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Phil Zeltzman, DVM, DACVS  
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Specialties: surgery

Interests: Pet Owner Education
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Behind the scenes at a surgery clinic

Sep 05, 2009 - 8 comments
Tags:

surgery

,

Dog

,

cat

,

acl

,

abdominal surgery

,

Skin tumor removal

,

fractures

,

Luxations

,

dislocations

,

veterinarian

,

Veterinary



Do you know the most common procedures surgeons perform?  I just tried to find the answer.

Who cares? For one, I was just curious.

More importantly though, it could possibly make readers aware of what is truly common, and even better, what could be avoided.  Sometimes, it’s just a matter of information.

Finally, it would give interested readers some insight about what happens inside a surgical practice.

Here are the top 5:

1. ACL surgery

2. Abdominal surgery

3. Skin tumor removal

4. Fractures

5. Luxations (dislocations)

So there you go.  The top 5 are probably fairly representative of most surgery clinics.

Other common surgeries would include laryngeal paralysis, “brachycephalic syndrome” surgery (in dogs with a flat face such as the Bulldog), P/U or perineal urethrostomy in cats who cannot pee, anal sac tumor removal, back surgery for a slipped disc.

The list could go on.

Phil Zeltzman, DVM, DACVS
Pet surgeon and author of a free, weekly newsletter for true pet lovers, available at DrPhilZeltzman.com


Comments
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Avatar universal
by Jaquta, Sep 05, 2009
Interesting!  My GP said 10% of his time was spent removing skin cancers or melanoma's.  It seems like there could be considerable cross over between human and animal (pet).

Avatar universal
by Phil Zeltzman, DVM, DACVSBlank, Sep 05, 2009
It's all relative.

I think I read somewhere that ACL (knee) surgery is 5 times more common in dogs than in people.

Phil Zeltzman, DVM, DACVS
Pet surgeon and author of a free, weekly newsletter for true pet lovers, available at DrPhilZeltzman.com


746512 tn?1388811180
by Tammy2009, Sep 05, 2009
Also remember there is going to be a difference in which type of clinic it is.  Your general vet isn't going to have the same ratios as a full surgery clinic.

And for me, I need to find a surgery clinic because in all the time I've volunteered at clinics, I've never been able to watch any of those surgeries.  The most interesting were the slipping kneecap on a cat (I guess could be grouped under number 5), emergency C-section and a pyometra dog.  

Oh well, :D Keep saving lives Dr. Zeltman.

Avatar universal
by Phil Zeltzman, DVM, DACVSBlank, Sep 06, 2009
You're right Tammy, the numbers would vary at a general practice.

As the title implied, I was strictly talking about a surgery clinic.

Phil Zeltzman, DVM, DACVS
Pet surgeon and author of a free, weekly newsletter for true pet lovers, available at DrPhilZeltzman.com


746512 tn?1388811180
by Tammy2009, Sep 06, 2009
Yea, I noticed that after I responsed, lol

134578 tn?1463413330
by AnnieBrooke, Sep 06, 2009
Regarding knee surgery being more common in dogs than people  -- does this statistic correct for the fact that dogs have four knees and people only have two?  If not, maybe the stat really should be 2 1/2 times more likely rather than 5 times more likely.  LOL

Avatar universal
by Phil Zeltzman, DVM, DACVSBlank, Sep 06, 2009
Well, Annie, with all due respect... dogs (and cats) only have 2 knees...

We'll all the same, really.

We all have 1 shoulders, 1 elbow and 1 wrist in each arm - or front leg in a pet.

And we all have 1 hip, 1 knee and 1 ankle in each leg - or back leg in a pet.

Don't feel alone, it's a common misconception, I hear that from my clients all the time!

I hope this little factoid changes your life!

Phil Zeltzman, DVM, DACVS
Pet surgeon and author of a free, weekly newsletter for true pet lovers, available at DrPhilZeltzman.com


675347 tn?1365464245
by ginger899, Sep 12, 2009
The knee thing was so lol!(forgive my frivolity)...unless you have a pet bee in which case the bees' knees equal 6.
(excuse me but I just have to post this!)

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