Avatar_dr_m
Phil Zeltzman, DVM, DACVS  
Male

Specialties: surgery

Interests: Pet Owner Education
All Journal Entries Journals

Behind the scenes at a surgery clinic

Sep 05, 2009 - 8 comments
Tags:

surgery

,

Dog

,

cat

,

acl

,

abdominal surgery

,

Skin tumor removal

,

fractures

,

Luxations

,

dislocations

,

veterinarian

,

Veterinary



Do you know the most common procedures surgeons perform?  I just tried to find the answer.

Who cares? For one, I was just curious.

More importantly though, it could possibly make readers aware of what is truly common, and even better, what could be avoided.  Sometimes, it’s just a matter of information.

Finally, it would give interested readers some insight about what happens inside a surgical practice.

Here are the top 5:

1. ACL surgery

2. Abdominal surgery

3. Skin tumor removal

4. Fractures

5. Luxations (dislocations)

So there you go.  The top 5 are probably fairly representative of most surgery clinics.

Other common surgeries would include laryngeal paralysis, “brachycephalic syndrome” surgery (in dogs with a flat face such as the Bulldog), P/U or perineal urethrostomy in cats who cannot pee, anal sac tumor removal, back surgery for a slipped disc.

The list could go on.

Phil Zeltzman, DVM, DACVS
Pet surgeon and author of a free, weekly newsletter for true pet lovers, available at DrPhilZeltzman.com


Comments
Post a Comment
Avatar_f_tn
by Jaquta, Sep 05, 2009
Interesting!  My GP said 10% of his time was spent removing skin cancers or melanoma's.  It seems like there could be considerable cross over between human and animal (pet).

Avatar_dr_m_tn
by Phil Zeltzman, DVM, DACVSBlank, Sep 05, 2009
It's all relative.

I think I read somewhere that ACL (knee) surgery is 5 times more common in dogs than in people.

Phil Zeltzman, DVM, DACVS
Pet surgeon and author of a free, weekly newsletter for true pet lovers, available at DrPhilZeltzman.com


746512_tn?1388811180
by Tammy2009, Sep 05, 2009
Also remember there is going to be a difference in which type of clinic it is.  Your general vet isn't going to have the same ratios as a full surgery clinic.

And for me, I need to find a surgery clinic because in all the time I've volunteered at clinics, I've never been able to watch any of those surgeries.  The most interesting were the slipping kneecap on a cat (I guess could be grouped under number 5), emergency C-section and a pyometra dog.  

Oh well, :D Keep saving lives Dr. Zeltman.

Avatar_dr_m_tn
by Phil Zeltzman, DVM, DACVSBlank, Sep 06, 2009
You're right Tammy, the numbers would vary at a general practice.

As the title implied, I was strictly talking about a surgery clinic.

Phil Zeltzman, DVM, DACVS
Pet surgeon and author of a free, weekly newsletter for true pet lovers, available at DrPhilZeltzman.com


746512_tn?1388811180
by Tammy2009, Sep 06, 2009
Yea, I noticed that after I responsed, lol

134578_tn?1404951303
by AnnieBrooke, Sep 06, 2009
Regarding knee surgery being more common in dogs than people  -- does this statistic correct for the fact that dogs have four knees and people only have two?  If not, maybe the stat really should be 2 1/2 times more likely rather than 5 times more likely.  LOL

Avatar_dr_m_tn
by Phil Zeltzman, DVM, DACVSBlank, Sep 06, 2009
Well, Annie, with all due respect... dogs (and cats) only have 2 knees...

We'll all the same, really.

We all have 1 shoulders, 1 elbow and 1 wrist in each arm - or front leg in a pet.

And we all have 1 hip, 1 knee and 1 ankle in each leg - or back leg in a pet.

Don't feel alone, it's a common misconception, I hear that from my clients all the time!

I hope this little factoid changes your life!

Phil Zeltzman, DVM, DACVS
Pet surgeon and author of a free, weekly newsletter for true pet lovers, available at DrPhilZeltzman.com


675347_tn?1365464245
by ginger899, Sep 12, 2009
The knee thing was so lol!(forgive my frivolity)...unless you have a pet bee in which case the bees' knees equal 6.
(excuse me but I just have to post this!)

Post a Comment