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FDA Approves Unique Stem Cell Therapy Trial in MS Patients

Mar 17, 2016 - 0 comments


FDA Approves Unique Stem Cell Therapy Trial in MS Patients
https://multiplesclerosis.net/news/fda-approves-unique-stem-cell-therapy-trial-in-ms-patients/

Calcium boosts risk of heart attack, stroke for women, study finds

Mar 17, 2016 - 6 comments

Calcium boosts risk of heart attack, stroke for women, study finds

https://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/the-checkup/post/calcium-boosts-risk-of-heart-attack-stroke-for-women-study-finds/2011/04/19/AFKcJK5D_blog.html

Harvard researchers and the Atkins Diet

Mar 16, 2016 - 7 comments

Harvard researchers put pre-obese people (they had just lost 10-15 percent of their body weight) on three different diets—a low-fat, high-carb diet; a low-glycemic diet with fewer carbs; and a high-protein, high-fat, Atkins-style diet. Each participant ate the same number of calories on each diet, yet at the end of the study, they found that people burned the most calories at rest while on the Atkins diet. The low-fat, high-carb diet produced the worst effects, triggering changes "that would predict weight gain," noted the authors.
The finding that diet quality can trump quantity is great news until you consider that many calorie-cutters fail to get the recommended daily intake for protein (46 g a day for women; 56 for men)—recommendation that some experts say is already too low. "It appears that there is a 30 gram protein threshold per meal," says metabolism research Donald Layman, PhD, professor emeritus at the University of Illinois. That means if you eat less, your body won't get enough amino acids to build muscle. It also may not be enough to control hunger. "Eating higher protein and fewer carbohydrates will improve body composition, satiety, calorie burning, and insulin control," says Layman.


Grounding

Mar 16, 2016 - 1 comments

More than 90 percent of physician visits are for stress- and inflammatory-related issues. Stress and inflammation go hand in hand and are a huge undercurrent in the vast majority of diseases. Researchers at Emory University School of Medicine in Atlanta have also found that poor sleep quality is intimately related to inflammation. It may sound a little strange, but touching the earth may be the biggest key to eliminating our issues with chronic inflammation.
Reduction in inflammation as a result of earthing has been documented with infrared medical imaging and with measurements of blood chemistry and white blood cell counts. The logical explanation for the anti-inflammatory effects is that grounding the body allows negatively charged antioxidant electrons from the earth to enter the body and neutralize positively charged free radicals at sites of inflammation. Flow of electrons from the earth to the body has been documented.
A study published in 2004 looked at the biological effects of grounding the human body during sleep as measured by cortisol levels and subjective reporting of sleep, pain, and stress. The study found that the patients who were grounded during sleep had reduced nighttime levels of cortisol and an overall normalization of cortisol secretion during the day. Cortisol effects your sleep. If your cortisol levels are off, your sleep will be off. Subjective reporting by the study participants also indicated that grounding during sleep improved sleep quality, reduced pain, and lowered stress.
Getting yourself grounded can have a life-changing impact on your sleep quality. Today you can utilize incredible earthing technology that brings the benefits of the earth's energy into your home.
The above sleep study utilized grounding products to connect the test subjects with the earth.
Source: S. Stevenson