Oh boy-PAIN Journals

well poohhhhhh again!

Mar 23, 2011 - 0 comments
Tags:

Pain

,

Liver

,

Cyst

,

abdominal

,

gallbladder



I thought I was getting some answers until I got my MRCP (another form of an MRI but more technical for abd. pain. Now I'm even more uncertain and more worried now. Does anyone have any ideas as to what this means? Thanks!


FINDINGS:The Extrahepatic bile ducts are mildly dilated for the patients age,

with the common hepatic duct messuring up tp 9mm on a series 10 image 9.

There is also mild prominence of the central intrahepatic duct. No intraductal

filling defects are seen. The pancreatic  duct is nondilated and pancreatic duct is

nondilated and the pancreatic  ductal anatomy appears classic. There is a

duodenal diverticulum seen just anterior to the to the distal common bile duct

adjacent to the pancreatic head. The gallbladder is normal in appearance with no

gallbladder stones seen.

In the inferior right hepatic lobe is am 8mm T2 hyperintense lesion which is not

fully characterized best seen on the M.R.C.P. images, tiny foci of markedly

bright T2 signal likely representing hepatic cysts seen in the liver dome,laeral

left hepatic lobe,and in the more inferior left hepatic lobe. These measure 3 to 4

mm in diameter. No focal pancreatic lesions are seen on this noncontrast study.

The spleen, adrenal glands, and kidneys are normal. There is a rectus diastasis

and evidence of a prior midline surgical incision with probable mesh repair, not

fully imaged.

IMPRESSION:
1) Mild biliary ductal of unclear etiology. No evidence of choledocholithiasis or

cholecystics. Suggest correlation with liver function studies.
2) Duodenal  diverticulum seen just anterior to the to the distal common bile duct

adjacent to the pancreatic head.
3) nonspecific T2 hyperintense lesion in the inferior right hepatic lobe. The

absence of any history of malignancy. this is likely to represent a hemangioma.

Several tiny hepatic cysts are incidentlly noted.
4) Rectus diastasis  with the probable prior  mesh repair of the anterior

abdominal wall.

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