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Tea Consumption and Neurocognitive Disorders

Apr 17, 2017 - 1 comments

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27925140

Eyes of Eagles

Apr 17, 2017 - 1 comments

The Eyes of Eagles
An eagle's flight from the top of the world's tallest building to his handler below. An eagle was fitted with a camera and released from the top of the 2,715 foot Burj Khalifa tower in Dubai.

The eagle has no idea where the tiny speck of land was that his handler is standing on or what it looked like among all of the other islands and buildings and people. Somehow from that altitude, the eagle actually picks out and recognizes the trainer from all of the other objects, people, etc. You can see him looking, looking, looking for the trainer, completely invisible to a human eye and the camera, then fold his/her wings and then drops like a bullet straight to that trainer... very cool.

What surprised the experts is not only how efficiently the eagle spots his trainer from that altitude, but how smooth its flight is with no camera shake whatsoever, even when it goes into a power dive.

https://www.youtube.com/embed/6g95E4VSfj0?rel=0



Eyes of Eagles

Apr 17, 2017 - 1 comments

The Eyes of Eagles
An eagle's flight from the top of the world's tallest building to his handler below. An eagle was fitted with a camera and released from the top of the 2,715 foot Burj Khalifa tower in Dubai.

The eagle has no idea where the tiny speck of land was that his handler is standing on or what it looked like among all of the other islands and buildings and people. Somehow from that altitude, the eagle actually picks out and recognizes the trainer from all of the other objects, people, etc. You can see him looking, looking, looking for the trainer, completely invisible to a human eye and the camera, then fold his/her wings and then drops like a bullet straight to that trainer... very cool.

What surprised the experts is not only how efficiently the eagle spots his trainer from that altitude, but how smooth its flight is with no camera shake whatsoever, even when it goes into a power dive.

https://www.youtube.com/embed/6g95E4VSfj0?rel=0



Death and IV infusion of turmeric

Apr 09, 2017 - 3 comments

On March 16, 2017, a San Diego, California woman died days after receiving an IV infusion of turmeric.
Jade Erick, age 30, suffered a brain injury and cardiac arrest after receiving the first 5 mL of a 250 mL infusion of turmeric in the office of a naturopathic doctor. She was admitted to the hospital but died six days later.
According to NBC News San Diego, Erick's autopsy report concluded she died of "severe anoxic brain injury secondary to cardiopulmonary arrest, most likely due to turmeric infusion."
Erick had sought treatment from the doctor for eczema. She had taken turmeric supplements in the past, but had never before had an infusion. The medical examiner's report also noted she had multiple food allergies to soy protein, lactose and gluten as well as hypothyroidism and pre-diabetes.
Her death has been ruled an accident.
Intravenous administration of curcumin (from turmeric) has been used in some clinical trials for gallbladder disease and breast cancer and was generally well-tolerated; there are no clinical studies on the use of intravenous curcumin for eczema (Gupta, AAPSJ 2013). [Note that turmeric/curcumin supplements may increase pain and contractions in people passing gallstones].