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Does mold increase other allergies? What do we do? urgent

I had anaphylactic shock for the first time the other week and it happened again a week later. The first time is was from a clay mask and the second time, I think it was from dust. My partner has also had anaphylactic shock for the first time on Monday and again yesterday and today from eating and then driving back to work through an area with a lot of trees. We have gone through four epipens in three weeks...

We have never had allergies so severe. She has food allergies that cause cystic acne, and I have seasonal allergies and the occasional skin sensitivity. The week after my attacks, we found a pot full of molded food above our refrigerator. All of our plants had died, and I believe it was from the mold. We have since cleaned the kitchen up, but have not done a good deep clean yet, or cleaned out the refrigerator.

Why is this happening?? We are at a loss and don't know what to do. I'm in the process of getting an appointment with an allergist and she doesn't have insurance so she's in the process of getting to a clinic. Are these allergies going to stick around or will they go away if we get all the unseen spores cleaned up? How is the mold causing our bodies to be so reactive to other things?
2 Responses
15695260 tn?1549596713
Hello and welcome to the forum.  If you and your partner are having anaphylactic shock, my suggestion is to have both of you see an allergist for testing.  That can be life threatening and you need to know the source. Mold can clearly make you ill but to this extent, the involvement seems somewhat unlikely.  But in general, it can make you ill. https://www.webmd.com/women/mold-mildew#1
207091 tn?1337713093
You can buy a home test kit for mold at a hardware store starting at about $10 USD. That might be a good place to start. You can determine if you even have mold in your house, and to what extent.
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