefits from supplementation. Urinary or serum methyl malonic acid (MMA) is thought to be a more sensitive way to test for a deficiency of vitamin B12.  
within the normal range yet had a marked positive The testing costs more than $100. it is much better to have a therapeutic trial of vitamin B12 — and much
less expensive — at around $25 for a bottle of 30 injections.Vitamin B12 is incredibly safe and inexpensive. If it doesn’t work, the patient is not out a lot of money
and no harm is done. There would be a lot less misery in the healthcare world if all the patients who might be vitamin B12-deficient were given a trial of
injectable, natural vitamin B12 daily for 30 days.
There are many oral versions of vitamin B12. These supplements will, most of the time, elevate vitamin B12 levels in either the blood or urine testing. Younger patients (generally less than 20 years old) do well on oral versions of vitamin B12. They usually have a better oral absorption compared with older patients.
There are several versions of injectable vitamin B12 available: cyanocobalamine,
hydroxycobalamine, methylcobalamine, or adenosylcobalamine (the “cobalamine” is from
the cobalt molecule attached to the vitamin). Most conventional physicians use injectable vitamin B12 as cyanocobalamine. However, this form should
never be used. It is a synthetic form of vitamin B12 and has no place being injected, considering that there are natural versions available. If you have a condition known as Leber’s hereditary optic neuropathy, use of cyanocobalamine can make it worse. In addition, it contains small amounts of the toxic agent cyanide. If you have problems with
your liver or in detoxing items, the use of a product with cyanide is one more negative item with which your body has to deal.
The natural forms of injectable vitamin B12 are known as adenosylcobalamine, hydroxycobalamine, and methylcobalamine.
These forms of injectable vitamin B12 are available from a compounding
pharmacy. A 30 cc bottle costs approximately $25 (for hydroxy- and methylcobalamine).
Adenosylcobalamine costs more.
Out of the three natural versions, I would suggest using methylcobalamine. It is slightly more active than hydroxycobalamine and also supplies the much-needed “methyl” groups for the body’s needs in methylation.



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Avatar_m_tn
From a natural medicine standpoint, what you seem to have had was a virulent virus that you're having trouble recovering from.  The B12 and D problems are probably unrelated to what you're reporting, and can be easily dealt with by supplementation from a good health food store until your levels return to normal.  B12 deficiency is common with vegetarians, so if you are it could be that as well.  The above tells you the form to take, but it only needs to be injected if you're severely depleted of it -- a good sublingual will work fine if you're just low.  Now, about the rest, I'd look into a formula by Herb Pharm called lomatium hypericum, which is for persistent viruses, one by Herbalist and Alchemist called Fu Zheng, an adaptogenic formula to rebuild the body's strength after a major health problem, and something to rebuild your immune system, such as Gaia's astragalus formula.  These are just suggestions; a naturopath or herbalist or holistic nutritionist can monitor and help better.  The problem with allopathic medicine is that, while they're good at killing things, they're not very good at building the body back up again as they don't learn anything about nutrition in med school that's of much use.  For that, you have to go back to older forms of medicine.  Obviously, if you're on any medications, you'll have to check for contraindications, and these are only suggestions for an approach that might help and might not.  Something else to consider is a liver cleanse, though you sound like you might still be too weak for that.  Now, if it wasn't a virus, other remedies might be better than the lomatium hypericum, but you seem to suggest it was a viral infection.  Bacterial infections are a whole other ballgame.  I hope this helps suggest that if doctors can't help you, it isn't the end of the story -- Hippocrates was largely an herbalist, after all.
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1468062_tn?1286476893
See an endrocrinologist
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