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The REAL Paleo Diet Source: Lou Schuler and John Williams, Ph.D

Mar 31, 2014 - 0 comments

The paleo diet
gets a lot of things right. First and foremost, it’s a simple and effective system for reducing your daily calories without starving or depriving yourself of important nutrients. The recommended foods include most of the best protein sources—meat, fish, poultry, eggs—along with plenty of fruit, vegetables, nuts, and seeds. It’s hard to go wrong with a diet in which 100 percent of the foods are unprocessed, with no added sugar or salt.  

But no one should ever claim with a straight face that it represents what people actually ate in the Paleolithic, an era that started roughly 2.5 million years ago and lasted until the rise of agriculture about 10,000 years ago. Or what more recent hunter-gatherer tribes ate, and in some cases still eat, according to historians and anthropologists.

Some of their culinary choices seem like they’re straight out of your worst nightmare, if your nightmares resemble zombie movies, giving you a whole new appreciation for our modern food industry. Bring on the candy corn!

1. Rumen noodles
“Chyme” is a sweet word for a food source that’s objectively sour: the semi-digested stomach contents of animals. It’s not just a meal ready to eat. It’s already eaten.

Why stomach stew? Imagine you’re a caveman living in an ice age. You have zero access to plant food for months at a time. Along comes an unsuspecting herbivore, looking for moss and lichen and whatever else it can scrape off rocks or bark. After you kill it, those stomach contents give you the first hot meal of the day—no microwave required—and provide nutrients you wouldn’t otherwise get, including active live cultures to aid digestion.

Nearly every pre-modern society had a thing for it, and not just for food. The Kuria in East Africa would rub the chyme of cattle, goats, and sheep all over their bodies, using it as a magical perfume to protect them from bad people. (Maybe it’s just us, but we can’t imagine it would take a lot of magic to persuade bad guys to stay away from someone slathered in goat guts in the boiling African heat.)

Closer to home, Inuits of the 19th and 20th centuries were observed eating partly fermented, pre-digested mush from the rumen of reindeer. Deer, like cattle and sheep, are called ruminants because they digest food through a circular process of chewing, digesting (in a part of the stomach called the rumen), regurgitating, chewing again, and repeating.

If you’ve ever wondered where the word “ruminate” comes from, now you know. Good luck trying to forget.

2. The original Gatorade
Many a young man has taken a sip of a flat, warm beer and said to himself, “Ugh! That tastes like buffalo ****!” And of course nobody would ever drink such a thing on purpose, right?

Some did.

The Comanche were the most deadly and feared fighting force of the early 19th century on America’s Great Plains. On a long hunt in hot, dry weather, they would sometimes ride for a day or two between water sources. The risk of dehydration, and loss of electrolytes, would’ve been considerable.

The solution, according to Empire of the Summer Moon, a history of the Comanche, was found inside the bison they hunted. As soon as the magnificent mammal bit the prairie, they scrambled for its juicy innards. “Children would … squirt the salty bile from the gallbladder onto the liver and eat it on the spot, warm and dripping blood,” author Sam Gwynne writes.

All fluids were appreciated, including “warm curdled milk from the stomach of a suckling calf.” That warm beer doesn’t look so bad now, does it?

3. Man ham
All in all, the Comanche were so good at what they did that they were typically healthy and robust. But that’s not why a rival tribe, the Tonkawa, were known to eat the Comanche warriors they killed in combat. They were after more than lean protein.

Today we think of cannibalism in terms of the Donner party—something desperate people do during desperate times. But archaeologists and historians have found lots of evidence of cannibalism throughout human history, including the remains of 11 juveniles who were butchered and eaten 800,000 years ago at a cave in Spain. Our close cousins, the Neanderthals, were also known to have feasted on their own.

The open question is why. Did they enjoy the taste of hominid flesh? Was there a nutritional advantage to Soylent Green over, say, chyme? Were they simply desperate? Or was there a ritualistic or magical element that had little to do with appetite?

For the Tonkawa, it was the latter. The goal was to absorb the mojo of their badass enemies. That’s according to an eyewitness report of dead-guy goulash from Noah Smithwick, one of the rare palefaces to live and travel with Indian tribes in the 1800s: “Having fleeced off the flesh of the dead Comanche, they borrowed a big wash kettle … into which they put the Comanche meat, together with a lot of corn and potatoes – the most revolting mess my eyes ever rested on.”




They found a solution to lower Medicare costs, killing seniors.

Mar 30, 2014 - 0 comments

New Blood Pressure Guidelines May Take Millions of Americans Off Meds

About 5.8 million American adults may no longer be prescribed drugs to treat high blood pressure under recently revised guidelines, according to a new study.

In February, the Eighth Joint National Committee released controversial guidelines that relaxed blood pressure goals in adults 60 and older from 140/90 to 150/90. The guidelines also eased blood pressure targets for adults with diabetes and kidney disease.

In this study, researchers used blood pressure data collected from more than 16,000 Americans between 2005 and 2010 to assess the impact of the revised guidelines.

The proportion of adults considered eligible for medication to treat high blood pressure would fall from about 41 percent to 32 percent, the authors concluded in the study published online March 29 in the Journal of the American Medical Association and presented Saturday at the American College of Cardiology annual meeting in Washington, D.C.

The researchers also said that 13.5 million adults -- most of them older than 60 -- who were considered to have poorly controlled blood pressure would now be viewed as having adequately managed blood pressure. That includes 5.8 million adults who would no longer require blood pressure pills.

"The new guidelines do not address whether these adults should still be considered as having hypertension. But they would no longer need medication to lower their blood pressure," study lead author Ann Marie Navar-Boggan, a cardiology fellow at Duke University School of Medicine, said in a Duke news release.

One in four adults older than 60 currently receives treatment for high blood pressure, according to the researchers.

"These adults would be eligible for less intensive blood pressure medication under the new guidelines, particularly if they were experiencing side effects," Navar-Boggan said. "But many experts fear that increasing blood pressure levels in these adults could be harmful."

Even under the new guidelines, about 28 million U.S. adults still have uncontrolled high blood pressure and more than half of them don't receive treatment, said Navar-Boggan, who noted that uncontrolled high blood pressure is a risk factor for heart attack and stroke.

More information

The U.S. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute has more about high blood pressure.

SOURCE: Duke Medicine, news release, March 29, 2014



Fish Oil Study

Mar 23, 2014 - 0 comments

A study of 4,203 people between the ages of 50 and 85 years found that those given a daily fish oil supplement (650 mg EPA  and 350 mg DHA) for about 5 years had no significant reduction in cardiovascular disease compared to those taking placebo. All of the participants were also taking a daily vitamin/mineral supplement as part of a study of macular degeneration (AREDS2 Study, JAMA 2014).

Smoothies and Protein Bars

Mar 21, 2014 - 0 comments

  Breakfast and Post-Workout Smoothies

Apple Cinnamon Smoothie
Vanilla
Whey protein
1 unsweetened vanilla almond milk

1 Granny Smith apple (cored, sliced)

½ frozen banana

1 tsp cinnamon

stevia (to taste)

5 ice cubes

Apricot Vanilla Smoothie
Vanilla
Whey protein
1 cup unsweetened vanilla almond milk

½ cup fat-free yogurt

10 dried apricot halves

1 tbsp honey

5 ice cubes

Banana Bread Smoothie
Vanilla
Whey protein
1 cup unsweetened vanilla almond milk

1 frozen banana

½ cup (dry measure) rolled oats

1 tsp cinnamon

5 ice cubes

Banana Nutella Smoothie
Vanilla
Whey protein
1 cup unsweetened almond milk

½ cup fat-free yogurt

1 tbsp Nutella

1 frozen banana

½ tsp pure vanilla extract

stevia (to taste)

5 ice cubes

Banana Split Smoothie
Vanilla
Whey protein
1 cup unsweetened vanilla almond milk

1 frozen banana

½ cup frozen pineapple chunks

5 frozen strawberries

1 tsp pure cocoa powder

5 ice cubes

Blue Bomber Smoothie
Vanilla
Whey protein
½ cup fat-free plain yogurt

1 cup water

2 cups frozen blueberries

stevia (to taste)

5 ice cubes

Blueberry Bliss Smoothie
Vanilla
Whey protein
1 cup unsweetened almond milk

1 cup frozen blueberries

½ frozen banana

2 tbsp flaxseed meal

stevia (to taste)

5 ice cubes

Carrot Cake Protein Smoothie
Vanilla
Whey protein
1 cup unsweetened vanilla almond milk

1 frozen banana

½ cup baby carrots

2 tbsp flaxseed meal

½ tsp vanilla extract

½ tsp each of cinnamon and nutmeg

stevia (to taste)

5 ice cubes

Chocolate Cherry Smoothie
Vanilla
Whey protein
1 cup unsweetened chocolate almond milk

½ cup fat-free yogurt

1 cup frozen cherries

1 tbsp honey

5 ice cubes

Creamy Peach Smoothie
Vanilla Whey protein
½ cup fat-free plain yogurt

1 cup water

1 peach (pitted and sliced)

2 tbsp honey

5 ice cubes


Honey Raspberry Smoothie

Vanilla Whey protein
½ cup fat-free plain yogurt

1 cup water

1 cup frozen raspberries

1 frozen banana

1 tbsp honey

5 ice cubes

Mixed Berry Smoothie

Vanilla Whey protein
1 cup unsweetened almond milk

½ cup fat-free yogurt

½ cup frozen strawberries

½ cup frozen blueberries

½ cup frozen raspberries

1 tbsp honey

5 ice cubes

Oats and Honey Smoothie

Vanilla Whey protein
1 cup unsweetened vanilla almond milk

½ cup (dry measure) rolled oats

1 tbsp honey

stevia (to taste)

5 ice cubes

Piña Colada Smoothie

Vanilla Whey protein
1cup unsweetened vanilla almond milk

½ cup frozen pineapple chunks

3 tbsp unsweetened shredded coconut

stevia (to taste)

5 ice cubes

Strawberry Banana Smoothie

Vanilla Whey protein
1 cup unsweetened vanilla almond milk

1 frozen banana

1 cup frozen strawberries

stevia (to taste)

5 ice cubes

T’s Special Smoothie

Vanilla Whey protein
1 cup unsweetened vanilla almond milk

½ cup fat-free plain yogurt

1 frozen banana

½ cup blueberries

1 tbsp honey roasted peanut butter (freshly ground)

½ tsp cinnamon

5 ice cubes

Tropical Smoothie

Vanilla Whey protein
1 cup unsweetened coconut milk

½ cup honeydew melon

½ frozen banana

½ cup mango

3 tbsp unsweetened shredded coconut

stevia (to taste)

5 ice cubes


                                                           Anytime
Smoothies

Banana Coconut Smoothie

Vanilla Whey protein
1 cup unsweetened coconut milk

3 tbsp unsweetened shredded coconut

½ frozen banana

1 tsp coconut extract

5 ice cubes

Berries and Cream Smoothie

Vanilla Whey protein
1 cup unsweetened almond milk

½ cup low-fat cottage cheese

½ cup frozen strawberries

½ cup frozen blueberries

2 tbsp flaxseed meal

5 ice cubes

Chocolate Covered Strawberry Smoothie

Whey Chocolate protein
1 cup unsweetened chocolate almond milk

1 cup frozen strawberries

2 tbsp flaxseed meal

stevia (to taste)

5 ice cubes

Chocolate Lover’s Smoothie

Whey Chocolate protein
1 cup unsweetened chocolate almond milk

1 tbsp pure cocoa powder
(I suggest Navitas Brand Cacao Powder )
1 tbsp natural peanut butter

½ frozen banana

½ tbsp extra virgin coconut oil

stevia (to taste)

5 ice cubes

Chocolate Orange Smoothie

Whey Chocolate protein
1 cup unsweetened chocolate almond milk

½ cup low-fat cottage cheese

1 orange (peeled and all skin removed)

2 tbsp flaxseed meal

stevia (to taste)

5 ice cubes

Cinnamon Roll
Supreme Smoothie

Vanilla Whey protein
1 cup unsweetened vanilla almond milk

1 tsp cinnamon

½ tsp vanilla extract

1 tsp Butter Buds or butter extract

stevia (to taste)

5 ice cubes

Green Superfood Smoothie

Vanilla Whey protein
1 cup water

1 cup kale leaves (ribs and stems removed)

½ frozen banana

3 tbsp unsweetened coconut flakes

stevia (to taste)

5 ice cubes

Green Tea Protein Smoothie

Vanilla Whey protein
1 cup unsweetened vanilla almond milk

1 frozen banana

1 tsp matcha green tea powder

stevia (to taste)

5 ice cubes

Peanut Butterscotch Smoothie

Vanilla Whey protein
1 cup unsweetened vanilla almond milk

½ cup fat-free plain yogurt

1 tbsp natural peanut butter

stevia (to taste)

5 ice cubes

Peanut Butter and
Banana Delight Smoothie

Vanilla Whey protein
1 cup unsweetened almond milk

½ cup low-fat cottage cheese

½ frozen banana

1 heaping tbsp peanut butter

stevia (to taste)

5 ice cubes

Peanut Butter Cup Smoothie

Whey Chocolate protein
1 cup unsweetened chocolate almond milk

½ frozen banana

2 tbsp natural peanut butter

1 tbsp pure cocoa powder

stevia (to taste)

5 ice cubes

Popeye’s Super Spinach Smoothie

Vanilla Whey protein
1 cup unsweetened almond milk

3 cups spinach

½ frozen banana

1 tbsp natural peanut butter

stevia (to taste)

5 ice cubes

Strawberry Cheesecake Smoothie

Vanilla Whey protein
1 cup unsweetened vanilla almond milk

½ cup nonfat Greek yogurt

1 cup frozen strawberries

½ tsp cinnamon

stevia (to taste)

5 ice cubes

Strawberry Shortcake Smoothie

Vanilla Whey protein
1 cup unsweetened vanilla almond milk

10 frozen strawberries

½ tsp almond extract

stevia (to taste)

5 ice cubes

Veggie Lover’s Smoothie

Vanilla Whey protein
1 cup unsweetened almond milk

½ cup nonfat Greek yogurt

1 cup spinach

1 tomato (small)

¼ cup each: baby carrots, onion, avocado, cucumber

½ tbsp coconut oil

½ oz cashews

5 ice cubes

Café Mocha Smoothie

Whey Chocolate protein
1 cup cold water

1 tbsp instant coffee

2 tbsp flaxseed meal

stevia (to taste)

5 ice cubes

Cake Batter Smoothie

Vanilla Whey protein
1 cup unsweetened vanilla almond milk

½ cup low-fat cottage cheese

½ tsp pure vanilla extract

5 ice cubes

Chocolate Coconut Smoothie

Whey Chocolate protein
1 cup unsweetened chocolate almond milk

1 tbsp natural almond butter

3 tbsp unsweetened shredded coconut

stevia (to taste)

5 ice cubes

Chocolate Covered
Almond Joy Smoothie

Whey Chocolate protein
1 cup unsweetened coconut milk

1 tbsp shredded coconut

½ oz almonds

½ tsp almond extract

1 tbsp pure cocoa powder
( I suggest Navitas Brand Cacao Powder )
stevia (to taste)

5 ice cubes

Chocolate Turtle Smoothie

Whey Chocolate protein
1 cup unsweetened chocolate almond milk

1/3 cup egg whites (pasteurized)

2 tbsp flaxseed meal

1 tbsp almond butter (or ¼ cup chopped pecans)

stevia (to taste)

5 ice cubes

Choco Mint Smoothie

Whey Chocolate protein
1 cup unsweetened chocolate almond milk

1 tsp pure cocoa powder
( I suggest Navitas Brand Cacao Powder )
2 tsp mint extract

stevia (to taste)

5 ice cubes

                                                    Best smoothie ingredients

Chia Seeds, Chia is a source of protein and trace minerals. It contains more than three times of essential fatty acids of most grains. Buy organic, since certain pesticides can build up in a plant's seeds.
Goji berries, Rich sources of antioxidants and 18 amino acids.
Kale, contains isothiocyanate and glucosinolate compounds that help lower your risk of cancer.
Camu-Camu, Contains vitamin C, up to 60 times more than an orange. It's also rich in potassium, calcium, protein, and other phytochemicals. Cacao Powder,  Rich sources of antioxidants, magnesium, iron and potassium.
Maca, It's rich in mood boosting B vitamins, amino acids, and brain-boosting fatty acids.
Wheatgrass, loaded with vitamins, minerals, amino acids, fiber, antioxidants, and a bit of beneficial fatty acids.
Coconut oil, contains lots of lauric acid, a potent immune system protector.
Avocados, rich in vitamin E that could help protect your brain from Alzheimer's disease. It also contains plant-based proteins.
Whey protein, It contains the amino acid cysteine that helps convert glutathione in the body. Glutathione is a potent antioxidant that prepares cells to fight against bacterial or viral infections.
Hemp, It contains all of the amino acids to form complete protein.

                                               Protein Bars

Strawberry Protein Bars With Raisins

This delicious “no-bake” recipe combines strawberry whey protein powder,

raisins, oats, and peanut butter to make a healthy and high protein bar.

Ingredients

• 4 scoops Strawberry Flavored Whey Protein Powder

• ¾ cup Raisins

• ½ cup Peanut Butter

• ¾ cup Whole Milk

• 3 cups Oats

Cooking Instructions

Combine all ingredients in a bowl and mix well. Spread

in a 9x9 baking pan lined with parchment paper. Place in

refrigerator and allow to set overnight. Cut into 6 equal

squares.

You may also use chocolate whey protein powder instead of strawberry.

Serving Suggestions

Makes 6 protein bars.

Nutritional Info

Calories: 431

Protein: 31 grams

Carbs: 50 grams

Fat: 14.5 grams

Multigrain Nutrition Granola Bars


What you’ll need:

2 cups rolled oats

¼ cup sesame seeds

2 Tbsp almonds, chopped

1 Tbsp cashews, chopped

1 Tbsp ground flaxseed, optional

½ cup water

½ cup multi-grain cereal, like this one from Bob's Red Mill

¾ cup creamy peanut butter

½ cup honey

1 cup mixed dried fruit (raisins, cranberries, cherries, apricots), roughly chopped

Pinch kosher salt

How to make it:

1. Preheat the oven to 350°F. Combine oats, seeds, nuts, and flaxseed, spread onto a sheet pan, and

bake until light brown, about 10 to 12 minutes. Pour the warm mixture into a large bowl.

2. Boil water in a medium saucepan and remove it from heat. Add the multi-grain cereal and allow it to

absorb the water, about 2 minutes. Stir in peanut butter and honey, and set the mixture over mediumlow

heat. Stir constantly until the mixture thickens and pulls away from the sides, about 2 minutes.

3. Mix the fruit and salt into the peanut-butter mixture, then immediately pour into the bowl with the

grains. Using a rubber spatula, stir until the grains are evenly coated.

4. Grease an 8x8-inch baking pan with cooking spray, transfer the mixture to the pan, and press it into

a uniform ½-inch thickness. Move the pan to the refrigerator and allow it to chill for at least two hours.

5. Cut into 1½-inch by 1¼-inch bars. Serve immediately or wrap individually in plastic wrap. Bars will

keep for two days at room temperature or four days refrigerated. Makes 30 bars