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The modern version of wheat is a far cry from the ancient plant

Oct 27, 2016 - 7 comments

The modern version of wheat is a far cry from the ancient plant. In fact, the newer, high-yield wheat we've been eating since the 1980s is full of genetic changes that seem to inflame our bodies, cause our guts to leak, and trigger autoimmune diseases. Some of the strange health problems associated with wheat.

Regardless of whether you suffer from celiac disease an ailment triggered by wheat's gluten or not, many experts now believe anyone giving up not just gluten, but wheat altogether, could enjoy tremendous weight loss and health benefits. "It means making soups, salad dressings, and dinners yourself, the most assured way to avoid problem ingredients," says Dr. Davis. "Wheat Belly also discourages people from resorting to the unhealthy gluten-free replacement foods."

Whole wheat is full of sugar, whether in bread or pasta form or hiding out as an ingredient in canned soup or frozen dinners, could be sending you on a path toward type 2 diabetes. Get this: Eating two slices of whole wheat bread could spike your blood sugar levels more than if you'd eat two tablespoons of pure sugar!

Is wheat bad for you? Here's the quick backstory: The modern version of wheat is a far cry from the ancient plant. In fact, the newer, high-yield wheat we've been eating since the 1980s is full of genetic changes that seem to inflame our bodies, cause our guts to leak, and trigger autoimmune diseases. To figure out some of the strange health problems associated with wheat, we flipped through the New York Times best-selling book Wheat Belly, and spoke with its author, cardiologist William Davis, MD.

But is a wheat-free diet really for you? Regardless of whether you suffer from celiac disease an ailment triggered by wheat's gluten or not, many experts now believe anyone giving up not just gluten, but wheat altogether, could enjoy tremendous weight loss and health benefits. "It means making soups, salad dressings, and dinners yourself, the most assured way to avoid problem ingredients," says Dr. Davis. "Wheat Belly also discourages people from resorting to the unhealthy gluten-free replacement foods."

You've been brainwashed into thinking you need whole wheat as part of a healthy diet. The truth is, whole wheat is full of sugar, whether in bread or pasta form or hiding out as an ingredient in canned soup or frozen dinners, could be sending you on a path toward type 2 diabetes. Get this: Eating two slices of whole wheat bread could spike your blood sugar levels more than if you'd eat two tablespoons of pure sugar!

"Aside from some extra fiber, eating two slices of whole wheat bread is really little different, and often worse, than drinking a can of sugar-sweetened soda or eating a sugary candy bar," Dr. Davis writes in Wheat Belly. (Try Dr. Davis' Wheat Belly 10-Day Grain Detox to makeover your health and body in just 10 days no exercise, no calorie counting, no hunger.)

The chronic spikes in blood sugar and insulin spur the growth of dangerous visceral fat, an accumulation that leads to fat encasing your liver, kidneys, pancreas, small intestines, and, on the outside, your belly. This unique abdominal fat manufactures excess estrogen in both men and women, proving that gluten leads to fat. That increases the risk of breast cancer in women and could lead to dreaded "man boobs" in men. Use it as a signal that you need to cut wheat. "I'd go as far as saying that overly enthusiastic wheat consumption is the main cause of the obesity and diabetes crisis in the United States," Dr. Davis writes in Wheat Belly.

Skin is your largest organ and a major part of your immune system. Unfortunately, it is not immune to wheat's wicked health effects. According to Dr. Davis, wheat ages your skin, including wrinkles and lost elasticity, due to the formation of advanced glycation end products, nasty muck that accumulates and ages us as it elevates our blood sugar. Wheat's been shown to advance aging and cause wrinkles, but it's also linked to other skin problems, including herpes-like skin inflammation, oral ulcers, psoriasis, and erythema nodosum, shiny red, hot, painful lesions that usually appear on the shins.

Ironically, the government pushes whole wheat as a healthy way to keep your heart in good shape. Dr. Davis says that no matter what type of wheat, be it organic, stone-ground, sprouted grain, or home-baked, it's still wheat, a combination of compounds that trigger high blood sugar, visceral fat, unhealthy cholesterol particles in the blood, and inflammation all bad news for your heart.

There are many different causes of baldness, some of them hereditary, some of them side effects of medical treatments like chemotherapy. But one type, alopecia areata, could pertain to eating wheat, Dr. Davis says. Referring to hair loss that occurs in patches, usually from the scalp but sometimes in other parts of the body, too, alopecia areata is fueled by eating wheat and the celiac-like inflammation that flares up in the skin as a result, according to Wheat Belly. On the other hand, give up wheat to make hair grow. Dr. Davis has seen hair growth return in many of his bald patients after they give up wheat no hair plugs, creams, or surgery required.

You've probably heard of "hormone disruptors," but how about pH disruptors? Acids that stress your body's normal pH are common in American diets, and animal products are often blamed. Enter wheat, the most commonly ingested grain in the American diet. Grains are the only plant foods that generate acidic by-products. And when your body is chronically acidic, it starts pulling calcium carbonate and calcium phosphates out of your bones to maintain a healthy pH, so reach for calcium-rich recipes to replenish them. Overall, that's bad news for bone health: Your bones could eventually become demineralized, setting you up for osteoporosis and fractures.

Dr. Davis has seen thousands of patients enjoy fewer mood swings, better moods, deeper sleep, and better concentration when wheat is tossed from their diet. Getting off of it comes with short-term challenges, though. About 30 percent of people kicking the wheat habit experience withdrawal symptoms like irritability, extreme fatigue, brain fog, and even depression all signs of addiction. And get this. Wheat's even been implicated in schizophrenia. Davis writes in Wheat Belly, "There have been reports of complete remission of the disease, such as the 72-year-old schizophrenic woman described by Duke University doctors, suffering with delusions, hallucinations, and suicide attempts with sharp objects and cleaning solutions over a period of 53 years, who experienced complete relief from psychosis and suicidal desires within eight days of stopping wheat."

The bread aisle isn't the only place modern wheat hides. It's in tons of processed foods, including many,

Frozen dinners, Salad dressings, Couscous products, Different gums, Canned soups and soup mixes,
Artificial food dyes (and some natural flavorings),
Fast food fries they're often fried in the same oil as breaded chicken. And the list goes on!

Source: L. Zerbe



Soda Companies Influence Policy

Oct 26, 2016 - 0 comments

How Soda Companies Influence Policy Through Ties With Public Health Organizations

https://youtu.be/Qc7jFXOoqPc

Fat Burner

Oct 25, 2016 - 5 comments

  Fat Burner

Shalamar Sibley, M.D., was examining how calorie reduction might affect hormone pathways. On a hunch, she decided to test one more variable: vitamin D. "Researchers have been tracking the relationship between low vitamin D and obesity," says Dr. Sibley. "So I wondered if people's baseline vitamin D levels would predict their ability to lose weight when cutting calories."
Her hunch paid off—big time. People with adequate vitamin D levels at the start of the study tended to lose more weight than those with low levels, even though everyone reduced their calorie intake equally. In fact, even a minuscule increase in a key D precursor caused the study participants to incinerate an additional half pound of flab.

Dr. Sibley's study is just the latest indication that vitamin D could be our special ops agent in the war against body fat. "In the past decade, there's been an explosion of research on vitamin D," says Anthony Norman, Ph.D., a professor emeritus of biochemistry at the University of California at Riverside. For example, a study at Laval University in Quebec City found that people who consumed more dietary vitamin D had less belly fat than people who ate less.

What's the big deal about D? It comes from milk and exposure to sunlight, right? Well, not really. Or at least, not enough of it does. More than a third of American men are deficient in the nutrient—even young, healthy men who live in sunny states. And many more American men—over 50 percent—have suboptimal levels.
"Vitamin D deficiency is one of the most commonly unrecognized medical conditions," says Michael F. Holick, M.D., Ph.D., a professor of medicine at Boston University medical center and author of The Vitamin D Solution. "And that deficiency negatively affects every cell in your body—including your fat cells."

One reason vitamin D has flown under the research radar for so long is because it's more than just a vitamin it's also a hormone, one that plays a role in a remarkable range of body processes. "In the past 20 years, we've found D receptors on up to 40 different tissues, including the heart, pancreas, muscles, immune-system cells, and brain," says Norman. He should know, having discovered the vitamin D receptor on intestinal cells back in 1969. So think of vitamin D as your body's multitasking marvel: Heart disease? Adequate D might be equal to exercise in its ability to ward off this number one killer of men. Blood pressure? D helps keep it down. Diabetes? Yep, studies show that D can combat this, too. Now add to this list the potential to ward off memory loss, certain cancers (including prostate), and even the common cold, and it should come as no surprise that D may also help solve the riddle of your expanding middle. Here's the rundown on the many benefits of boosting your vitamin D.

You'll eat less but feel more satisfied.
When you have adequate vitamin D levels, your body releases more leptin, the hormone that conveys a "we're full, stop eating" message to your brain. Conversely, less D means less leptin and more frequent visits to the line at the Chinese buffet. In fact, an Australian study showed that people who ate a breakfast high in D and calcium (a mineral that works hand in hand with D) blunted their appetites for the next 24 hours. Vitamin D deficiency is also linked to insulin resistance, which leads to hunger and overeating, says Liz Applegate, Ph.D., director of sports nutrition at the University of California at Davis.

When you have enough D in your bloodstream, fat cells slow their efforts to make and store fat, says Dr. Holick. But when your D is low, levels of parathyroid hormone (PTH) and a second hormone, calcitrol, rise, and that's bad: High levels of these hormones turn your body into a fat miser, encouraging it to hoard fat instead of burning it, says Michael B. Zemel, Ph.D., director of the nutrition institute at the University of Tennessee. In fact, a Norwegian study found that elevated PTH levels increased a man's risk of becoming overweight by 40 percent.

You'll burn more fat—especially belly fat.
Vitamin D can help you lose lard all over, but it's particularly helpful for the pounds above your belt. Studies at the University of Minnesota and Laval University found that D triggers weight loss primarily in the belly. One explanation: The nutrient may work with calcium to reduce production of cortisol, a stress hormone that causes you to store belly fat, says Zemel.

One of Zemel's studies found that a diet high in dairy (which means plenty of calcium and vitamin D) helped people lose 70 percent more weight than a diet with the same number of calories but without high levels of those nutrients. What's more, a German study showed that high levels of vitamin D actually increased the benefits of weight loss, improving cardiovascular risk markers like triglycerides.

When sunlight hits your skin, your body's built-in vitamin D factory kicks into operation, producing a form of the nutrient that lasts twice as long in your bloodstream as when you consume it through food or a supplement. The problem, of course, is a little thing called skin cancer: In order to manufacture enough D, you'd need to be in the sun during the peak hours of 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. without sunscreen, says Dr. Holick. But even if you could take cancer out of the equation, the amount of sunlight-derived D your body can produce depends on your location. People who live north of the equator probably make only 10 to 20 percent as much D in April as they do in June. And come December, a northerner's skin can produce hardly any D, says Dr. Holick. Even living in a sunny city is no guarantee of adequate natural D. Air pollution filters UVB rays, so less of them are able to reach your skin. That's one reason folks who live in Los Angeles and Atlanta tend to be deficient despite their sunny locations.

Supplementing is a good idea. In fact, the Institute of Medicine recently unveiled a new D recommendation for food and/or supplements: 600 international units (IU) a day. But even that might not be enough. "The Institute of Medicine is extremely cautious," says the University of California's Norman. "Its guidelines are based on what it considers good for bone health, but that doesn't address what's needed to benefit the immune system, pancreas, muscles, heart, and brain." Instead, Norman argues that men may need a 1,000 to 2,000 IU supplement plus a D-rich diet. Turns out, this view is shared by a group of experts in all things hormonal: The Endocrine Society recently released a revised recommendation of 1,500 to 2,000 IU a day for good health.

Still, even that elevated recommendation is just a starting point. If you're overweight (that is, if your body mass index, or BMI, is over 25), you probably need more D. Body fat traps vitamin D in a Georges St-Pierre–style choke hold, preventing it from being used in your body. And the heavier you are, the more D is trapped and the less is available in your bloodstream. According to Dr. Holick, obese people (those with BMIs above 30) require two to five times the vitamin D that lean people need—a dosage that should be monitored by a doctor, of course. It's less clear how much vitamin D you need if you are overweight but not obese, but somewhere between 2,000 and 4,000 IU is a safe bet, says Dr. Holick.

The other problem with trying to ingest all that D from a handful of pills is that you may not reap the fat-burning benefits you were hoping for. "Dietary sources of D usually contain complementary nutrients that also contribute to weight loss," says Dr. Holick. Bottom line: A supplement is just that.

Try the following recipe! with over 1,400 IU by eating the following

Grilled wild salmon, 900 IU
Lightly brush 6-ounce fillets with olive oil and sprinkle them with salt and pepper. Grill them skin side down for about 5 minutes; then flip them and grill until the flesh flakes when you prod the centers with a fork, 3 to 5 minutes more.

Dill-yogurt sauce, 30 IU
Serve the salmon with this quick yogurt sauce; a batch serves four. Mix 1 cup of vitamin D– fortified plain yogurt with half a cucumber (grated), 1 tablespoon of lemon juice, 2 teaspoons of chopped fresh dill, 1 minced garlic clove, and salt and pepper to taste.

Balsamic-glazed mushrooms and onions, 400 IU
You won't find a lot of vitamin D in most produce—except Monterey Mushrooms, a brand of specialty mushrooms that have been exposed to UVB light. Use them in this easy side: On a baking sheet, toss 3 ounces of sliced mushrooms and ½ cup of sliced onions with olive oil and good-quality balsamic vinegar. Roast at 350°F until the mushrooms are lightly browned and glazed, about 40 minutes, stirring occasionally. Toss with chopped parsley.

Dessert...
Berry smoothie, 120 IU
In a blender, puree a handful of berries with a cup of D-fortified yogurt or kefir. Pour into a bowl; top with more berries and add cinnamon, which works along with D to help control blood sugar and insulin response.

Source: A. Bowman

Back Pain Relief Exercises in Office

Oct 25, 2016 - 0 comments

Back Pain Relief Exercises in Office

https://youtu.be/77EEeZ_qk8o