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Double/Alternating Hyperphoria

Aug 12, 2008 - 2 comments
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double hyperphoria

,

alternating hyperphoria

,

Eye

,

optometry

,

optometrist

,

vision

,

neurological



When I was younger, my mom finally decided it was convienient enough to get me into an eye doctor once more.  In addition to finding the obvious nearsightedness, they diagnosed me with double hyperphoria (or alternating hyperphoria).  Little was known from this eye doctor who had been an optometrist for 20+ years.  He had read about this in books but never actually had a case.  

Nothing ever got done about it since there is little knowledge about this condition other than it is a neurological issue.  "If it isnt broke, dont fix it" I always say.  Up until recent, I always had sporadic incidents of my double hyperphoria kicking in.  Now it does happen more often, usually provoked by strobe lights (Im a club goer) or when Im driving at night and someone's headlights glare at me from an odd angle.

Today, I felt compelled to join here and seek info.  Why?  Well, my graphic design job has fit me with 2 monitors.  One is a CRT and my primary is a modern flatscreen.  Since the addition of the secondary CRT monitor, I find my double hyperphoria "getting confused" if I am needing to look at both screens during the same instant.  I suppose the only cure is to not do that.

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by Duane01, Sep 04, 2008
(9-4-08)
Hello:

One month ago, I went to a new optometrist. At age 58, after wearing glasses for nearsightedness and astigmatism (including bifocals in recent years), I was diagnosed with Hyperphoria in my left eye, in which my left eye looks slightly higher than my dominant right -- plus, my left drifts a little to the side (exo- or esophoria??). It finally explains a lot of goofy physical symptoms that I could never resolve over the years -- tight, sore neck, shoulders, back as my body tried to automatically adjust my vision.

I received a new lens prescription that include prisms to correct my left eye vision. I found that, unlike the "normal" problems (nearsightedness, etc.) which are easily corrected, Hyperphoria corrections take some experimentation. I'm waiting for a stronger correction to arrive. The prisms have relieved some of the muscle tightness, and I can tell that my heart is more relaxed.

I, too, use computers much of the day (credit union marketing), and I realize my symptoms are worse the more closeup work I do. Surgery is not an option -- cut me in other areas, but not neare the eye!

I think I inherited a tendency toward this problem -- my too younger sisters have similar problems -- but I also think it was exacerbated by a ski accident in 1979, when I broke a cervical vertebrae landing on my head.

Best of luck!

Duane Otremba
St. Cloud MN
***@****

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by MWatson1982, Sep 04, 2008
Duane01

Yeah.  When I went to the eye doctor that long time ago, they did report that they had tried prisms on another subject.  Unfortunately she now has double vision for the rest of her life.

Sadly, mine is in both eyes.  They basically are independent from one another in movement.   Looking into more about LASIK, it seems that it migth be too risky anyway.  Id be willing to do contacts because that is reversable (I can just take them out).  





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