Aa
Aa
A
A
A
Close
Avatar universal

28 days off vic's-thanks to everyone here...

after a 5+ year daily habit of 30-50mgs of vicodin i decided 28 days ago that enough was enough. (no med issue, just loved the buzz...) i found this site 27 days ago & have used everyone's stories here to push through, especially those first few brutal days...i feel like i should thank you all by name, because each of you played a role. at this point, these stories are my "aftercare" & i continue to find strength here everyday. i feel good-i'm healthier physically & mentally than i've been in a long time-again, thanks to your tips, testimonials & lessons i feel confidant going forward :) ....in my situation, i still have acccess to the pills, nothing can really change that, but i've made my intentions known to everyone who might offer to "help me out" with a few. i am done. if successfully recovering alcoholics can walk past liquor stores & bars, if they can have dinner w/ friends at a restuarant full of people drinking & if they can sit & watch TV while getting pummelled by smiling folks in beer ads, then i can be around my demon w/o giving in to him (them!) as well. so far so good, one day at a time & thank you all so, so much....it really DOES get better everyday! off to gym...:)
15 Responses
Sort by: Helpful Oldest Newest
Avatar universal
Good Morning and Congratulations on 28 days free of pills - that is a great accomplishment and you have alot to be proud of!

I have no doubt that your strong mental attitude will help you to steer clear of the vicodin in the future.  Other types of aftercare are a good idea as well  -  NA or one on one counseling are a good start.  Just a thought.  

I'm glad you posted your success story and Well Wishes to you....

Sandy ♦
Helpful - 0
Avatar universal
I am so glad you mentioned being around them, but still staying sober.  Good analogy on alcoholics.  There are many on here who think that you will fail automatically if you are around your drug of choice.  I am around them in my profession and cannot and will not quit my job.  So, I refuse to believe that it can't be done.

Thank you.
Helpful - 0
495284 tn?1333894042
COMMUNITY LEADER
Congrats on 28 days!  May you continue to walk the life of recovery~
Helpful - 0
2083449 tn?1381354708
Congrats on your 28 days clean! Stay strong and keep moving forward! You need to make sure that YOU stay in control! I agree that we can never eliminate all access! But, I would do everything you can to stay as far away as possible! It should like you have a great attitude and you know where you are going! Take care, and I wish you all the best!
Helpful - 0
1970885 tn?1435860428
Congrats. You've been through hell and have come out on the other side - something to be proud of.
You are at the point in your recovery where the detox is still fresh in your memory - you are certain of your path and it is clear and uncluttered. You are determined.
So just a word of caution - you wrote that you use our stories as a form of after care - I do too, but I also go to NA meetings. You didn't mention AA or NA; you're probably in the process of lining up meetings.  If not, you should be. Having access to pills is dangerous, no matter how much clean time you have. It sounds like you've done everything you can to cut those ties. You need to be honest with yourself about how you feel about the pill situation. Your mind will start whispering to you "one won't hurt".  The longer you're clean, the more likely you'll be to believe that one won't hurt. It's a struggle that never ends. Having easy access to pills makes long term recovery tough.
Finally, I'm an alcoholic - haven't drank for 27 years, but 15 years ago I found pills. The reason why boozers go to AA meetings is because they ARE surrounded by beer, wine, etc. The reason why the sober ones stay sober is because they fight the craving, the whispering voice, every day. Just like those of us addicted to meds. Everyday.

Helpful - 0
1970885 tn?1435860428
I don't think that those of us who caution others about being around or having easy access to meds feel that failure is automatic. It's just that most addicts, the majority (myself included) have found that relapse occurs if we can get our hands on pills, and if we haven't put after care, etc., in place.
You are an inspiration because you offer hope to those who may not be able to remove themselves from exposure to meds.
I'm very happy to see you posting again. You help me try to stay balanced.
Helpful - 0
1331115 tn?1536362140
Hey pg66 a big CONGRATS on 28 days clean. Now it is time to seek some sort of aftercare as it is the key to staying sober. There are all types of aftercare so just pick the methods that will make you successful. I know without aftercare I would not have made it 2+ years clean as it teaches us the tools we need to live a sober life. So Keep on Keepin on as I love to hear uccess stories such as yours. God Bless---Rick
Helpful - 0
Avatar universal
I still check in daily and only post when I think I can offer advice, which isn't often. Lol. I'm a tough one to crack, Kyle, as I'm sure you can gather. Lol. It can be a bad thing sometimes, but it's also going to keep me sober. The more someone tells me I CAN'T do something, the harder I'm going to work to prove them wrong. I understand your point of view whole heartedly, but people also need a different opinion sometimes. That's what makes this world grand. The world is also scary, but you can't live under a rock. You can't suddenly "unmemorize" numbers, never visit sick relatives/friends who may have pills and you can't always quit a career. Granted. It's solid advice to advise us to stay away from pills/dealers, but the "almost always fail" part could be left off.

Nothing personal. Just different opinions. :) I wish him well.
Helpful - 0
1970885 tn?1435860428
I agree with you; I've been trying to re phrase the "most always" to something that is still honest but less negative. Fortunately I'm just an addict - I don't have ego problems to boot, so I was able to see the merit in what you were saying.
And I also had to accept the fact that not everyone is like me relative to recovery. Its just that I have done this for too many years, and when I read posts from someone new to recovery who mentions not needing after care, or keeping pills in the house to prove that they are stronger than the meds, well I want to reach through the computer screen and shake them.
Thanks again.
Helpful - 0
Avatar universal
You've helped many people. I commend you.
Helpful - 0
1331115 tn?1536362140
Kyle/Shelly You are both correct there is no one size fits all here. Each person crying out for help for a problem needs  to be dealt with in a way that will help them. Everyone is different and to that end any advice given should be given as to what the person has posted.  
Helpful - 0
1801781 tn?1461629469
Big congrats on doing one of the hardest things there is to do .  Keep it up...and as others have said...keep your guard up!
Helpful - 0
Avatar universal
thanks to everyone for their thoughts! each & everyone of you has something i/we can use going forward in this "one-day-at-at-time" journey....whether it's someone on day 2 reminding me/us how awful it was, or someone who's been down the road already, seen the potholes & roadblocks, & made it through to where they are today. yes- proper aftercare, keep my/our guard up, watch out for triggers, etc...you guys are the best. much respect to all of you!  
Helpful - 0
1855076 tn?1337115303
Nice post.  AA/NA works when people work the program.  But it isn't for everyone.  My ex had 5 years sober with AA but when he got complacent and started skipping meetings, he eventually relapsed and had 12 years of hell (and put his family through it as well.)  My uncle was nearly dead from alcohol.  Back then, they gave you a lot of pills to get through that and he wound up addicted to them.  He is over 50 years sober from both and is still involved in AA.  His wife continued to drink through those years and he never relapsed and credits AA to his success.

Years ago I tried AlAnon to help cope with my ex-husband's alcoholism but found it really wasn't for me.  At least the meetings.  But I did use some of the strategies I learned there and even now, all these years later, I still use a lot of the 12-step stuff to help me.

You sound committed and determined and hitting the gym helps on many levels.  Keep up what you're doing and if you feel you ever need it, AA/NA is always there.  Or other aftercare.  This is a great forum and this and the pain management forum helped me get off narcotics.  I never abused them but was on such high doses of so many meds for pain I was afraid at some point I'd go from dependence to addiction.  After researching and reading other people's stories, I realized, for me personally, I'd rather manage my pain in other ways.  I agree with you that everyone has something to offer and everyone's path is slightly different.  All the best.
Helpful - 0
Avatar universal
Reading your post gives me hope, bc at the moment it's a dark gloomy place. Congraulations and thanks for sharing.
Helpful - 0
Have an Answer?

You are reading content posted in the Addiction: Substance Abuse Community

Top Addiction Answerers
495284 tn?1333894042
City of Dominatrix, MN
Avatar universal
phoenix, AZ
Learn About Top Answerers
Didn't find the answer you were looking for?
Ask a question
Popular Resources
Is treating glaucoma with marijuana all hype, or can hemp actually help?
If you think marijuana has no ill effects on your health, this article from Missouri Medicine may make you think again.
Julia Aharonov, DO, reveals the quickest way to beat drug withdrawal.
Tricks to help you quit for good.
Herpes sores blister, then burst, scab and heal.
Herpes spreads by oral, vaginal and anal sex.