Women's Health Community
Surgery for a uterine septum
About This Community:

This patient support community is for discussions relating to women's health issues, including bone health, gynecologic cancers, genetic testing, heart disease, infectious diseases, work issues, mammograms, reproductive health, sexuality, domestic abuse and sexual violence.

Font Size:
A
A
A
Background:
Blank
Blank
Blank
Blank Blank

Surgery for a uterine septum

I am getting ready for another surgery for a septum. I am really thinking of getting a second opinion. My doctor is a infertility specialist but didn't seem too confident about doing the surgery. He does 4 a year. I wished he was more positive.
My first surgery with him wasn't successful. I had major adhesions from my 2 previous d/c's that was preformed by another doctor. During the removal of my adhesions he puctured my uterus, so the removal of my septum wasn't done so that is why for a second surgery.
I feel like I can't find a doctor that I am comfortable with.
Related Discussions
4 Comments Post a Comment
Blank
Avatar_n_tn
I know this response is a little late...but...

You can always get a second opinion!  

Also:

The septum does not have a normal blood supply. It is believed that if a fertilized egg implants on the outer wall of the uterus, it will do just fine. But if it implants on the septum, the placenta may not get enough blood, and this may result in miscarriage or premature labor and early delivery. Removing the septum does not affect anything other than enabling a fertilized egg to implant in a healthier spot.  

The septum can easily be treated by an outpatient surgical procedure called hysteroscopic resection, in which a doctor cuts out the septum. The procedure is usually performed under general anesthesia, but an epidural anesthetic can be used. The doctor may choose to insert a catheter into the uterus to prevent the separate walls of the uterus from joining again with scar tissue. You may also be placed on hormones to speed healing. Success rates from this surgery is high, and most women require no postoperative pain medication.

If you are having problems holding onto pregnancies, this may be a good option for you!

If you are uncomfortable with your doctor, dont do it!  Go to another doctor until you find one you ARE comfortable with.  

Good luck!

Blank
Avatar_m_tn
For those who found this on a search...

A septum of greater than 2cm can cause more problems than miscarriage.

But don't take my word for it, read the medical studies:

http://humrep.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/full/21/4/1047

humrep.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/reprint/11/4/727.pdf

I'll summarize...

Proven problems with a septum over 2 cm can include;

*Higher rates of Miscarriage ( loss before 20 weeks)

*Higher rates of Still birth ( loss after 20 weeks)

*Higher rates of pre-term birth.

* Higher numbers of babies with Low birth weight.

*Higher risks of Malposition of the fetus.

*Higher rates of breached birth.

* Higher rates of medically required C-sections.

* Infertility - this may be as adhesions limit the uterine muscular activity, thereby reducing the perfusion of sex steroids to the endometrium, with atrophy as a consequence.

* A septum of over 2cm may result in weakness during uterine enlargement in pregnancy. This can lead to the is rare complication of postoperative uterine rupture.

* Bad menstrual pain - cramping around a hard structure which isn't meant to be there can cause unnecessary pain. ( That last one is in a different study I can't find a link to just now)


-------------------------

So that's what the medical journals say, personally I had a very large septum which had to be removed over two operations, and it most certainly did require medication for pain management and due to heavy bleeding a total of two weeks bed rest.  I'm an usual case.  Every woman and every septum is different. Good luck to all who are considering an operation for this condition.
Blank
Avatar_m_tn
Viki said "most women require no postoperative pain medication. "

Not true. You are thinking of a diagnostic hysteroscopy - i.e, using the scope to look for problems.

An OPERATIVE hysteroscopy uses the scope to guide surgical instruments in the removal of tissue. It causes bleeding and pain.  

And most patients are prescribed pain killers, like vicodin and motrin in combination, and I would be amazed if a woman could go through that and not take at least over the counter meds.

Blank
Avatar_n_tn
I have had 4 miscarriages altogether due to uterus septem and a son born at 31wks i have just got septum taken out which i have recovered well from and have had a mirena inserted for 3 months then hopefully can try again without any more problems wish you all the best of luck would love to hear more success stories hard to find them and will hopefully have my own one day!
Blank
Post a Comment
To
Blank
Weight Tracker
Weight Tracker
Start Tracking Now
Women's Health Community Resources
RSS Expert Activity
233488_tn?1310696703
Blank
New Cannabis Article from NORTH Mag...
Jul 20 by John C Hagan III, MD, FACS, FAAOBlank
242532_tn?1269553979
Blank
3 Reasons Why You are Still Binge E...
Jul 14 by Roger Gould, M.D.Blank
242532_tn?1269553979
Blank
Emotional Eating: What Your Closet ...
Jul 09 by Roger Gould, M.D.Blank
Top Women's Health Answerers
Avatar_f_tn
Blank
old_before_my_time
9090222_tn?1401649595
Blank
Madpi
973741_tn?1342346373
Blank
specialmom
1527510_tn?1392304944
Blank
Carly1306
United Kingdom
136956_tn?1363091289
Blank
ticked
Mississauga, ON
Avatar_f_tn
Blank
kitty094
London, United Kingdom