All Journal Entries Journals
Previous | Next

Human Immunodeficiency Virus unintentionally cured by stem cell transplant

Dec 30, 2010 - 0 comments
Tags:

Human Immunodeficiency Virus

,

HIV

,

Cure

,

stem cell

,

transplant

,

fox news

,

CD4 receptor

,

white blood cells

,

gene

,

Berlin

,

virus

,

Germany

,

“Berlin patient

,

,

Timothy Ray Brown

,

leukemia



A Human Immunodeficiency Virus optimistic man in Germany received a transplant of stem cells, which had the wonderful side effect of totally healing his HIV. That said, there is a serious hitch. It demands a transplant from people with a very particular, and very rare, gene. There is nevertheless no full blown heal, and this treatment isn't feasible to use yet. A large ample paydayloans could possibly pay for research for more cures.



Man healed of Human Immunodeficiency Virus utilizing stem cell transplant



A stem cell transplant was what an American man living in Berlin got. Popular Science reports that he was healed of Human Immunodeficiency Virus through this. In 2007, the “Berlin patient,” or Timothy Ray Brown, got the stem cell transplant. Healing his leukemia was the real purpose of it. The traces of HIV have disappeared entirely, as was discovered by monitoring him after the transplant. Of course, it is tough to find the stem cells that can work considering only certain people can help.



Type of cells extremely uncommon



A very specific gene is needed within the person who can have the needed stem cells. The gene being looked for has a component of white blood cells called CD4 receptor. It will lack the CCR5 receptor with this gene. One of the primary targets of Human Immunodeficiency Virus is the CCR5 receptor. Human Immunodeficiency Virus is what Human Immunodeficiency Virus stands for. Having the CCR5 receptor missing means that Human Immunodeficiency Virus cannot infiltrate white blood cells. The person is immune to HIV, more or less. The hitch, of course, is also that only 1 percent of only Western and Northern European males are known to carry the gene, based on Fox News.



Extremely hard to heal



It might seem like a miracle treatment. It is not even close to being accessible though. The stem cell transplant was done to heal Brown's leukemia, which it did, but he had to endure years of painful treatments and immune system suppressing drugs to make sure his body did not reject the transplanted stem cells. There are not very several donors. Even so, the exact right donor has to be matched to you. More than just pain comes from the treatment. It's expensive and experimental as well.



Details from



Popular Science

popsci.com/science/article/2010-12/german-doctors-think-theyve-accidentally-cured-patients-hiv-stem-cell-transplant



Fox News

foxnews.com/health/2010/12/14/doctors-claim-hiv-positive-man-cured-stem-cell-transplant/





Post a Comment