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Avatar universal

Question about Pain Management

I've been giving this a lot of thought.  Because opiate withdrawal is not life threatening, doctors are handing these things out like candy.  Yes, you get that little pamphlet advising you that these drugs can be addictive.  The truth is that these drugs were never intended for long term use.  I think it would only take a few minutes out of a doctors time to show you a short video of what these drugs can do over prolong use.........addiction and dependence is a very fine line and showing a short video of what one will suffer as a result of prolonged use (watching someone suffer withdrawal) as a possibility may make the patient make alternative choices.

There is no reason that I can see for doctors to be prescribing medications that at one time were strictly for patients on their death beds.........virtually nobody reads those pamphlets anyway, so where does the responsibility lie?.......If you are informed correctly, then your doctor can accept no blame.

Nauty
56 Responses
666151 tn?1311117976
MEDICAL PROFESSIONAL
I have argued that there should be a separate residency in 'opiate prescribing'.  There is no doubt that most doctors do not understand or appreciate the risks of these medications, for the individual and for society.  It will never happen-- but given the huge number of deaths that occur annually from these drugs (most people would be shocked to see the number of young people who die just in their own communities each year), there should be greater attention to the risks from each prescription.
Avatar universal
I have to disagree there(although i agree dr's should warn patients more, but that applies to lots of things, not just narcotics).
there's no need to scare people. many people suffer needlessly because they fear an addiction which may never happen.
if someone is in so much pain that they are seriously considering suicide, does that count as 'death-bed' ?
I read ALL the info that comes with the drugs, as well as chking the net for further advice.
the responsibility lies with the patient. take the meds as prescribed. if you can't then you need to tell your dr about it. then he can help you.
If it weren't for strong painkillers, I'd have been dead in my mid-20's.
not much more to say.
hope you don't think i'm being nasty. i'm not.
i just need them to survive, that's all.
take care Nauty

Nick
Avatar universal
Naughty,
I agree with you, I think a short vieo when signing your pain management contract would be a excellent idea. When I was first out on pain meds eight years ago, nobody ever told me about w/'ds You knew about dependance and addiction fro the media, but never kew it included the drug I was prescribed.
Take Care Naughty
-Dez
Avatar universal
Nick,

thats all i am asking for is informing the patient a little better.  I certainly think a good scare would save many from future addiction/dependence.  I knew nothing about addiction or withdrawal, therefore I got trapped in the cycle of addiction completely blind...I mean clueless........

I have read some posts on here that in some states Doc's don't prescribe narc's at all?..dunno if that's true or not, but i've read it.

Pain management in my opinion was specifically created for the purpose of keeping the DEA away.......

I'm am just thinking about back in the 80's.....you couldn't get vicodin to save your life?........so, what happened between then and now?  Illicit drugs were on the streets at those times...not saying they aren't now, but prescription drug use is now the drug of choice on the streets more so than
Avatar universal
I think you all make excellent points and there are good arguments on both sides. I would agree that there should be more extensive education on prescribing of all controlled drugs. Especially since doctors are not the only ones who have prescription priviledges anymore---it should be a larger part of the nursing practicioner and physican asst programs and being in the field, I can tell you that its not.    
356518 tn?1322267242
Chronic pain is a disease just like any of the other diseases and to single it out and call it a hiding place from the DEA just because of an addiction problem is unfair to the many who suffer from CP and the other numerous disease's that cause chronic pain.
The DEA monitors pain management just like they do any other doctors and their practices, even more so than the others.
I am not implying that addiction problems with these medications are not a problem, they are but to put the addicted and the CP Pt's together in one group isn't fair at all. When a CP Pt goes to the doctor for pain control and are prescibed medications then they are no different than the person with diabetes going to the doctor for their insulin.
Opioids and narcotic medications were certainly prescibed and abused too in the 80's you just did not hear much about the abuse. Today their are children experimenting with prescription medications and those who buy/sell them and that's why there is so much negative press today about these medications. Back in the 80's this was uncommon to hear.
Nurse practitioners and physician assistants are NOT allowed by the DEA or medical board to write these kinds of prescriptions.
Addiction and being dependant on medications are two COMPLETLY different things all together. A person who has to take these type of prescription drugs are dependant on them to have a life and function with a lesser degree of pain and that's not addiction.
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