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Protein-Packed Smoothie Recipes

Feb 26, 2015 - 2 comments

          Protein-Packed Smoothie Recipes
Very Berry Super
12 oz water
1 cup spinach
2 cups frozen mixed berries
1/2 cup plain low-fat yogurt
2 scoops vanilla protein powder
1 tbsp walnuts
1 tbsp ground flaxseed
500 calories, 57 g protein, 54 g carbs, 14 g fiber, 11 g fat
Apple and Great Grains
12 oz water, milk, or yogurt
2 scoops vanilla flavored protein
1 apple, core removed, and sliced into wedges
1 cup of spinach
2 tbsp of almonds
¼ cup of uncooked oats
Ice as needed
Cinnamon to taste
535 calories, 58 g protein, 13 g fat, 46 g carbs, 9 g fiber (accounts for using water as the fluid instead of milk or yogurt)
Chocolate, Peanut Butter, and Banana
12 oz water, milk, or yogurt
2 scoops chocolate flavored protein powder
1 banana
1 cup of spinach
2 tbsp of natural peanut butter
1 tbsp cacao nibs or dark cocoa powder
585 calories, 59 g protein, 22 g fat, 38 g carbs, 8 g fiber (accounts for using water as the fluid instead of milk or yogurt)
Strawberry Banana
12 oz water, milk, or yogurt
2 scoops vanilla or strawberry flavored protein powder
1 banana
1 cup of frozen strawberries
1 cup of spinach
2 tbsp of ground flax
490 calories, 55 g protein, 9 g fat, 47 g carbs, 11 g fiber (accounts for using water as the fluid )

Chocolate Cherry
12 oz water, milk, or yogurt
2 scoops chocolate flavored protein powder
2 cups of sweet dark cherries, pits removed
1 cups of spinach
1 tbsp of walnuts
1 tbsp ground flax
1 tbsp cacao nibs or dark cocoa powder
530 calories, 56 g protein, 13 g fat, 47 g carbs, 9 g fiber (accounts for using water as the fluid instead of milk or yogurt)
Vanilla Pumpkin Pie
12 oz water, milk, or yogurt
2 scoops vanilla flavored protein powder
¾ cup of pureed pumpkin
1 tbsp of walnuts
1 tbsp of ground flax
½ cup of uncooked oats
Cinnamon and vanilla extract to taste
Ice as needed
535 calories, 60 g protein, 13 g fat, 45 g carbs, 13 g fiber (accounts for using water as the fluid instead of milk or yogurt)
Baked Apple
12 oz water, milk, or yogurt
2 scoops vanilla flavored protein powder
1 apple, core removed, and sliced into wedges
1 cup of spinach
1 tbsp of almonds
1 tbsp of ground flax
1 tbsp of sesame seeds
Cinnamon to taste
Ice as needed
510 calories, 57 g protein, 15 g fat, 36 g carbs, 10 g fiber (accounts for using water as the fluid instead of milk or yogurt)


Tropical Power
12 oz water, milk, or yogurt
2 scoops vanilla flavored protein powder
½ banana
1 cup of pineapple
1 cup of spinach
1 tbsp of ground flax
2 tbsp of unsweetened coconut flakes
½ cup plain yogurt or vegan alternative
525 calories, 58 grams protein, 12 g fat, 46 g carbs, 8.5 g fiber (accounts for using water as the fluid instead of milk or yogurt)
Superfood Shake
1/2 cup frozen cherries
8 oz water
1/2 cup chopped raw beets
1/2 cup frozen strawberries
1/2 cup frozen blueberries
1/2 banana
1 scoop chocolate whey protein
1 tbsp ground flaxseed
329 calories, 28 g protein, 4 g fat, 52 g carbs, 11 g fiber

Power Shake
¼ cup low fat cottage cheese
1 cup blueberries (fresh or frozen)
1 scoop vanilla protein powder
2 tbsp flaxseed meal
2 tbsp walnuts, chopped
1½ cups water
3 ice cubes
389 calories, 33 g protein, 17 g fat, 34 g carbs



Chocolate Mint Smoothie
1 scoop chocolate protein powder
3/4 cup Silk Almond milk, dark chocolate
1 tbsp walnuts
2 tbsp cocoa powder, unsweetened
1 tbsp cacao nibs
2 mint leaves
4 ice cubes
¼ cup water
292 calories, 25 g protein, 12 g fat, 32 g carbs
Coconut Almond Smoothie
1 scoop chocolate protein powder
1 tbsp unsweetened coconut flakes
1 cup Silk Almond milk, dark chocolate
1 rounded tbsp almond butter
1½ cups water
3 ice cubes
405 calories, 27 g protein, 21 g fat, 33 g carbs

Orange Creamsicle
1 scoop vanilla protein powder
1 orange
¼ orange peel
1 tbsp walnuts
2 tbsp flaxseed meal
1 cup water
½ cup orange juice
3 ice cubes
399 calories, 32 g protein, 14 g fat, 39 g carbs
Strawberry Banana Post-Workout Smoothie
Water as needed
1 cup plain low-fat kefir
2 tbsp walnuts
1 cup chopped strawberries
1 banana
1 scoop vanilla whey protein
489 calories, 39 g protein, 11 g fat, 59 g carbs, 7 g fiber



Chocolate Peanut Butter Smoothie
Water as needed
2 tbsp flaxmeal
1 tbsp unsweetened cocoa powder
1 tbsp natural peanut butter
1 scoop chocolate whey protein powder
347 calories, 33 g protein, 17 g fat, 19 g carbs, 9 g fiber

Mocha Breakfast Shake
12 oz cold black coffee
1 frozen banana
2 scoops chocolate whey protein powder
1 tbsp unsweetened cocoa
Handful of walnuts
1 cup of ice
Blueberry Breakfast Smoothie
1 cup blueberries
1/2 banana
1 1/2 scoops protein powder
2 tbsp walnuts
2 tbsp oats
1 tbsp chia seeds
536 calories, 42 g protein, 59 g carbs, 12 g fiber, 18 g fat
Mango Tango Shake
2 scoops vanilla whey protein powder
1 cup frozen chopped mango
1 oz of walnuts
12 oz orange juice
Ice as needed
Green Monster
8 to 10 oz water
2 stalks kale, stems optional
1 cup grapes
1/2 cup frozen mango chunks
1 strip lemon rind
1/2 avocado
Ice as needed
346 calories, 9 g protein, 12 g fat, 62 g carbohydrates, 11 g fiber

Summertime Blast
2/3 cup seedless watermelon
2 tsp lemon juice
1/2 cantaloupe
1 banana
1/4 cup pineapple
2/3 cup ice
4 to 5 fresh basil leaves
182 calories, 3 g protein, 1 g fat, 47 g carbohydrates, 5 g fiber


Closing in on a cure for Crohn's

Feb 26, 2015 - 0 comments

More than 750,000 Americans suffer from Crohn's disease, a painful, chronic inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract that causes abdominal cramps and diarrhea.

Prescription medications may give some patients relief, but so far there is no cure.

Now, however, researchers say they have identified the bacteria that causes inflammation in some patients, helping them close in on a cure.

Eric Prado, 20, was a college freshman when he developed what he thought was a stomach bug.

"It feels like a stabbing pain, kind of all around," says Prado.

Doctors diagnosed Prado with Crohn's disease, a serious inflammation of the small bowel and colon.

Saleh Naser is a microbiologist from the University of Central Florida College of Medicine who specializes in Crohn's research. Naser says patients with severe cases can be virtually housebound.

"They have a chair next to the bathroom door where they have to go to the bathroom 15 to 20 times a day,” says Naser.

Naser has identified bacteria called MAP that could hold the key.

"This bacteria is known for a long time now to be responsible for the same symptoms we see in Crohn's disease, but in cows," says Naser.

As part of a clinical trial, Naser's lab is testing blood and tissue samples from Crohn's patients for the presence of MAP.

Patients are being given what Naser calls anti-MAP therapy; for one year, they take three antibiotics known to kill the MAP bacteria in the lab.

"If the bacteria is gone, then the symptoms should be gone," says Naser.

Prado is thankful his symptoms are mild and mostly controlled with medication.

“You don't know the future, sometimes you just have to be positive and keep doing what you do," says Prado.

65 clinical sites in three countries are participating in the MAP trial of the antibiotic therapy.

Naser says it's his goal to learn more about the bacteria and why some people are more at risk for Crohn's than others.

BACKGROUND: Crohn's disease is part of a group of conditions known as Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD). It can affect the entire thickness of the bowel wall and can "skip" areas, meaning there can be normal areas in-between patches of intestine. Since Crohn's is a chronic condition, the disease will have symptoms that flare up followed by periods of remission. Symptoms may include: fatigue, fever, diarrhea, abdominal pain/cramping, blood in stool, loss of appetite followed by weight loss, mouth sores and perianal disease (pain or drainage near the anus).

(Sources: http://www.ccfa.org/what-are-crohns-and-colitis/what-is-crohns-disease/, http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/crohns-disease/basics/symptoms/con-20032061)

DIAGNOSIS/TREATMENT: There is no singular test that can diagnose Crohn's; however it is a combination of information that doctors will use to determine the cause of symptoms. Physical examination, blood work, stool samples, and X-rays of G.I. tract are early tests and exams that can help determine diagnosis. An endoscopy can examine the colon and a biopsy can examine the tissue of the colon or affected area. The goal of treating Crohn's is to reduce the inflammation that causes symptoms. Anti-inflammatory drugs, immune system suppressors, and antibiotics are standards-of-care; as well as anti-diarrheals, pain relievers, iron and calcium supplements, and vitamin B-12 shots. Nutrition therapy, involving a low-fiber diet, may also be used to compliment medications; this will reduce the size and number of bowel movements. Surgery is also an option; however the effect is usually temporary because the disease can occur near the reconnected tissue.

(Sources: http://www.ccfa.org/what-are-crohns-and-colitis/what-is-crohns-disease/crohns-diagnosis-testing.html, http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/crohns-disease/basics/treatment/con-20032061)

NEW DISCOVERY: Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis, or MAP, has been known for a long time to be responsible for the symptoms of Crohn's disease, but in cows, sheep and goats. Not all human cases of Crohn's are caused by MAP. Now, a simple blood test can identify the DNA of the MAP, allowing doctors to quickly diagnose or rule out Crohn's. A clinical trial is now underway, testing anti-MAP therapy which consists of three antibiotics known to kill the MAP bacteria. Saleh Naser, Ph.D., Microbiologist and Professor of Infectious Disease at University of Central Florida told Ivanhoe, "These antibiotics do kill the underlying cause of Crohn's which is MAP. If MAP is eradicated, the patient should be without any symptoms." Dr. Naser's team, as well as teams in several other countries, are conducting ongoing trials and hope to publish their findings within the next couple of years. For information on the clinical trial and recruitment locations, click here.
(Source: Interview with Dr. Naser)
FOR MORE INFORMATION ON THIS REPORT, PLEASE CONTACT:

Wendy Sarubbi
Public Relations, UCF
(407) 266-1418                                  
Wendy.  sarubbi  @  ucf. edu

EWG's 2015 Shopper's Guide to Pesticides in Produce

Feb 26, 2015 - 0 comments

http://www.ewg.org/foodnews/summary.php

Study links common food additives to Crohn's disease, colitis

Feb 25, 2015 - 0 comments

Common additives in ice cream, margarine, packaged bread and many processed foods may promote the inflammatory bowel diseases ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease as well as a group of obesity-related conditions, scientists said on Wednesday.

The researchers focused on emulsifiers, chemicals added to many food products to improve texture and extend shelf life. In mouse experiments, they found emulsifiers can change the species composition of gut bacteria and induce intestinal inflammation.

Such inflammation is associated with the frequently debilitating Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis as well as metabolic syndrome, a group of conditions that increase risk for type-2 diabetes, heart disease and stroke.

Mice were fed emulsifiers diluted in drinking water or added into food, which were found to trigger low-grade intestinal inflammation and features of metabolic syndrome such as blood glucose level abnormalities, increased body weight and abdominal fat weight.

Consuming emulsifiers increased the risk of colitis, mimicking human inflammatory bowel disease, in mice genetically susceptible to the condition, the study found.

Georgia State University microbiologist Benoit Chassaing, whose study appears in the journal Nature, said the effects seen in mice "may be observed in humans as well."

The study involved two widely used emulsifiers, polysorbate 80 and carboxymethylcellulose. The researchers are planning human studies and are already studying other emulsifiers.

Emulsifiers are used in margarine, mayonnaise, creamy sauces, candy, ice cream, packaged processed foods and baked goods. They can make products like mayonnaise smooth and creamy instead of an unappetizing amalgam of water and oily globules.

A key feature of inflammatory bowel diseases and metabolic syndrome is a change in the gut microbiota - the roughly 100 trillion bacteria that inhabit the intestinal tract - in ways that promote inflammation. In mice given emulsifiers, the bacteria were more apt to digest and infiltrate the dense mucus layer that lines and protects the intestines.

Incidence of inflammatory bowel disease and metabolic syndrome started rising in the mid-20th century at roughly the same time that food manufacturers began widespread emulsifier use, the researchers said.

"We were thinking there was some non-genetic factor out there, some environmental factor, that would be explaining the increase in these chronic inflammatory diseases," Georgia State immunologist Andrew Gewirtz said.

"And we thought that emulsifiers were a good candidate because they are so ubiquitous and their use has roughly paralleled the increase in these diseases. But I guess we were surprised at how strong the effects were."