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Women’s Most Embarrassing Sex Questions Answered

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I’m pregnant. Is it okay to continue having sex with my partner? Will having sex hurt my unborn baby?

As long as your pregnancy is healthy and moving forward as scheduled, then absolutely, you can have sex as often as you’d like! Many couples worry that sex will hurt their unborn baby, but your precious little one is cushioned by amniotic fluid and well protected by the strong muscles of the uterus.

Intercourse during pregnancy can cause temporary uterine contractions, but these are harmless, and won’t last long. If your pain is persistent or accompanied by bleeding, see a doctor immediately.

And while intercourse is safe, you should take some precaution with oral sex while pregnant. Make sure your partner doesn’t blow into your genital area during oral sex. In rare cases, this can cause a life-threatening air embolism (an air bubble that enters your blood circulation).

 

Should I get tested for STIs?

If you’re sexually active, the question isn’t if you should get tested, but when.

If you are sexually active with more than one partner within a year, talk to your doctor — he or she can help you determine how often you should be tested, and which infections you should be screened for.

Testing is also highly recommended if you have symptoms of an STI, such as genital sores, discharge from the penis of vagina, or itching or burning during urination. But remember: Many infections do not show any symptoms, meaning you can contract or spread an infection without knowing it.

Getting tested regularly not only gives you peace of mind — it also ensures any problems will be caught and treated early so you and your partner can remain safe and healthy.

 

My partner and I don’t talk about sex, but I have needs and wants that are going unaddressed. How do I bring this up?

Are you scared about your partner’s reaction if you suggest something new? Perhaps feelings of embarrassment, vulnerability or fear of rejection are holding you back. Telling your partner about what arouses you can make your sex life more pleasurable, and can help you develop communication, trust and openness. Sharing sexual desires, fantasies or issues and showing your partner what excites you can play a significant role in a healthy and fulfilling sex life.

We might not always get what we want in life, but as a person in a committed relationship, you have the right to ask for what you want, says Neil Cannon, Ph.D, a certified sex therapist.

He recommends having an open and honest discussion about your feelings and your wants. If you’re feeling less connected during sex, talk to your partner and explain how you’re feeling. If you want to try something new, explain how that will help make sex more pleasurable — for both of you. Remember, your sex life is a work in progress, and it’s more than natural for both of your wants and needs to change over time.   

 

My boyfriend refuses to wear a condom because he says it dulls the sensation. Is this true?

Using a condom during sex is crucial for preventing STIs and unplanned pregnancy. Talk to your boyfriend; let him know that using a condom during sex will allow you to relax and have more fun because you won’t have to worry about these health risks. If you’re more relaxed, you can really focus on the experience — which will be more pleasurable for you both.

Sex with a condom can still be pleasurable. Condoms come in many different shapes, sizes, colors, textures and even flavors! Explore the different varieties with your man to see which kind feels the best for the both of you.


Are women supposed to climax every time we have sex? It’s so easy for my boyfriend! Why don’t I climax every time?

It’s actually very common for a woman to have trouble climaxing: 1 out of every 3 women has trouble reaching orgasm when having sex with a partner. For a small percentage of women, the problem may be medical, but most women can resolve their climax dilemma with a little trial-and-error with their partner (or themselves!). Not all women can climax from penetration alone — some need direct clitoral stimulation, and others need a bit of both! By learning what feels good and works best with your body, you can better direct your partner so you reach orgasm.

Remember: There is no right way to have sex. Don’t be afraid to tell you partner what feels good to you because there’s a good chance that it will make your partner’s experience better, too!

 

Published March 11, 2013.

 

Elizabeth Carey is a Denver, CO-based writer and editor. She fuses a passion for journalism with health, fitness and outdoor activity.


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