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7474434 tn?1391190508

**Please: Suboxone Withdrawl Sleep Question **

Sup *******,

I came on here about a month ago and asked for help with my suboxone withdrawals and got a lot of mental help from the responses. My friend digger has been helping me with encouraging messages. So I guess that's why im back here. I was on Suboxone 4-16 mg a day for the past 3 years. On January 17th I decided I was done and didn't want an orange pill/strip to run my life day after day. I went into a 6 day out patient detox that treated me with methadone.(not sure if I can count those 6 days towards my sobriety due to the fact methadone temporarily replaced the suboxone. And I firmly believe it just prolonged the detox) But non the less I haven't touched Subs since the 17th. I simply cannot describe, in any words, the withdrawal process. It was a horror show I wouldn't put my worst enemy through that literally brought me to my knees.
  I don't mean to drag this on longer than it has to be. The physical withdrawal symptoms now are very minimal, if not, non existent. Now my biggest problem is this insomnia that ive had the past month. Im the type of addict that can go through withdrawals, but the sleep deprivation will be my motivation for a relapse. Ive been able to keep my mind at bay (somehow) for the past month. But I really need to know what I can do to sleep.
  I have slept maybe 30 hours total the past 30 days. Yes that equals out to an hour a day, but in reality its more like 3 days with no sleep and 2 hours of sleep the 4th day and then the cycle repeats. I don't understand how my body hasn't shut down for 8-10 hours. My eyes feel like they weigh 1,000 pounds, yet they will not shut. I have black/blue/yellow colored bags under both my eyes and it looks horrible. I always feel so cold. My mind and my eyes are not in sync anymore. (I will quickly look at the clock and it feels like my brain doesn't register until a second later) I am seeing black dots in the shower everytime. I feel like I get 10 minute fevers. Restless Leg Syndrom in bed (while attempting to sleep) is the biggest killer ever. AFTER 30 DAYS WITH NO SUBOXONE I STILL CANNOT FALL ASLEEP. The majority of nights it looks like im riding a bicycle in my bed. (crazy I know). I just overall feel like a zombie. I cant do anything anymore... I dread having to get up to go to the bathroom due to the lack of energy I have. Im litteraly running on zero, STUNNED at how im not walking into walls or passing out while walking. I have never been so uncomfortable in my own body (and I am well aware its my brain adapting). My doctor has prescribed me trazadone which has not helped one bit. (even taking 4x the prescribed amount) Ive taken 300MG of diephenhydramine (which is unheard of) and it just makes my eyes attempt to shut, but my brain is going 1,000 miles an hour. I am eating 4x as much as I normally due (common in sleep deprivation). I am verrryy close to getting Xanax to just knock myself out... anything to make the impossible catch up on the much needed sleep. I want my normal sleep pattern back. Please I need to hear a success story with a timeline of a returned sleep pattern. I feel like I came so far after feeling so hopeless. 30 days is a miracle in itself, but having to stay awake EVERYDAY through this is just pure insanity/torture. My days feel 5x as long as they once were, and that's just icing on the cake after making what I thought was the  best decision of my life. (to get off subs) It just feels like its not going to come (even though I know it will) Opiates and Benzos look very attractive right now just to stop this madness and be able to sleep for more than an hour or 2 after days of being up and alone while all my loved ones sleep great knowing im doing the right thing.... I am trying to stop the sugar before bed...Just please don't tell me to try melatonin... I weigh 150 pounds and will take fckn 10 of those things and wont feel a thing. Im dieing for any hope so please shine a light in this dark place im making the biggest effort to get out of. thank you for reading..
7 Responses
4113881 tn?1415850276
Wassup man....Im going to copy and paste all the tricks I know and you can cipher through them. Dont worry...I wont post Melatonin :) Remember...talk to your doc before starting a new supplement if your already on meds or have an underlying medical condition. I liked the Kava in tea form myself.

The herb Valerian root (Valeriana officinalis) is used as a sedative on the nervous system and a relaxant for the muscles (Reader's Digest, 2009, Pp128). It also helps with headaches, which can sometimes be a result of an anxiety attack. According to Mosby's the recommended dosage of Valerian extract is 400-900mg, before bedtime (2010, Pp592). It is recommended that Valerian not take with MAOIs.

The herb Lemon Balm (Melissa officinalis L.) is used as a sedative and it has mood-enhancing abilities(Reader's Digest, 2009, Pp73). The leaves are the part of the plant that is used and can come in an extract. According to Mosby's the recommended dosage is 80mg of Lemon Balm extract combinewith120mg Valerian root extract, tid (three times a day) (2010, Pp390).

The herb Kava (Piper methysticum) has a sedative and it is an anxiolytic (Skidmore-Roth, 2010, Pp.369). Anxiolytic is defined, by the Mirriam-Webster's Medical Dictionary, as a drug that relieves anxiety. It acts directly on the limbic system, which is the parts of the brain that are concerned with emotion and motivation. According to Mosby's the recommended dosage of Kava extract is 45-70mg tid (2010, Pp370). Take it with a meal for increased absorption. It is also recommended that it not be given to children under 12 (Skidmore-Roth, 2010, Pp370).

The mineral Magnesium works as a muscle relaxant, which can be helpful to someone suffering from anxiety issues. The stress of anxiety can take it's toll on the shoulder muscles and the neck muscles. According to the Encyclopedia of Nutritional Supplements the recommended daily intake of Magnesium is 280mg (Murray, 1996, Pp161).

Although all of the B vitamins can aid in the calming of anxiety issues, vitamin B6 (Pyridoxine) seems to be the most important because it helps to form chemical transmitters in the nervous system (Murray, 1996, Pp100). According to the Encyclopedia of Nutritional Supplements the recommended daily intake of vitamin B6 is 2mg (Murray, 1996, Pp101
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Getting Some Sleep During Opiate Withdrawal

Natural Remedy's -
There are also other alternatives to sleep aid medications that can help during opiate withdrawal. One thing that works well for a lot of people is the use of hot baths, hot tubs, and trips to the sauna. These methods help relax the body and can be great for dealing with the chills and aches/pains. Exercising is another option but is something that can be quite difficult to do when going through withdrawals. When one exercises, their body releases endorphins just like how our bodies do when we use our drug of choice. Not only is exercise healthy for you, it will also often leave you feeling tired at the end of the day. Some decaffeinated tea, warm milk, or hot coco before bed can be soothing for some as well and is great for helping with the chills. Coffee isn't a bad idea during the day to get you up and going while withdrawing but should be avoided close to bedtime. The great thing about these methods are that they are not addicting or habit forming.

There are also several relaxation techniques that can be beneficial as well. When I first heard of these, I thought they were just a bunch of B.S. but must admit they did actually help a little after finally giving them a chance. Relaxation techniques include breathing exercises, mediating, and listening to those audio tapes that play peaceful sounds or music. Lets face it, when you're withdrawing you're basically willing to try anything to help yourself get through those rough times. I also find creating and sticking to a going to sleep and waking up schedule helps a lot to with sleep. What I mean by this is to not have nights were you're up until 3 A.M. and wake up the next day at 11 A.M. then following the previous day by going to bed early and waking up early. Make a schedule and stick to it.

A breathing exercise that I have found to help with not only getting to sleep but relaxing works by lowering your pulse and clearing your mind. For some people, this works well while others may not notice much of a difference. It takes a little practice to get used to as well. It can also help when you have a panic attack or are frustrated. This breathing exercise is called the 4-7-4 technique and works as follows:


    Sit down in a chair with your back straight and hands together meeting at your stomach.
    Your fingers should interlock at your stomach with the backside (opposite of your palm side) of your hands facing out.
    Inhale and take a 4 second continuous breath of fresh air and hold it in for 7 seconds.
    After holding your breath for 7 seconds, release your breath for 4 seconds continuously
    Continue this 3-5 times


Another thing that may help is simply reading a book, surfing the web, or watching a little television before bed. It will help keep your mind busy while giving you some entertainment to pass the time and relax. However, don't just sit there for a few hours watching television, surfing the web, or playing video games as this can have the opposite effect. Try doing something that you really enjoy that doesn't take up a lot of your energy. Having a good environment around you before you go to sleep can make quite the difference so make sure you're in a relaxed, quiet, and comfortable environment each night.

Herbal Methods -
There are also some natural herbs out there that are said to help with sleep. While I have never tried any of these herbs, the ones I most commonly hear about are Valerian Root and St. John’s Wort, which can usually be found at stores like GNC or Vitamin World. There are other herbal remedy's out there as well. I have also heard Lavender can help. Don't look at these herbs as something you shouldn't talk to your doctor about as some of them carry side effects or can have adverse effects with other medications. As always, be smart and talk with your doctor!


Avatar universal
Hey Envy, nice to see you posting my friend!

I don't have anything to add to the brilliant post from ABN, truly amazing!

Keep going buddy, I do feel your pain, it feckin *****! As you know my sleep has been terrible but I get enough to get by and to feel able to manage my days effectively. But so much of my troubles with sleep comes from over extended use of benzo's alongside opiates, so please try hard not to go down that route. You will bounce back, truly you will. Stay strong and know I am proud of you! Hope to speak soon, let me know how you're doing. Keep it up, you'll start to see the changes soon enough, I promise you!
5786666 tn?1374494531
Envy- I know it is hard to even think about it, but I think you should try to get some exercise. Just get up and walk around the block or something... tiring out muscles releases hormones in your body that make you sleep so they can regenerate. Don't think about it or procrastinate... just go!!! I know you are UBER tired and don't feel like doing crap... make yourself get up. GO NOW!!!! I seriously believe this will help... it did for me with opies w/d and insomnia. As an additional bonus, you will get some well-needed fresh air and vitamin D! Good luck!
7474434 tn?1391190508
Well I still feel like a zombie + 10 other sleep deprivation side effects.
But I have AMBIEN now... lets see if 15 mg will put me out.
Avatar universal
It is SO discouraging to hear kosxenvy sleep issues still after being off sub for so long. Ihave been going thru HELL for 13 days and last night asked God To take me in my sleep. Obviously he did not answer my prayers...Im still here. I have been in bed for 2 weeks now. I feel likeI can hardly even raise my hand. Sleep for an hour then wake up and its the WORST. I was on sub for 2 and 1/2 years andwent off cold turkey at 2mg. I think if there were light at the end of the tunnel I could take it better. But when I hear that someone still after 30 days is still having all the same symptoms OMG
Avatar universal
To elatedxadict13 I know you are right on about the exercise. When you can barely walk down the hall its difficult to think about going outside but I know you are right. Just do it!!!
Avatar universal
I have 5 months off of suboxone and the first month was hell because of lack of sleep by month 2 it seemed to get better my doctor told me to keep my room dark only go to sleep at night don't stay in your bed room all day don't watch tv in your room no naps I tried a Xanax and all it did was let me sleep 30 mins and when I got up I felt like I hadn't slept even a second I felt like a zombie and it lasted days after I took a Xanax b the time I had a month off suboxone I decided I need help I need to talk to some one who has been through what iv been through I need support I got a counselor and hit an na meeting and it helps to have support of others who have gone through the same thing and be abel to relate as well as get into functions they have . you may want to go to a sleep clinic have your doctor get you a referral to go to a sleep clinic because you could have a sleeping disorder you never knew you had . because when you were on suboxone you didn't feel the the lack of sleep it could have been laying dormant . the sleep clinic helped my I am also going to a pain clinic . so far so good
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