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Bumbs on pubes?

So Um.. I'm 14 anf a few months now I've noticed these pimples/bums/boils? Down there and they either contain puss, blood, the green stuff that honestly feels like some sort of vegitation or a mixture of three. I've been to the doctor twice, the second time I went (last Monday 4/7/11) I told the doctor about these smaller bumbs between my thighs but was too embarassed to tell her about them pimples. They are either inside, by the mouth of the vagina or on the skin. I know embarrasment wont help but it's something I just couldn't say. I've never had sex so it can't be an STI, my mum doesn't have the same problem so it can't be inherited. Yes I'mnot the healthiest person, I am a tad overweight but could that be it? My period started when I was 13 but I still don't know the exact date for it, it comes on different dates every months and lasts about 3-4 days but what's worrying me is this white discharge from my vagina (I think). It's pure white. I'm black so I can't "be red" down there. My mu and my sister are the only ones who know (and my doctor obviously) help me. Please, I'm scared
5 Responses
1166723 tn?1310233484
hello hun, i have a couple questions first so i can understand a little better, do you happen to shave your area? even just your bikini line? you also mentioned that you have some white discharge,are you itchy at all inside or out?how are the bumps on your thighs? and last. do the bumps just come at randome or have you noticed a pattern at all??  hope to hear from you soon! :)
Avatar universal
Hi,
No I don't shave down, I keep it clean, either bath or shower everyday. I  think I've shaved once or twice but I trim the hair when I'm expecting my period because it gets a little messy down there but I never cut the roots, if you understand what I'm trying to say. As for the discharge it doesn't itch on its own but the skin around it can be itchy at times. The bumps appear to come and go as they please but sometimes they are really painful. Thanks for taking time to try and help :)
1166723 tn?1310233484
np im not quite sure what it could be, i thought it could have been a yeast ifection but it doesnt sound like you have one, ive had them many of times!!! but you could always go to the store and pick up a canesoral tablet and rule it out just in case! i would suggest going to a dr again see a female one sometimes its more comfortable w. a femaale then a male. im 22 and i still dont feel comfy talking to male drs about my womanly problems, main reason is that they dont have a vagina so they dont really understand some of the things we go through! take your mum along or sister and dont be shy! just ask away! the little bumps could be ingrown hairs also, i get them sometimes when i trim my area also. but try not to pop em! because it could lead to infections ick! best of luck. sorry i wasnt much help but keep me posted! :)
Avatar universal
Can virgins get yeast infections?
1738343 tn?1310729057
what is hidradenitis suppurativa?



Hidradenitis Suppurativa (HS), also known as 'Acne Inversa', is a physically, psychologically, and socially disabling disease affecting inverse areas of the body (those places where there is skin-to-skin contact - armpits, groin, breasts, etc.), and where apocrine glands and hair follicles are found. It is non-contagious and recurrent; typically manifesting as a progression from single boil-like, pus-filled abscesses, or hard sebaceous lumps, to painful, deep-seated, often inflamed clusters of lesions with chronic seepage (suppuration --- hence the name) involving significant scarring.

Abscesses may be as large as baseballs in some people, are extremely painful to the touch and may persist for years with occasional to frequent periods of inflammation, culminating in drainage, often leaving open wounds that will not heal. These "flare-ups" are often triggered by stress, hormonal changes, or humid heat. Drainage of the lumps provides some relief from severe, often debilitating, pressure pain; however, pain occurs 24 hours a day, 7 days a week for HS sufferers during flare-ups, and is difficult to manage.

Persistent lesions may lead to the formation of sinus tracts, or tunnels connecting the abscesses under the skin. At this stage, complete healing is usually not possible, and progression of the disease in the area is inevitable. Occurrences of bacterial infections and cellulites (deep tissue inflammation) are likely at these sites.

Because of the drainage which may have a foul odor, fever and fatigue caused by acute inflammation and the physical restrictions caused by pain and skin deformation, people often cannot work, drive, exercise or even perform day-to-day tasks, and are ashamed to go out in public. HS sufferers may go through severe bouts of depression, avoid public and inter-personal contact, become sedentary and often overweight.

HS typically goes undiagnosed for years because patients are ashamed to speak with anyone. When they do see a doctor, the disease is frequently misdiagnosed. Only relatively few physicians are able to recognize it and even when they do, suggested treatments are often ineffective, temporary and sometimes even harmful. There is no known cure nor any consistently effective treatment; what works for one person may not work for another. In advanced, chronic cases, surgery is often the choice, but recurrences of HS are not uncommon.

The mechanisms of the disease are described in this article.

Historically, HS has been considered a rare disorder, because it is difficult to accurately estimate the number of HS victims; they conceal their condition, even from friends and close relatives. Estimates, however, indicate at least 1 million - potentially up to 12 million - Hidradenitis Suppurativa sufferers in the United States alone!

What's in a name...

HS was first described in 1839 and has since been called many names. We still cannot agree on what to call it. Germans prefer Akne Inversa, the French still like to use Verneuil's, which we'll admit, sounds much better than Hidradenitis Suppurativa ('oozing inflamed sweat glands').  All are equally correct and equally wrong.  All but names for symptoms of an underlying disease we don't yet know.

..."correct" names for this disease:


Hidradenitis Suppurativa (HS)
   alt:  Hidradenitis Supportiva
Acne Inversa (AI)
Apocrine Acne
Acne conglobata
Apocrinitis
Verneuil's disease
Velpeau's disease
Fox-den disease
Pyodermia sinifica fistulans

Internationally:

Hidrosadénite Suppurée (fr)
Hidrosadenite Supurativa  (es)
Idrosadenite suppurativa (it)
Maladie de Verneuil (fr)
Doença de Verneuil (pt)
Akne Inversa (de)
гнойного гидраденита (ru)



...has been diagnosed as, but is not:
Folliculitis
Acne
Boils
Cysts (sebaceous, inclusion and subcutaneous)
Furuncles
Carbuncles
Poor Hygiene

...is definitely not:
contagious
Herpes
STD
Cancer
Allergies
Plague


...often happens in conjunction with:
PCOS / Insulin Resistance / Androgen Dysfunction
Crohns and other inflammatory auto-immune conditions
Anemia
Hyperhydrosis / hyperhidrosis
Depression
Acne Vulgaris / Cystic / Conglobata
Pilonidal cysts
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