All Journal Entries Journals
Sort By:  

need a title -

Feb 08, 2016 - 2 comments

NEED TO INCLUDE:  

--> Evidence that health promotion works
--> Why the government have to make a difference

http://www.nps.org.au/publications/health-professional/health-news-evidence/2013/NHMRC-dietary-guidelines

New NHMRC Australian Dietary Guidelines are now available. These replace the previous 2003 guidelines but apart from recommending an increased consumption of low fat dairy products there are few changes.

These guidelines have been developed to ensure Australians get enough of the nutrients essential for good health and to help in selecting the types and amounts of the foods and drinks which reduce the risk of chronic health problems such as heart disease, type 2 diabetes, some cancers and obesity. However the updated 2013 guidelines report that “if current trends continue in Australia, it is estimated that by 2025, 83% of men and 75% of women aged 20 years or more will be overweight or obese.”

Do the guidelines go far enough, and are we doing enough, to help address our growing diabetes and obesity epidemics?

____________________________________________________________________________________________

Nutrition Australia is a non-government, non-profit, community based-organisation with offices throughout Australia. Nutrition Australia is an independent, member organisation that aims to promote the health and wellbeing of all Australians.

The Australian Nutrition Foundation Inc was founded in 1979, became incorporated in 1981, and commenced trading as Nutrition Australia in 2001. Nutrition Australia continues the work of the Australian Nutrition Foundation (ANF) as Australia's peak community nutrition education body, to provide scientifically based nutrition information to encourage all Australians to achieve optimal health through food variety and physical activity.

Members of Nutrition Australia include the general public and some of Australia's most influential food and nutrition experts, together making Nutrition Australia a key nutrition voice in Australia today.

Nutrition Australia operates through a National Board which is responsible for its policies and national programs. Our divisions respond to local needs and opportunities for nutrition education and health promotion. Nutrition Australia has staff with expertise in a range of disciplines. The range of services offered by Nutrition Australia includes:

Provision of the latest information on nutrition research and current food and health trends
Coordination of events in the annual National Nutrition Week campaign
Facilitation of high-profile seminars for the general public and health professionals
Extensive media coverage and public speaking demonstrations
Media commentary
Food industry consultancies
Nutrition training and presentations
Menu assessments
Provision of products and services to address food and nutrition issues across the lifespan
Facilitation of a range of community nutrition education and food preparation programs
Facilitation of workplace health and wellbeing programs
The Australia Nutrition Foundation is a registered association, registered in the ACT No A0078, at Chifley Health Hub, 5/70 Maclaurin Crescent, Chifley ACT 2606. Email ***@**** or click here to contact us.

---------------------------------------------------------\

Think you've seen something that looks like it before? You're probably right. There are many triangle-shaped food selection models around, says Nutrition Australia, the non-profit, non-government nutrition education group behind the new model.

All have been built on a 'more to less' concept developed in Sweden in the 1970s. Australia's first pyramid dates back to the 1980s and there have been numerous iterations since. The last update was 15 years ago, with a couple of design refreshes since.

As an 'at a glance' way to grasp our most up-to-date understanding of good nutrition, here are some key points from the latest pyramid to take on board.

----------------------------------------------------------
Updating the Pyramid

Healthy Eating PyramidNutrition Australia’s Pyramid has continually evolved for over 30 years, always with the same aim: to encourage Australians to eat a varied and balanced diet in line with current dietary guidelines.

In 2015, Nutrition Australia launched the new Pyramid with a fresh look and targeted health messages.

The 2015 Healthy Eating Pyramid depicts the types and proportions of foods the average Australian should consume in one day for good health. It depicts whole foods and minimally-processed foods in the five core food groups, plus healthy fats, as the foundation of a balanced diet that’s based on the Australian Dietary Guidelines (2013).

It also encourages drinking water, enjoying herbs and spices, and limiting salt and added sugar.

Food and Nutrition
Nutrition Australia has made a significant contribution to the education and improvement of health and wellbeing of Australians. However, the need for nutrition education continues as statistics show that a significant percentage of Australians are overweight and obese and suffer from conditions associated with diets of excess.

As part of our commitment to provide up-to-date, evidence-based nutrition information, Nutrition Australia offers a number of resources to keep you informed with what's new in nutrition.

Please select from one of the options below:

Fact sheets
Nut-Net FAQs
Recipes
Online shop: Educational books, posters and resources


----------------------------------------------
Resources and Fact Sheets
Title Category
Healthy eating out of the home General Nutrition, Children, Adolescents, Adults, Older Adults
Easy ways to get more fruit and veg in your day General Nutrition, Children, Adolescents, Adults, Older Adults, Sports Nutrition
Simple solutions for using up fruit General Nutrition, Children, Adolescents, Adults, Older Adults
Simple solutions for using up vegetables General Nutrition, Children, Adolescents, Adults, Older Adults
Fruit and vegetable nutrition information National Nutrition Week 2015, General Nutrition, Children, Adolescents, Adults, Older Adults
Fruit and vegetable recipes National Nutrition Week 2015, General Nutrition, Children, Adolescents, Adults, Older Adults
Education tools to promote fruit and vegetables National Nutrition Week 2015, General Nutrition, Children, Adolescents
Fruit and vegetable meal and snack ideas National Nutrition Week 2015, General Nutrition, Children, Adolescents, Adults, Older Adults
Reduce your fruit and vegetable waste National Nutrition Week 2015, General Nutrition, Children, Adolescents, Adults, Older Adults
Kitchen tips for using fruit and veg National Nutrition Week 2015, General Nutrition, Children, Adolescents, Adults, Older Adults
Whats in season National Nutrition Week 2015, General Nutrition, Children, Adolescents, Adults, Older Adults
Growing fruit and vegetables National Nutrition Week 2015, General Nutrition, Children, Adolescents, Adults, Older Adults
Buying fruit and vegetables National Nutrition Week 2015, General Nutrition, Children, Adolescents, Adults, Older Adults
National Nutrition Week 2015 resources National Nutrition Week 2015, General Nutrition, Children, Adolescents, Adults, Older Adults
Water and quitting smoking General Nutrition, Adults, Older Adults
Exercise and quitting smoking General Nutrition, Adults, Older Adults, Physical Activity
Breakfast and quitting smoking General Nutrition, Adults, Older Adults
Weight gain and quitting smoking General Nutrition, Adults, Older Adults
Healthy Eating Pyramid General Nutrition, Children, Adolescents, Adults, Older Adults
Australian Dietary Guidelines: Recommended daily intakes General Nutrition, Children, Adolescents, Adults, Older Adults
Australian Dietary Guidelines: Standard serves General Nutrition, Children, Adolescents, Adults, Older Adults
Nuts in schools General Nutrition, Children
Nuts, health and kids General Nutrition, Children
Breakfast General Nutrition
Fibre General Nutrition
Iron General Nutrition
Australian Dietary Guidelines 2013 General Nutrition, Children, Adolescents, Adults, Older Adults
Vegetable snacks for kids Children
Training toddlers' taste buds Children
Packing a school lunchbox Children
1 2 3 next ›


----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Healthy Eating Pyramid
Nutrition Australia's new Healthy Eating Pyramid is here!

The Healthy Eating Pyramid is a simple visual guide to the types and proportion of foods that we should eat every day for good health.

It contains the five core food groups, plus healthy fats, according to how much they contribute to a balanced diet based on the Australian Dietary Guidelines (2013).

The layers of the Pyramid are based on the recommended food intake for 19–50 year olds according to the Australian Dietary Guidelines (2013). However the proportions and placement of each food group are generally applicable to all age groups from 1–70 years.


The Healthy Eating Pyramid encourages Australians to
enjoy a variety of foods from every food group, every day.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
################################################################
http://medicaleconomics.modernmedicine.com/medical-economics/content/tags/american-heart-association/new-obesity-guidelines-help-physicians-and?page=full


Few health problems pose a greater threat to patients than obesity and its related ailments. Primary care physicians are on the front lines of the battle against obesity. That’s why, experts say, it’s critical for doctors to find ways of instituting health and behavioral modification programs into their practices to help patients make meaningful lifestyle changes.


###################################################

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Obesity_in_Australia

Obesity in Australia is an "epidemic"[2] with "increasing frequency."[2][3] The Medical Journal of Australia found that obesity in Australia more than doubled in the two decades preceding 2003,[4] and the unprecedented rise in obesity has been compared to the same health crisis in America.[4] The rise in obesity has been attributed to poor eating habits in the country closely related to the availability of fast food since the 1970s,[5][6] sedentary lifestyles and a decrease in the labour workforce.[7][8][9]

In a study published in 2015 by the US journal of Economics and Human Biology, obesity is found to have the largest impact on men aged over 75, and women aged between 60-74.[11

Indigenous Australians have Australia's highest level of obesity.[16] A 2001 study showing that 31% of Aborigines and Torres Strait Islanders were obese, nearly double the national average at that time.[16]

The percentage of overweight and obese children in Australia, despite rapid increases in the 1980s and the first half of the 1990s, have remained mostly steady for the past 10 years, with 23 to 24% of Australians under the age of 18 classified as overweight, and 5 to 6% of the same demographic classified as obese.[2]

##########################################################################

Health Promotion and Prevention
We acknowledge HealthInfoNet for providing most of the information on this page

Introduction
Health promotion has been described as:

‘the process of enabling people to increase control over, and to improve their health. To reach a state of complete physical, mental and social wellbeing an individual or group must be able to identify and realise aspirations, to satisfy needs and to change or cope with the environment.’ [1]

or, more simply, as

‘the combination of educational and environmental supports for actions and conditions of living conducive to health. [2] Health promotion includes social, environmental and political processes that encourage individuals, groups of people and populations to increase control over, and to improve their health. Health promotion draws on a number of disciplines, including public health, political science, education, communication, anthropology, epidemiology, sociology and psychology.’

Basic principles of health promotion were included in the Ottawa Charter, which was adopted at the first international health promotion conference [1]. The Charter provided a statement of action for health promotion and guidance in defining action areas. The five priority health promotion action areas identified were:

building healthy public policy;
creating supportive environments for health;
strengthening community action for health;
developing personal skills; and
re-orienting health services.

http://www.naccho.org.au/aboriginal-health/health-promotion-and-prevention/

###########################################################################

The development of formal health promotion activities is, however, fairly recent. The establishment of the World Health Organization in 1948 is seen as an important stage in this development (view webpage on ACT Health Promotion website).

################################################

Do we need a healthier food pyramid? Six nutritionists suggest a modern alternative to the carb-heavy 1970's pyramid blamed for the obesity crisis.

http://www.fitnessfirst.com.au/healthy-eating/the-new-food-pyramid/

##########################################################################3
Healthy Food Pyramid updated for the first time in 15 years

2:07 PM Saturday May 23, 2015
Save
Like on Facebook
3.6k
Twitter
0
Post on LinkedIn
97
+1 on Google+
31
Health Health & Wellbeing Your Health
The new Healthy Food Pyramid is based on the 2013 Australian Dietary Guidelines.
Photo / 123RF
The new Healthy Food Pyramid is based on the 2013 Australian Dietary Guidelines. Photo / 123RF
Australians have been given a new guideline on healthy eating for the first time in 15 years, as industry experts call for sugar and junk food to be dumped from all diets.

Nutrition Australia has updated its Healthy Eating Pyramid after it remained unchanged since 1999, and the new version includes some hip foods that would have been hard to find on a supermarket shelf in the 90s.

Photo / Nutrition Australia
Photo / Nutrition Australia
The new pyramid includes soy milk, quinoa and tofu for the first time, along with traditional staples such as fruit, vegetables, grains and dairy products.

It also rules out junk food entirely, and calls for people to cut added sugar and salt out of their diet immediately.

Nutrition Australia executive officer Lucinda Hancock said the pyramid can help all Australians.

"The foundation is the same as the original healthy eating pyramid - to have a plant-based diet with 70 per cent of your diet made up of fruit vegetables and grains," Ms Hancock told Ninemsn.

"The majority of Australians don't follow the Dietary Guidelines so we want to provide a different tool to help people cut through [incorrect information] and identify what they need to eat.

"What we have focused on now is increasing wholegrains and not having any junk food - we just don't need it. That's really what's causing obesity in Australia."

She also said the new pyramid will help "cut through a lot of the misleading information about fad diets".

The new pyramid was decided upon after updated Australian Dietary Guidelines were released in 2013.

"The release of updated Australian Dietary Guidelines in 2013 prompted us to revise and update the Healthy Living Pyramid to reflect the current dietary evidence base, population health messages and consumer needs," a statement released by Nutrition Australia reads.

"While much time and thought has been put into the new design, the new Healthy Eating Pyramid is essentially a new twist on a consistent theme: enjoy a variety of foods from the five food groups, choose mostly plant-based foods, limit added saturated fats, sugar and salt, and choose water as your main drink.

"The new Pyramid maintains the original messages above, while providing more definition about how much each food group contributes to a daily diet. We also updated the variety of foods that are available within each food group, to reflect current dietary behaviours and encourage variety."

The Healthy Eating Pyramid is designed to help Australians have a better understanding of the sorts of food they should be eating on a daily basis, and the ones they should steer clear from indulging in each day.

It was first introduced in 1980.

The original Health Eating Pyramids from 1982 and 1986.
Photo / Nutrition Australia
The original Health Eating Pyramids from 1982 and 1986. Photo / Nutrition Australia
The Healthy Eating Pyramid received a major design update in 1999 and in 2004 a Health Living Pyramid was designed.
Photo / Nutrition Australia
The Healthy Eating Pyramid received a major design update in 1999 and in 2004 a Health Living Pyramid was designed. Photo / Nutrition Australia
What has changed in the new Healthy Food Pyramid


• Each layer has been separated into specific foods groups, to provide that greater level of detail, while still retaining the original Pyramid structure.
• Added sugar was removed from the top layer of the pyramid, and added to the salt shaker section in an effort to show the importance of limiting added sugars as well.
• The pyramid ad

vocates for fresh, dried or ground herbs and spices as an alternative for salt or sugar, by adding a 'enjoy herbs and spices' section.
• The "eat only in small amounts" layer of the pyramid now only refers to healthy fats, compared to previous pyramids when it referred to all added fats.
Join the conversation on the Herald Life Facebook

http://www.nzherald.co.nz/lifestyle/news/article.cfm?c_id=6&objectid=11451171

#####################################################################################
http://www.health.gov.au/internet/preventativehealth/publishing.nsf/content/E233F8695823F16CCA2574DD00818E64/$File/obesity-jul09.pdf

Australian Government
Preventative Health Taskforce
AUSTRALIA:
THE HEALTHIEST
COUNTRY BY 2020

Technical Report 1
Obesity in Australia: a need for urgent action
Including addendum for October 2008 to June 2009
Prepared for the National Preventative Health Taskforce
by the Obesity Working Group

1 Executive summary 1
2 Obesity in Australia 5
2.1 Health, social and economic impact of obesity 5
2.2 Those at special risk 6
2.3 Trends and scale of the problem 9
2.4 Trends in weight gain by age 10
2.5 Middle-aged and older Australians 11
3 Obesity prevention 13
3.1 What could be achieved in obesity control 13
3.2 What is required to address the problem 15
3.2.1 Prompt action 15
3.2.2 Multi-faceted, multi-sectoral response 15
3.2.3 Leadership and coordination 15
3.2.4 Role of individuals 16
3.2.5 Role of governments 16
3.2.6 Role of healthcare systems 16
3.2.7 Social determinants of health 17
3.2.8 The environment 17
3.2.9 Working with industry 17
3.2.10 Population-wide focus 18
3.2.11 High-risk groups 18
3.2.12 Costs 19
3.2.13 Research, monitoring and evaluation 19
iii
4 Potential initiatives 21
4.1 Reshaping the food supply towards lower risk products and pricing 21
4.2 Food composition 24
4.3 Food subsidies 25
4.4 Protect children and others from inappropriate
advertising of unhealthy foods and beverages 27
4.5 Improve public education and information 31
4.5.1 Social marketing 31
4.5.2 Food labelling 33
4.6 Reshape urban environments towards healthy options 34
4.6.1 The school setting 35
4.6.2 The community setting 35
4.6.3 The workplace setting 37
4.6.4 Town planning and building design 39
4.6.5 Active environments 40
4.7 Strengthen, upskill and support primary health care and public
health workforce to support people in making healthier choices 42
4.7.1 Health workforce 42
4.7.2 Guidelines and training 43
4.7.3 Primary healthcare settings 44
4.8 Maternal and child health 45
4.9 Close the gap for disadvantaged communities 46
4.10 Build the evidence base, monitor and evaluate effectiveness of actions 47
Conclusion 51
References 55
Addendum for October 2008 to June 2009



                     reading through the government info.....

#################################################

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4606744/
Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health


Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health
Wiley-Blackwell, John Wiley & Sons
Aust N Z J Public Health. 2015 Oct; 39(5): 452–457.
Published online 2015 Oct 6. doi:  10.1111/1753-6405.12458
PMCID: PMC4606744
Cancers in Australia in 2010 attributable to overweight and obesity
Bradley J Kendall,1,2 Louise F Wilson,1 Catherine M Olsen,1,3 Penelope M Webb,1,3 Rachel E Neale,1,3 Christopher J Bain,1,4 and David C Whiteman1,3
Author information ► Article notes ► Copyright and License information ►
Go to:
Abstract
Objectives

To estimate the proportion and number of cancers occurring in Australia in 2010 attributable to overweight/obesity.

Methods

We estimated the population attributable fraction (PAF) and number of cancers causally associated with overweight/obesity. We used standard formulae incorporating Australian prevalence data for body mass index (BMI), relative risks associated with BMI and cancer. We also estimated the proportion change in cancer incidence (potential impact fraction [PIF]) that may have occurred assuming that the prevalence of overweight/obesity had remained at 1990 levels.

Results

An estimated 3,917 cancer cases (3.4% of all cancers) diagnosed in 2010 were attributable to overweight/obesity, including 1,101 colon cancers, 971 female post-menopausal breast cancers and 595 endometrial cancers (PAFs of 10%, 8% and 26%, respectively). Highest PAFs were observed for oesophageal adenocarcinoma (31%), endometrial cancer (26%) and kidney cancer (19%). If the prevalence of overweight/obesity in Australia had remained at levels prevailing in 1990, we estimate there would have been 820 fewer cancers diagnosed in 2010 (PIF 2%).

Conclusions

Overweight/obesity causes a substantial number of cancers in Australia.

Implications

Public health strategies to reduce the prevalence of overweight and obesity will reduce the incidence of cancer, particularly of the colon, breast and endometrium.

Keywords: population attributable fraction, cancer, risk factor, obesity, potential impact fraction
Similar articles in PubMed
Cancers in Australia in 2010 attributable to insufficient physical activity.
[Aust N Z J Public Health. 2015]
Cancers in Australia in 2010 attributable to the consumption of alcohol.




MARCY REWRITE FOR BEGINNING PARAGRAPH

Like many other industrialised countries, overweight and obesity is one of Australia's leading health issues,1 with prevalence increasing steadily over the past 30 years.2 Obesity is more prevalent among the most disadvantaged socioeconomic groups, such as people without post-school qualifications, Indigenous Australians and some migrant groups.2


====================================================
Mercola

In the video above, the late Peter Jennings reports on "how to get fat without really trying." Indeed, if you eat a standard American diet (SAD), you're virtually guaranteed to inadvertently pack on extra pounds, even if you think you're eating healthy.

Presently, a full two-thirds of Americans are overweight or obese, and childhood obesity has tripled over the past 30 years.

While the American agricultural system may be the envy of many less affluent nations, it also has many unintended consequences, as Jennings points out. One of them is a food system that promotes cheap food largely devoid of nutrients and chockfull of unhealthy ingredients that has caused obesity rates to skyrocket.

If you're like most people, you probably do not know that there is NO link between agricultural subsidies and nutrition. This important fact is revealed in Jennings' report, and this is a major part of the problem.

Directly related to this issue is the fact that the government's nutritional guidelines are in large part mirrored by these same agricultural subsidies, rather than being built upon sound nutritional science.

The original food pyramid created and promoted by the US Department of Agriculture (USDA), told you that the "base" of your diet should consist of grains, pasta and breads, despite the evidence showing that grains, which break down into sugar in your body, promotes fat accumulation and drives insulin resistance and related diseases, including diabetes, heart disease and cancer.

In short, the reason you're told to make grains the cornerstone of your diet is because that's what farmers are paid to grow in the US. There's a lot of it, and it's inexpensive compared to healthier foods like vegetables, for which few subsidies are offered.

Conventional Farming Promotes Consumption of Unhealthy Foods

There's no denying the fact that modern agricultural practices promote the consumption of an unhealthy diet. Today's sky-high rates of obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease can be tied directly to changes in how our food has been grown and produced over the past 40 years.

According to the Environmental Working Group1 (EWG), between 1995 and 2010, a mere 10 percent of American farmers collected 74 percent of all subsidies, amounting to nearly $166 billion over 16 years.

These farm subsidies bring you high-fructose corn syrup, fast food, animal factories, monoculture, and a host of other contributors to our unhealthful contemporary diet.

A report comparing federal subsidies of fresh produce and junk food, prepared by US PIRG, a non-profit organization that takes on special interests on behalf of the public, revealed where your tax dollars are really going and it's quite shocking: If you were to receive an annual federal subsidy directly, you would receive $7.36 to spend on junk food and just 11 cents to buy apples.

Equally astounding is the following statistic gleaned from a recent interview with Michael Pollan,2 in which he points out that according to USDA data, 92 cents of each food dollar now goes to someone other than the farmer—it's actually spent on the various manufacturing and packaging processes associated with processed foods.

"We're not going to undo that unless we buy more directly from farmers and buy unprocessed food," he says.

And I think that's a crucial point, really. Imagine if food growers could get most or all of each food dollar instead of it being spent on plastic wrappers and food processing! Then they might actually be able to afford growing something other than corn, soy and wheat, which are three of the unhealthiest staples of the processed food industry...

Following USDA Diet Recommendations Is a Recipe for Obesity

Some of you may be old enough to recall the 1992 Food Pyramid, which had grains as the largest bottom block of the pyramid, encouraging you to eat 6-11 servings of bread, cereal, rice and pasta each day. This excess of carbohydrates, most of them refined, is precisely the opposite of what most people need to stay healthy. At the very top of the pyramid was fats and sugar, and while sugar clearly belongs there, healthy fats do not. In fact, most people would benefit from getting anywhere from 50 to 70 percent of their total calories from healthy fats!

The food pyramid was replaced with "MyPlate"3 in 2011, which slightly downplayed grains as the most important dietary ingredient, making vegetables the largest "slice," but it still has a long way to go before it will offer a meal plan that will truly support your optimal health.

One of its most glaring faults is that MyPlate virtually removed all fats from the equation! In fact, except for a small portion of dairy, which is advised to be fat-free or low-fat, fats are missing entirely... There is no mention of the importance of dietary fats, even the "politically correct" ones like the monounsaturated fats in olive oil and nuts, such as pecans (canola oil is also in this category, but I advise avoiding it and using coconut oil instead).

Of course, one of the most important of the healthy fats is animal-based omega-3, which is also absent from the plate. Deficiency in this essential fat can cause or contribute to very serious health problems, both mental and physical, and may be a significant underlying factor of up to 96,000 premature deaths each year. For more information about omega-3s and the best sources of this fat, please review this previous article.

Not surprisingly, the US government still has not acknowledged the ever mounting data showing that saturated fat is actually an incredibly healthy, nourishing, and all-natural fat that humans have been thriving on for generations. It provides the necessary building blocks for your cell membranes and a variety of hormones and hormone-like substances that are critical to your health. Saturated fats from animal and vegetable sources, such as coconut oil, avocado, non-CAFO meat and dairy, also provide a concentrated source of energy in your diet.

When you eat fats as part of your meal, they also slow down absorption so that you can feel satiated longer, which helps curb overeating. In addition, they act as carriers for important fat-soluble vitamins A, D, E and K, and are needed for mineral absorption and a host of other biological processes. To get these healthy saturated fats in your diet, you need to eat animal foods like butter and other full-fat raw dairy products and eggs, yet these foods are still demonized by the establishment.

What a Food Pyramid Based on Nutritional Science Really Looks Like

In an effort to remedy the situation, I've created my own food pyramid for optimal health (below), which you can print out and share with your friends and family. My pyramid, which is based on nutritional science opposed to agricultural subsidies and industry lobbying efforts, is almost the inverse of the original USDA food pyramid, featuring healthful fats and vegetables on the bottom. Again, most people would benefit from getting at least 50 percent of your daily calories from healthful fats, such as avocados, coconut oil, nuts, and raw butter. In terms of bulk or quantity, vegetables should be the most prominent feature on your plate. Veggies provide countless critical nutrients, while being sparse on calories.

Next comes high quality proteins, followed by a moderate amount of fruits, and lastly, at the very top, you'll find grains and sugars. This last top tier of sugars and grains can be eliminated entirely, and your health just might become the envy of everyone around you... While this may sound impossible to some, I can attest to the fact that quitting carbs is doable. In fact, once you've successfully switched over from burning carbs to burning fat as your body's primary fuel, carb cravings actually disappear, as if by magic. There are two primary ways to achieve this metabolic switch, and these strategies support each other when combined:

Intermittent fasting: I prefer daily intermittent fasting, but you could also fast a couple of days a week if you prefer, or every other day. There are many different variations. To be effective, in the case of daily intermittent fasting, the length of your fast must be at least eight hours long. This means eating only between the hours of 11am until 7pm, as an example. Essentially, this equates to simply skipping breakfast, and making lunch your first meal of the day instead
A ketogenic diet: This type of diet, in which you replace carbs with low to moderate amounts of high quality protein and high amounts of beneficial fat, is what I recommend for everyone, and is exactly what you get if you focus on the bottom three tiers of my food pyramid


Other Atrocious Health Recommendations That Drive Obesity and Disease Rates

Make no mistake about it, obesity is the result of inappropriate lifestyle choices, and unfortunately, our government has spent decades disseminating astoundingly inaccurate information about diet and health. In many ways, the US government has become little more than a propagator of corporate-sponsored propaganda. The following is just a tiny sampling of the pervasive misleading information on weight and obesity disseminated by our government agencies:

"All sugars are equal, and are okay in moderation:" The science is overwhelmingly clear on this point: fructose and glucose are NOT metabolized by your body in the same way. For example, while every cell in your body utilizes glucose, thereby burning up much of it, fructose is turned into free fatty acids (FFAs), VLDL (the damaging form of cholesterol), and triglycerides, which get stored as fat. Furthermore, the entire burden of metabolizing fructose falls on your liver, which creates a long list of waste products and toxins, including a large amount of uric acid, which drives up blood pressure and causes gout. It also promotes visceral fat4
When you eat 120 calories of glucose, less than one calorie is stored as fat. 120 calories of fructose results in 40 calories being stored as fat. As a standard recommendation, I advise keeping your total fructose consumption below 25 grams per day, or as little as 15 grams a day if you have insulin resistance, diabetes, high blood pressure, heart disease or are overweight

"To lose weight, just expend more calories than you eat:" This outdated advice has been shown to be patently false, as not all calories are created equal. In a nutshell, counting calories will not help you lose weight if you're consuming the wrong kind of calories
"Choosing diet foods will help you lose weight:" Substances like Splenda (sucralose) and Equal or Nutrasweet (aspartame) may have zero calories, but your body isn't fooled. When it gets a "sweet" taste, it expects calories to follow, and when this doesn't occur it leads to distortions in your biochemistry that actually lead to weight gain
"Avoid saturated fat to protect your heart:" The myth that saturated fat causes heart disease began as little more than a scientifically unsupported marketing strategy for Crisco cooking oil. Most people actually need about 50 to 70 percent of their diet as healthful fats from organic, pastured eggs, avocados, coconut oil, real butter and grass-fed beef in order to optimize their health
"When it comes to cholesterol levels, the lower the better, to avoid heart disease:" Cholesterol is actually NOT the major culprit in heart disease or any disease, and the guidelines that dictate what number your cholesterol levels should be to keep you "healthy" are fraught with conflict of interest -- and have never been proven to be good for your health. Meanwhile, bringing your cholesterol levels down too low can have significant health ramifications, from mood disorders and violence to, ironically, heart disease
Yes, You Can 'Slim Down Without Even Trying...'

Once you realize the root of the problem, which begins with agricultural subsidies that are based on economics and have nothing to do with growing nutrient dense foods for the masses; which in turn has spawned dietary recommendations that are also based on industry profitability opposed to nutritional science, then it becomes easier to understand why a full two-thirds of Americans are overweight or obese. Even the education of registered dietitians is sponsored and taught by the junk food industry!

Sadly, these deeply flawed dietary recommendations fuel the nation's poor health scores, and drive the now colossal health industry, which in turn is run by the pharmaceutical industry... It's really one big vicious circle.

You CAN break free, however.

Perhaps one of the most powerful scientific discoveries to emerge in the past several years is that the old adage "a calorie is a calorie" is patently false. The research clearly demonstrates that even if you control the number of calories you eat, if those calories come primarily from fructose and grains, you are at increased risk of obesity and pre-diabetes, which includes both insulin and leptin resistance, fatty liver, high blood pressure and high triglycerides. Insulin and leptin resistance in turn form the foundation for virtually every chronic disease you can think of, including heart disease and cancer.

The answer, therefore, is to turn the conventional food pyramid on its proverbial head, and dramatically reduce or eliminate virtually all grains and sugars, especially fructose. This in and of itself will go a long way toward preventing accumulation of excess fat. However, to be truly effective, you want to make sure you're replacing those refined carbs with vegetables and healthful fats.

Now you're entering into a diet that will allow your body to shift from burning carbs to burning fat (or ketones) as its primary fuel. At this point, weight loss is not the only benefit you'll reap. Compelling research shows that this type of diet, also referred to as a ketogenic diet, is an effective prevention and even treatment strategy for cancer.

Intermittent fasting is another powerful key that will help you transition your body from obtaining the majority of its fuel from glucose stored as glycogen in your muscles and liver, to the fat stored in your tissues. This is one of the most effective ways I know of to burn off excess body fat and eliminate sugar cravings. These are all things that are well within your power to do. Next, I urge you to become involved with changing the system that has brought us to this unfortunate point in our evolution. Growing sprouts in your home is a powerful way to eat very healthy and inexpensively.

Changing your shopping patterns by supporting local agriculture will not only help improve your health, it will also help improve the environment and bring back our rural communities. One way to get involved is to simply buy more food from your local farmers. It is important to understand the impact you have when you spend your money on processed factory food. For more information on how to find locally-grown foods and farmer's markets, please see my Sustainable Agriculture page. I would also encourage you to support the Environmental Working Group in its current efforts to renew America's food and farm policies through the farm bill.5

ALTHOUGH THESE ARE AMERICAN DOCTORS REDEFINING THE FOOD PYRAMID, IT ALSO COULD BE EXTENDED TO AUSTRALIAN GOVT. FOOD GUIDE. YOU WOULD HAVE TO COMPARE THE TWO.
OBESITY IS A WORLD HEALTH ISSUE SO INCLUDING NEW NUTRITIONAL SCIENCE FROMTHE STATES AS A SOLUTION WOULD SHOULD NOT BE AN ISSUE, OBESITY IS LIKE GLOBAL WARMING. THE SOLUTION MUST COME FROM WORLD SOURCES.

$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$


                                                             working copy  of oral presentation


$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$

Do the guidelines go far enough, and are we doing enough, to help address our growing diabetes and obesity epidemics?


need a title -

Feb 08, 2016 - 0 comments

NEED TO INCLUDE:  

--> Evidence that health promotion works
--> Why the government have to make a difference

http://www.nps.org.au/publications/health-professional/health-news-evidence/2013/NHMRC-dietary-guidelines

New NHMRC Australian Dietary Guidelines are now available. These replace the previous 2003 guidelines but apart from recommending an increased consumption of low fat dairy products there are few changes.

These guidelines have been developed to ensure Australians get enough of the nutrients essential for good health and to help in selecting the types and amounts of the foods and drinks which reduce the risk of chronic health problems such as heart disease, type 2 diabetes, some cancers and obesity. However the updated 2013 guidelines report that “if current trends continue in Australia, it is estimated that by 2025, 83% of men and 75% of women aged 20 years or more will be overweight or obese.”

Do the guidelines go far enough, and are we doing enough, to help address our growing diabetes and obesity epidemics?

____________________________________________________________________________________________

Nutrition Australia is a non-government, non-profit, community based-organisation with offices throughout Australia. Nutrition Australia is an independent, member organisation that aims to promote the health and wellbeing of all Australians.

The Australian Nutrition Foundation Inc was founded in 1979, became incorporated in 1981, and commenced trading as Nutrition Australia in 2001. Nutrition Australia continues the work of the Australian Nutrition Foundation (ANF) as Australia's peak community nutrition education body, to provide scientifically based nutrition information to encourage all Australians to achieve optimal health through food variety and physical activity.

Members of Nutrition Australia include the general public and some of Australia's most influential food and nutrition experts, together making Nutrition Australia a key nutrition voice in Australia today.

Nutrition Australia operates through a National Board which is responsible for its policies and national programs. Our divisions respond to local needs and opportunities for nutrition education and health promotion. Nutrition Australia has staff with expertise in a range of disciplines. The range of services offered by Nutrition Australia includes:

Provision of the latest information on nutrition research and current food and health trends
Coordination of events in the annual National Nutrition Week campaign
Facilitation of high-profile seminars for the general public and health professionals
Extensive media coverage and public speaking demonstrations
Media commentary
Food industry consultancies
Nutrition training and presentations
Menu assessments
Provision of products and services to address food and nutrition issues across the lifespan
Facilitation of a range of community nutrition education and food preparation programs
Facilitation of workplace health and wellbeing programs
The Australia Nutrition Foundation is a registered association, registered in the ACT No A0078, at Chifley Health Hub, 5/70 Maclaurin Crescent, Chifley ACT 2606. Email ***@**** or click here to contact us.

---------------------------------------------------------\

Think you've seen something that looks like it before? You're probably right. There are many triangle-shaped food selection models around, says Nutrition Australia, the non-profit, non-government nutrition education group behind the new model.

All have been built on a 'more to less' concept developed in Sweden in the 1970s. Australia's first pyramid dates back to the 1980s and there have been numerous iterations since. The last update was 15 years ago, with a couple of design refreshes since.

As an 'at a glance' way to grasp our most up-to-date understanding of good nutrition, here are some key points from the latest pyramid to take on board.

----------------------------------------------------------
Updating the Pyramid

Healthy Eating PyramidNutrition Australia’s Pyramid has continually evolved for over 30 years, always with the same aim: to encourage Australians to eat a varied and balanced diet in line with current dietary guidelines.

In 2015, Nutrition Australia launched the new Pyramid with a fresh look and targeted health messages.

The 2015 Healthy Eating Pyramid depicts the types and proportions of foods the average Australian should consume in one day for good health. It depicts whole foods and minimally-processed foods in the five core food groups, plus healthy fats, as the foundation of a balanced diet that’s based on the Australian Dietary Guidelines (2013).

It also encourages drinking water, enjoying herbs and spices, and limiting salt and added sugar.

Food and Nutrition
Nutrition Australia has made a significant contribution to the education and improvement of health and wellbeing of Australians. However, the need for nutrition education continues as statistics show that a significant percentage of Australians are overweight and obese and suffer from conditions associated with diets of excess.

As part of our commitment to provide up-to-date, evidence-based nutrition information, Nutrition Australia offers a number of resources to keep you informed with what's new in nutrition.

Please select from one of the options below:

Fact sheets
Nut-Net FAQs
Recipes
Online shop: Educational books, posters and resources


----------------------------------------------
Resources and Fact Sheets
Title Category
Healthy eating out of the home General Nutrition, Children, Adolescents, Adults, Older Adults
Easy ways to get more fruit and veg in your day General Nutrition, Children, Adolescents, Adults, Older Adults, Sports Nutrition
Simple solutions for using up fruit General Nutrition, Children, Adolescents, Adults, Older Adults
Simple solutions for using up vegetables General Nutrition, Children, Adolescents, Adults, Older Adults
Fruit and vegetable nutrition information National Nutrition Week 2015, General Nutrition, Children, Adolescents, Adults, Older Adults
Fruit and vegetable recipes National Nutrition Week 2015, General Nutrition, Children, Adolescents, Adults, Older Adults
Education tools to promote fruit and vegetables National Nutrition Week 2015, General Nutrition, Children, Adolescents
Fruit and vegetable meal and snack ideas National Nutrition Week 2015, General Nutrition, Children, Adolescents, Adults, Older Adults
Reduce your fruit and vegetable waste National Nutrition Week 2015, General Nutrition, Children, Adolescents, Adults, Older Adults
Kitchen tips for using fruit and veg National Nutrition Week 2015, General Nutrition, Children, Adolescents, Adults, Older Adults
Whats in season National Nutrition Week 2015, General Nutrition, Children, Adolescents, Adults, Older Adults
Growing fruit and vegetables National Nutrition Week 2015, General Nutrition, Children, Adolescents, Adults, Older Adults
Buying fruit and vegetables National Nutrition Week 2015, General Nutrition, Children, Adolescents, Adults, Older Adults
National Nutrition Week 2015 resources National Nutrition Week 2015, General Nutrition, Children, Adolescents, Adults, Older Adults
Water and quitting smoking General Nutrition, Adults, Older Adults
Exercise and quitting smoking General Nutrition, Adults, Older Adults, Physical Activity
Breakfast and quitting smoking General Nutrition, Adults, Older Adults
Weight gain and quitting smoking General Nutrition, Adults, Older Adults
Healthy Eating Pyramid General Nutrition, Children, Adolescents, Adults, Older Adults
Australian Dietary Guidelines: Recommended daily intakes General Nutrition, Children, Adolescents, Adults, Older Adults
Australian Dietary Guidelines: Standard serves General Nutrition, Children, Adolescents, Adults, Older Adults
Nuts in schools General Nutrition, Children
Nuts, health and kids General Nutrition, Children
Breakfast General Nutrition
Fibre General Nutrition
Iron General Nutrition
Australian Dietary Guidelines 2013 General Nutrition, Children, Adolescents, Adults, Older Adults
Vegetable snacks for kids Children
Training toddlers' taste buds Children
Packing a school lunchbox Children
1 2 3 next ›


----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Healthy Eating Pyramid
Nutrition Australia's new Healthy Eating Pyramid is here!

The Healthy Eating Pyramid is a simple visual guide to the types and proportion of foods that we should eat every day for good health.

It contains the five core food groups, plus healthy fats, according to how much they contribute to a balanced diet based on the Australian Dietary Guidelines (2013).

The layers of the Pyramid are based on the recommended food intake for 19–50 year olds according to the Australian Dietary Guidelines (2013). However the proportions and placement of each food group are generally applicable to all age groups from 1–70 years.


The Healthy Eating Pyramid encourages Australians to
enjoy a variety of foods from every food group, every day.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
################################################################
http://medicaleconomics.modernmedicine.com/medical-economics/content/tags/american-heart-association/new-obesity-guidelines-help-physicians-and?page=full


Few health problems pose a greater threat to patients than obesity and its related ailments. Primary care physicians are on the front lines of the battle against obesity. That’s why, experts say, it’s critical for doctors to find ways of instituting health and behavioral modification programs into their practices to help patients make meaningful lifestyle changes.


###################################################

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Obesity_in_Australia

Obesity in Australia is an "epidemic"[2] with "increasing frequency."[2][3] The Medical Journal of Australia found that obesity in Australia more than doubled in the two decades preceding 2003,[4] and the unprecedented rise in obesity has been compared to the same health crisis in America.[4] The rise in obesity has been attributed to poor eating habits in the country closely related to the availability of fast food since the 1970s,[5][6] sedentary lifestyles and a decrease in the labour workforce.[7][8][9]

In a study published in 2015 by the US journal of Economics and Human Biology, obesity is found to have the largest impact on men aged over 75, and women aged between 60-74.[11

Indigenous Australians have Australia's highest level of obesity.[16] A 2001 study showing that 31% of Aborigines and Torres Strait Islanders were obese, nearly double the national average at that time.[16]

The percentage of overweight and obese children in Australia, despite rapid increases in the 1980s and the first half of the 1990s, have remained mostly steady for the past 10 years, with 23 to 24% of Australians under the age of 18 classified as overweight, and 5 to 6% of the same demographic classified as obese.[2]

##########################################################################




need a title -

Feb 08, 2016 - 0 comments

NEED TO INCLUDE:  

--> Evidence that health promotion works
--> Why the government have to make a difference

http://www.nps.org.au/publications/health-professional/health-news-evidence/2013/NHMRC-dietary-guidelines

New NHMRC Australian Dietary Guidelines are now available. These replace the previous 2003 guidelines but apart from recommending an increased consumption of low fat dairy products there are few changes.

These guidelines have been developed to ensure Australians get enough of the nutrients essential for good health and to help in selecting the types and amounts of the foods and drinks which reduce the risk of chronic health problems such as heart disease, type 2 diabetes, some cancers and obesity. However the updated 2013 guidelines report that “if current trends continue in Australia, it is estimated that by 2025, 83% of men and 75% of women aged 20 years or more will be overweight or obese.”

Do the guidelines go far enough, and are we doing enough, to help address our growing diabetes and obesity epidemics?

____________________________________________________________________________________________

Nutrition Australia is a non-government, non-profit, community based-organisation with offices throughout Australia. Nutrition Australia is an independent, member organisation that aims to promote the health and wellbeing of all Australians.

The Australian Nutrition Foundation Inc was founded in 1979, became incorporated in 1981, and commenced trading as Nutrition Australia in 2001. Nutrition Australia continues the work of the Australian Nutrition Foundation (ANF) as Australia's peak community nutrition education body, to provide scientifically based nutrition information to encourage all Australians to achieve optimal health through food variety and physical activity.

Members of Nutrition Australia include the general public and some of Australia's most influential food and nutrition experts, together making Nutrition Australia a key nutrition voice in Australia today.

Nutrition Australia operates through a National Board which is responsible for its policies and national programs. Our divisions respond to local needs and opportunities for nutrition education and health promotion. Nutrition Australia has staff with expertise in a range of disciplines. The range of services offered by Nutrition Australia includes:

Provision of the latest information on nutrition research and current food and health trends
Coordination of events in the annual National Nutrition Week campaign
Facilitation of high-profile seminars for the general public and health professionals
Extensive media coverage and public speaking demonstrations
Media commentary
Food industry consultancies
Nutrition training and presentations
Menu assessments
Provision of products and services to address food and nutrition issues across the lifespan
Facilitation of a range of community nutrition education and food preparation programs
Facilitation of workplace health and wellbeing programs
The Australia Nutrition Foundation is a registered association, registered in the ACT No A0078, at Chifley Health Hub, 5/70 Maclaurin Crescent, Chifley ACT 2606. Email ***@**** or click here to contact us.

---------------------------------------------------------\

Think you've seen something that looks like it before? You're probably right. There are many triangle-shaped food selection models around, says Nutrition Australia, the non-profit, non-government nutrition education group behind the new model.

All have been built on a 'more to less' concept developed in Sweden in the 1970s. Australia's first pyramid dates back to the 1980s and there have been numerous iterations since. The last update was 15 years ago, with a couple of design refreshes since.

As an 'at a glance' way to grasp our most up-to-date understanding of good nutrition, here are some key points from the latest pyramid to take on board.

----------------------------------------------------------
Updating the Pyramid

Healthy Eating PyramidNutrition Australia’s Pyramid has continually evolved for over 30 years, always with the same aim: to encourage Australians to eat a varied and balanced diet in line with current dietary guidelines.

In 2015, Nutrition Australia launched the new Pyramid with a fresh look and targeted health messages.

The 2015 Healthy Eating Pyramid depicts the types and proportions of foods the average Australian should consume in one day for good health. It depicts whole foods and minimally-processed foods in the five core food groups, plus healthy fats, as the foundation of a balanced diet that’s based on the Australian Dietary Guidelines (2013).

It also encourages drinking water, enjoying herbs and spices, and limiting salt and added sugar.

Food and Nutrition
Nutrition Australia has made a significant contribution to the education and improvement of health and wellbeing of Australians. However, the need for nutrition education continues as statistics show that a significant percentage of Australians are overweight and obese and suffer from conditions associated with diets of excess.

As part of our commitment to provide up-to-date, evidence-based nutrition information, Nutrition Australia offers a number of resources to keep you informed with what's new in nutrition.

Please select from one of the options below:

Fact sheets
Nut-Net FAQs
Recipes
Online shop: Educational books, posters and resources


----------------------------------------------
Resources and Fact Sheets
Title Category
Healthy eating out of the home General Nutrition, Children, Adolescents, Adults, Older Adults
Easy ways to get more fruit and veg in your day General Nutrition, Children, Adolescents, Adults, Older Adults, Sports Nutrition
Simple solutions for using up fruit General Nutrition, Children, Adolescents, Adults, Older Adults
Simple solutions for using up vegetables General Nutrition, Children, Adolescents, Adults, Older Adults
Fruit and vegetable nutrition information National Nutrition Week 2015, General Nutrition, Children, Adolescents, Adults, Older Adults
Fruit and vegetable recipes National Nutrition Week 2015, General Nutrition, Children, Adolescents, Adults, Older Adults
Education tools to promote fruit and vegetables National Nutrition Week 2015, General Nutrition, Children, Adolescents
Fruit and vegetable meal and snack ideas National Nutrition Week 2015, General Nutrition, Children, Adolescents, Adults, Older Adults
Reduce your fruit and vegetable waste National Nutrition Week 2015, General Nutrition, Children, Adolescents, Adults, Older Adults
Kitchen tips for using fruit and veg National Nutrition Week 2015, General Nutrition, Children, Adolescents, Adults, Older Adults
Whats in season National Nutrition Week 2015, General Nutrition, Children, Adolescents, Adults, Older Adults
Growing fruit and vegetables National Nutrition Week 2015, General Nutrition, Children, Adolescents, Adults, Older Adults
Buying fruit and vegetables National Nutrition Week 2015, General Nutrition, Children, Adolescents, Adults, Older Adults
National Nutrition Week 2015 resources National Nutrition Week 2015, General Nutrition, Children, Adolescents, Adults, Older Adults
Water and quitting smoking General Nutrition, Adults, Older Adults
Exercise and quitting smoking General Nutrition, Adults, Older Adults, Physical Activity
Breakfast and quitting smoking General Nutrition, Adults, Older Adults
Weight gain and quitting smoking General Nutrition, Adults, Older Adults
Healthy Eating Pyramid General Nutrition, Children, Adolescents, Adults, Older Adults
Australian Dietary Guidelines: Recommended daily intakes General Nutrition, Children, Adolescents, Adults, Older Adults
Australian Dietary Guidelines: Standard serves General Nutrition, Children, Adolescents, Adults, Older Adults
Nuts in schools General Nutrition, Children
Nuts, health and kids General Nutrition, Children
Breakfast General Nutrition
Fibre General Nutrition
Iron General Nutrition
Australian Dietary Guidelines 2013 General Nutrition, Children, Adolescents, Adults, Older Adults
Vegetable snacks for kids Children
Training toddlers' taste buds Children
Packing a school lunchbox Children
1 2 3 next ›


----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Healthy Eating Pyramid
Nutrition Australia's new Healthy Eating Pyramid is here!

The Healthy Eating Pyramid is a simple visual guide to the types and proportion of foods that we should eat every day for good health.

It contains the five core food groups, plus healthy fats, according to how much they contribute to a balanced diet based on the Australian Dietary Guidelines (2013).

The layers of the Pyramid are based on the recommended food intake for 19–50 year olds according to the Australian Dietary Guidelines (2013). However the proportions and placement of each food group are generally applicable to all age groups from 1–70 years.


The Healthy Eating Pyramid encourages Australians to
enjoy a variety of foods from every food group, every day.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
################################################################
http://medicaleconomics.modernmedicine.com/medical-economics/content/tags/american-heart-association/new-obesity-guidelines-help-physicians-and?page=full


Few health problems pose a greater threat to patients than obesity and its related ailments. Primary care physicians are on the front lines of the battle against obesity. That’s why, experts say, it’s critical for doctors to find ways of instituting health and behavioral modification programs into their practices to help patients make meaningful lifestyle changes.


###################################################

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Obesity_in_Australia

Obesity in Australia is an "epidemic"[2] with "increasing frequency."[2][3] The Medical Journal of Australia found that obesity in Australia more than doubled in the two decades preceding 2003,[4] and the unprecedented rise in obesity has been compared to the same health crisis in America.[4] The rise in obesity has been attributed to poor eating habits in the country closely related to the availability of fast food since the 1970s,[5][6] sedentary lifestyles and a decrease in the labour workforce.[7][8][9]

In a study published in 2015 by the US journal of Economics and Human Biology, obesity is found to have the largest impact on men aged over 75, and women aged between 60-74.[11

Indigenous Australians have Australia's highest level of obesity.[16] A 2001 study showing that 31% of Aborigines and Torres Strait Islanders were obese, nearly double the national average at that time.[16]

The percentage of overweight and obese children in Australia, despite rapid increases in the 1980s and the first half of the 1990s, have remained mostly steady for the past 10 years, with 23 to 24% of Australians under the age of 18 classified as overweight, and 5 to 6% of the same demographic classified as obese.[2]

##########################################################################




Inspirational Poems.

Jan 26, 2016 - 3 comments

" Many times I sought the lighthouse
The familiar beam in the dark
Looking for the comfort
Radiating from its spark;
Today I turn that inward
No longer am I the seeker
I am not just the lighthouse
I am the light -
And lighthouse keeper. "